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Comment Re:Next up dead (Score 1) 362

My Panasonic 50-something in TV is *not* a smart TV, and it's about 2 years old. I specifically shopped for a "dumb" TV. The features of smart TVs will quickly become outdated and cumbersome, and I hope to keep a TV for a good 10+ years. It was cheaper than the smart versions.

Comment Re:Just attention seeking, no substance (Score 1) 540

The whole thing smelled of bullshit from day zero. It's much easier for the US to get someone extradited from the UK than it is for them to extradite someone from Sweden, so the whole running-to-the-embassy thing never made sense, except as a possible means to escape being tried for rape. If the US really wanted him, they'd have had the extradition process started with the UK long before Assange went to the Ecuadorian embassy.

Comment Re: Amazing (Score 4, Insightful) 373

I've had insurance since I was born, I'm in my 50s, and my cost of insurance jumped 4 times since obamacare. My employer dropped it because insurance rates soared, so I no longer had matching, plus the regular rate better than doubled. And that is for insurance that covers almost nothing until I spend 28,000 because there are virtually NO doctors in the network. And NC has NO options, only Blue Cross. We used to have over half a dozen. My cost of insurance and overall healthcare went from being 5-10% of my income to over 1/3. So fuck your socialized healthcare that says responsible people have to pay insurance for irresponsible people that don't like to work. I'm fine helping those that can't help themselves, but this current bullshit is killing the middle class. You know, the people making 50k a year and pay the highest percentage of their income as tax because they don't make enough to shelter it. But then, that was the original plan, wasn't it? Make a system so god damn bad people would beg for a single payer. Guess what? You got Trump instead, so suck it up Dr. Buttercup. You have no fucking clue the pain this system has caused to hard working, middle American, blue collar people.

Comment Re:Burn in... Improvements? (Score 1) 238

how does the TV know the content was originally 1080p24? If you do inverse telecine on stuff which was originally recorded live interlaced you won't get very good results.

It's very easy for a filter to try reassembling fields into frames, then checking if they match, and perhaps outputting the interlaced fields to the next filter unmodified if they do not.

The pulldown pattern of duplicate fields is quite uniform and consistent, with the exception of the occasional edit, so it's obvious after just a few frames if your guess was wrong.

Comment Re:There's a Practical Charging Limit (Score 1) 198

A Gallon of gasoline is estimated to have 33.41 KwH! (A normal gas engine throws a good portion of that energy away as heat.) That gallon of gas is pretty close to what my typical household uses in the entire day for electricity! So to pull down the equivalent of a couple of gallons of gas in 20 minutes is going to take the equivalent power drain of a sub-station transformer.

That's some very bald-faced lying.

You already said that the theoretical energy of a tank of gasoline is mostly wasted, but then you go on to use that same number anyhow, as if EVs must waste just as much energy, for some reason. In fact electric motors and Li-Ion batteries are very efficient, while gasoline engines are very inefficient, so the numbers.

In fact a Tesla Model S battery ranges from 60-100 kWh depending on how much you spend, so your gas tank is only 2-3 gallons of theoretical gasoline, while still transporting you 300 miles.

A 60kWh charge in 20 minutes would be no problem for businesses. It's only 375A@480V (3-phase). Here's what 1200 amp, 3-phase electrical service looks like:
http://www.pesnj.com/uploads/2...
Does that look like a "sub-station transformer" to you?

A typical house doesn't use a 480 volt industrial power feed. You don't want much more current in the hands of consumers.

Why in the world would you need 20 minute charging AT HOME? What kind of emergency would necessitate that? Two people sharing a car, both commuting 100+ miles to work, on different shifts?

Most everyone else plugs-in their car, then GOES TO SLEEP. Who cares whether it charges in 10 minutes, or 10 hours, AT HOME?

Comment Re:Cold weather? (Score 1) 198

Our car batteries get a little cranky w/o either a trickle changer or a battery pad warmer at those temperatures.

Car starter batteries do terribly in cold weather because they are expected to deliver a huge percentage of their power in a few seconds, when cold. An EV will have a huge battery pack, which is only expected to output a small percentage of its available power gradually over the course of your drive.

In short, you'll have less range when the batteries are cold, but they will always work just fine (no start-up problems), and you might even see your range increase while you drive, as the batteries heat-up from being discharged.

And like you said, all cars in cold climates are pluged-in anyhow, so there's really no extra hassle to worry about, and they can be kept in ideal operating temperatures with inexpensive grid power.

Comment Re:Autonomous Date (Score 1) 198

Those "parlour tricks" do a pretty good job of driving already, another 4 years of machine learning and I think they'll do a stupendous job.

Autonomous cars did a pretty good job of driving a decade ago, too. I'm sure they'll do a pretty good job a decade from now, as well, but like today, still not be quite good enough.

Google's self-driving cars have reported higher incidents of accidents than human drivers, and most of them are limited to low-speeds, and still need human operators to occasionally get them out of trouble.

Comment Re:How many charge/discharge cycles? (Score 1) 198

As I understand it, the main ageing mechanism that kills them is oxidation of the graphite anode, which starts when the cell is manufactured and isn't appreciably affected by usage except for being accelerated somewhat by being stored at high temperatures with low (20%) charge.

That's complete nonsense.

Li-Ion cells absolutely are severely negatively affected by cycling. (PDF)

That's not to say there isn't calendar fade/degradation of Li-Ion cells. Just that it is far less significant than charge/discharge cycle fade. There is some of both, but that's only a significant concern for long-term standby power applications (not a significant issue for EVs).

Anecdotally, I recently swapped the battery in my cell phone. The replacement unit was new, old-stock. It was 4+ years old, manufactured at the same time as the dying battery it was replacing, but works quite nicely. No doubt it's slightly lower capacity than a newly manufactured battery would be, but not noticeably so.

Comment Re:Unlimited? (Score 3, Insightful) 196

Verizon has been very reasonable about allowing people to remain on unlimited plans, they could simply make everyone on one sign up for a current plan if they wished. But they don't

Verizon hasn't been reasonable at all... They've had their asses kicked by the Obama FCC every time they tried to impose limits or restrictions. They've tried not to piss off the FCC, and now that Trump is about to gut the agency, Verizon no longer has anything to worry about, for the next 4 years at least.

Comment Pushing up daisies (Score 0) 285

We don't just want you dead, we want you pushing up daisies. Literally.

Totally stupid. Like someone else said, the role of the military is to kill people and break stuff. Nothing else. Not nation building, not inventing environmentally friendly ways to kill. The goal should be to use the military sparingly, then when you do, use the most effective tools to do the ugly but necessary job.

Comment Re:BB, RIP (Score 1) 168

Other devices you have to pay by KILOBYTE
Iphone had the first data plan where they didn't meter you

Apple got extremely lucky that their device was the trendy, up-and-coming smart phone *JUST* before 3G came out. 2G data was painfully slow, incredibly expensive, and just worthless for browsing the web.

If the iPhone came out a few years earlier, the hype would have died down as people realized their flashy and expensive Apple product wasn't very useful with slow and expensive data. If another company had been debuting their new, revolutionary smart phone at the time, instead of Apple, the world would look quite different.

Comment Re:cult of mac (Score 1) 168

What was sorely needed though, was a phone that did mobile web browsing and didn't suck. Internet Explorer Mobile sucked, horridly. Every attempt it made to lay out a page on a 320x240 screen was basically an exercise in shuffling cards - it never, ever worked right...but miraculously, even it was a step up from the Blackberry browser, which couldn't do anything right. Showing a full website and pinching in and out to navigate it? That really was incredible for the time.

Opera did mobile browsing right, many years before the iPhone came out, and it was available on multiple platforms.

"The first version of Opera Mobile Classic was released in 2000 for the Psion Series 7 and NetBook, with a port to the Windows Mobile platform coming in 2004. One of Opera Mobile Classic's major features is the ability to dynamically reformat web pages to better fit the handheld's display using small screen rendering technology. Alternatively, the user may use page zooming for a closer or broader look." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

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