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Comment Re:This simply means we're succeeding. (Score 1) 229

That is exactly how I intended it to work. >:-)

And exactly my current attitude. I've conserved quite a bit for my life, it makes sense to do so since energy costs money and a penny saved is a penny earned. If this is such a dire emergency- then it's time for those gulfstream liberals to stop flying.

Comment Re:This simply means we're succeeding. (Score 1) 229

More like- if the drought is real, then no bathing should be justified under any circumstances. Bathing can only be justified if the drought is false (that is, if we have the water necessary to bathe).

In other words, more a matter of conservation in time of emergency. If the emergency does not exist, then continue as normal.

Comment Re:This again? (Score 1) 394

"Assembly" is not a programming language...

I think you need to rethink that statement.

The earliest computers were often programmed without the help of a programming language, by writing programs in absolute machine language. The programs, in decimal or binary form, were read in from punched cards or magnetic tape, or toggled in on switches on the front panel of the computer. Absolute machine languages were later termed first-generation programming languages (1GL).

The next step was development of so-called second-generation programming languages (2GL) or assembly languages, which were still closely tied to the instruction set architecture of the specific computer. These served to make the program much more human-readable, and relieved the programmer of tedious and error-prone address calculations.

The first high-level programming languages, or third-generation programming languages (3GL), were written in the 1950s. An early high-level programming language to be designed for a computer was Plankalkül, developed for the German Z3 by Konrad Zuse between 1943 and 1945. However, it was not implemented until 1998 and 2000. - Wikipedia

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