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Comment Re:Typical of today's programmer (Score 1) 196

On my Atari ST,with it's OS in 192 kB of ROM and 2.5 MB of RAM (upgraded from the stock 1 MB by soldering in two 1 MB SIMMs), I could run Calamus Desktop Publishing, Finale music scoring, PureC C-compiler (very compact and fast code), Bugaboo debugger, Signum typesetting, and many, many more. All in a windowed desktop environment. It may not have been as refined as contemporary counterparts, but is was not at all as difficult to use as you indicate.

Comment Does not compute (Score 4, Insightful) 117

They claim that all your data is stored on their servers in encrypted form, yet they will be able to search that data - on their servers - for something that you are looking for.
How will they ever achieve that?
The data is encrypted so they don't have themselves access to it, yet, when you want to search something, they apparently have it all indexed for you.
How can they ever index it if they cannot read the data itself?

Comment Re:one in every home? (Score 3, Interesting) 228

As I read it, TFA _does_ give a clue as to efficiency.
60% of the electrons are used for producing ethanol.
Equilibrium potential for the ethanol reaction is 84 mV.
The total voltage that is used is 1.2V, which is 14 times as high.
That means that only 7% of the voltage is used effectively.
This gives a total energy of a little over 4%.
In the conclusion, this is mentioned as "The overpotential (which might be lowered with the proper electrolyte, and by separating the hydrogen production to another catalyst) probably precludes economic viability for this catalyst"

So, they don't (dare to) mention efficiency directly, but data is presented by which it can be calculated.

Comment Re:I don't (Score 1) 385

And, as a result, the merchant will need to increase their prices to stay profitable.
In The Netherlands, most people I know don't have a credit card, but a debit card with chip and pin.
Guess how many fraudulent charges most of us get per year (or even in our lifetime): none!
Most people here act as if credit card fraud is a given, but only a minor nuisance.
They ignore that in the end they will bear the cost nevertheless, and that it is preventable.

Comment Slashdot leadership is stupid, or they cannot read (Score 1) 150

It still says
"Polls on the front page of Slashdot? Is the world coming to an end?! Nope; read more about it."
at the top of every story, one week after it had already become obviously clear that the Slashdot community unanimously judged polls on the front page to be a monumentally stupid idea.
Either Slashdot leadership do not read the page they urge us to read, or they are monumentally stupid themselves (or both, which I do not exclude)

Comment Re:For that matter... phones. (Score 1) 790

I dialed phone numbers by rapidly depressing the hook. Worked like a charm.
I then found out that 11 pulses followed by a few (2 or so) 'normal' digits would also give you a connection.
Judging by the response I got, I presume this was a number within the telephone company.
I was 10 years old at that time, so I hung up in a hurry ;-)

Comment Re:We Wish (Score 1) 663

If it would consume more energy to produce a solar panel than it will produce in its lifetime, then either:
- I would not be able to ever recoup my investment (but I can with current energy prices reach this in 15 years), or
- Solar panel producers pay far less for their energy than I do, or
- they would make a loss and go bankrupt.
The price of a solar panel will (except for subsidies) never be lower than the price of the energy needed to produce it.
As long as I can install one and make a profit, I don't believe that producing it will have cost more energy than it will ever produce.

Comment Re:Preach it (Score 1) 59

So if the ringer was ringing and you pick up the phone there might leak some of the 90 V signal into the microphone?

That wouldn't be too good for the microphone.
The switches of the hook are there to prevent that.
They connect/disconnect in such an order that the telephone exchange is signalled that you pick up the receiver so the ringer signal is switched off before the speaker and mic are connected. I once had a telephone where this dis not work properly. When you picked it up at the exact moment of a ring, a loud buzzing sound came out of the earpiece. Not nice.

And did you consider what happens if you put a High frequency signal onto the line? Some of the signal might be affected by the condensator combined with the mic, and a usable signal might gotten of it.

If the receiver is on hook, both mic and speaker are completely disconnected, as you can see.
The capacitor is in series with the ringer, not with mic/speaker.
Please let me know from the schematic (the one I linked to, or another one if mine is not correct for the phone you have in mind) what exact signal pathway you have in mind. "Some of the signal might be affected" is too vague to be refuted or confirmed.

Comment Re:Preach it (Score 1) 59

Yes, I know the difference.
I have disassembled T65 telephones, myself, and I did not find any difference to the schematic I linked to.
That is why I asked you to post the schematic of the telephones you disassembled that were different.
Unless you can do so, and explain how a telephone off hook can be used to eavesdrop on you, you confirm my opinion that you are a troll.
A moderately competent one, I must say: I'm still feeding you...

Comment Re:Yeah I remember that (Score 1) 64

Yeah, the display hardware of the ZX81 was brilliant in its simplicity.
Not only did it use the program counter as the character point er for the display, but the I/R (interrupt and DRAM refresh) register pair was used as a pointer into the character ROM. These were output automatically by the processor directly after the fetch of the instruction.
And each line of the display was ended by a HALT instruction, so short lines did not need the full 32 bytes.
And, and, and... I loved that machine for its (albeit just a _little_ bit convoluted) design!

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