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Comment Re:Gov. leaders unsually have no technical knowled (Score 1) 192

"Ranting" and "raging" is infantile behavior.

Hyperbole detection check: Failed. We have eloquently tried to express our concerns and displeasure with this development among mainstream users to gain broader support and failed.

Instead, prepare a set of laws and regulations that we recommend. Get the process started.

And the first thing any politician will ask is whether anyone wants this. The industry doesn't want it? People don't want it? If there is neither money nor votes behind it the proposal is dead on arrival. Besides what would these laws and regulations do, outlaw services? Agreeing to the Windows 10 EULA isn't even close to the stupidest thing you can legally do to yourself. Become a 500lb tub of lard. Get a face tattoo. Be the goatse guy. Proximity flying in a wingsuit. Become a NAMBLA spokesman. The EULA might not even make the top ten.

Comment Re:We ran the same calculus (Score 1) 192

However....backup, anti-virus, spam filtering, and a DR solution drives up the cost very quickly.

The marginal cost of backup and DR when you're *already* doing those things for an on-prem server environment is pretty close to zero, and if you're already virtualized and have a virtual-oriented backup software you probably already have DR integrated into your backup. AV and anti-spam are almost always done best these days by a third party service and the good ones do both anyway.

From the numbers I've run, it usually is cheaper to do it on prem above about 50 users with a 3 year benchmark. If you time the upgrade right, you can probably get 5 years out of it without falling more than a rev behind and cut the 50 user number way down.

It's pretty obvious Microsoft is heading subscription-only for everything. Since 2013, Exchange has lost much of its GUI which I think has been a way to scare on-prem admins away. They will ultimately either price on prem high enough that only a few compliance/security focused large organizations will consider it or support hybrid only (meaning you're paying for O365, used or not).

Cloud is about permanent vendor-lock in and rent-seeking, not economics. The marginal cost of a 5-9s commercial data center for hosting cloud services is greater than the marginal savings to users, which is why hosted systems always end up being so expensive unless you're doing something really trivial like a static web site.

Comment Pascal, “not clean”??? (Score 1) 480

And not as clean as C? They’re smoking crack or what? Pascal is so clean you can’t shoot yourself in the foot like you can with C! Ever wondered why there were no exploits in MacOS like there are in Windows? Because MacOS is written in Pascal! Good luck doing a string buffer overrun in Pascal! Here is on what I wrote my first program ever: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

Comment Nobody else???? (Score 1) 480

I self-taught myself Basic, followed by RBase / DBase, if those can be considered proper languages. My first college level language course was COBOL, of which I remember the formatting, but no syntax. C is still my favorite, mainly because it's so simple and powerful, but sadly it's rarely practical anymore. Golang is my second favorite.

Comment Re:Why pay the Microsoft tax? (Score 4, Insightful) 192

One thing I've learned over the years is that Slashdot commenters are generally not good at reacting to abuse. Slashdot commenters make excuses, or react to abuse weakly.

I see the last 20 years have done nothing to dampen your idealism, good for you but maybe an ounce of reality wouldn't hurt? Back then your data was local, you had the executable and the only thing you didn't have was the source code to inspect it. Even though things like email went from your server to their server instead of peer to peer, things were pretty distributed and decentralized. Having access to the source code was mostly about being able to fix and extend it, not that it did something nasty.

Not only have consumers ignored open source solutions, they've gone totally the other way. Much of their data lives in the cloud, where they have no control of what's done with it. They use huge, centralized services like Facebook that collects a ton of data. Auto-updating devices download and install new executable code all the time and often rely on online servers. People don't care that they're being tracked and in many cases even accuse those who object of having something to hide. They sign away all rights in mile-long EULAs without thought.

We've ranted. We've raged. We've raised the banners and tried to proclaim YotLD many times. XPs online activation in 2001. Slammer & friends in 2003. Vista in 2006. "Trusted Computing" sometime late 2000s. Windows 8 in 2012. Windows 10 in 2015. Stealth telemetry in all VS apps in 2016. I'm sure there's many more things I've forgotten. I'm sure there's bad things about Apple, Google, Adobe and many others. We've raged out. It's like "OMG OMG Microsoft is... wait, what's the point? Why is anyone going to listen now, when they never have in the past?"

They earn billions of dollars that way. And in between screwing us over they sometime make pretty good software, so yeah... maybe open source is more efficient but one idealist versus a hundred paid developers is unfair teams. So I run Win7 and I got an iPhone. Should it have been Linux and a rooted Android phone? Maybe. But like I said, raged out. If I can't even stand the hassle myself, it's pretty hard to ask anyone else to fight a fight I feel is pretty hopeless. Pretty sure I'm not the only disillusioned ex-revolutionary here.

Comment Re:Examples (Score 1) 192

OwnCloud is almost there. IMHO, the devs should have a team which focuses on packaging a complete "appliance" images like pfSense capable of managing the storage subsytem from a web gui.

When I last looked at it, someone had done this themselves but it took some shell work to manage the OS storage side of things, certificates, etc.

There are canned EC2 instances, but for storage intensive versions the cost is approaching or over $1/hr.

Comment Re: Time to switch (Score 2) 192

I'm curious how big companies justify anything over $5 a month.

Most companies of any size have virtualization which almost always means that running Exchange amounts to software licensing and a fairly thin amount of admin time.

A single Exchange server should scale to 500 users pretty easily -- at $35 month, you're making a $175,000 commitment or $525,000 over 3 years. The office and Exchange licensing for on-prem isn't $525,000.

I know some organizations have struggled with Exchange reliability, but I've worked in the managed services and consulting space and the vast majority of on-prem installs I've worked with have been extremely reliable and problems have usually been the result of some really bad admin decisions.

I've laid the costs out side by side for customers who have run on-prem, including admin costs, and almost none have chosen 365.

Comment Re:More science (Score 2) 240

Over the time scale of the next century, only one input signal will dominate: the amount of added greenhouse gases. All of that other stuff either oscillates too fast or has an insignificant effect. Other signals that would have a big impact, such as changes in the earth's orbit that drive ice ages, or movement of mountain ranges due to continental drift, are too slow to have an impact over the next couple of centuries.

Relative to the greenhouse gas signal, the climate *was* very close to an equilibrium on a human timescale. It certainly isn't any longer; it's being strongly driven into ranges hotter than it's been for millions of years.

Comment Re:More science (Score 1) 240

The final color of mixing two buckets of paint is the integrated effect of chaotic stirring (and all of the world's supercomputers probably couldn't predict the exact pattern of those swirls). However, the final color can easily be calculated with high precision using a hand calculator. Integration has smaller error bars than you think it does.

Comment Re: Lots of children have the wrong DNA. (Score 1) 233

It's been quite a while since I was in high school, but I remember a much higher percentage of bastards than that.

Asshats have a much bigger chance of being raised by asshats, nature vs nurture and all that. Being a bastard is just one of those "kick where it hurts" words like that you're fat, have freckles, wear glasses, wrong skin color, have a funny dialect or speech impediment, it's f-f-f-f-f-unny you see. I've been on the receiving end of a lot of teasing but ultimately I've understood it's all about some people's need to establish a pecking order. And I've kicked downwards where maybe I shouldn't, but it felt good to have someone below me. I wasn't very mature at the time and I didn't act very mature.

We act like children are born innocent and all that, but there's a saying that from kids and drunk men you hear the truth. Well from kids and drunk men you're also more likely to get punched in the face. We're far from innocent, we're a bundle of raw emotion caught in a web of civilization. Not behaving like wild animals is a trained behavior. I tend to think we have a far greater capacity for cruelty than anyone really likes to think about, the Nazi concentration camps are but one example. Having done that analysis on myself, if I genuine believed in something... I'm scared to consider how far I'd really go.

Comment Re:The problem is depth perception (Score 1) 53

The probem with that is that they are most likely doing some kind of reinforcement learning. That requires not just an input, but also an ability to respond to the input, and then be scored on the response.

A game that simulates driving like this might be an excellent way to get a baseline level of training for the AI, since it can experience many more combinations of situations in simulation than it can in real life driving.

Comment Re:Systemd! (Score 1) 292

As long as it stays as an init program, it's fine because it can be swapped out easily. But if it starts becoming a required component for turning up the volume, that is clearly a sign of poor design.

Well it has to talk to something. I mean we had applications that used to talk directly to the hardware back in the DOS days, this application can talk to Soundblaster and Gravis Ultrasound, I don't want to go back there. So you want to fix it a bit on the hardware side so all the apps can talk to one interface and it'll play on all sound cards. And you want to fix it on the software side so more than one application can play sound at the same time.

And then the ball starts rolling, does it have a hardware mixer? Is it a 5.1 surround setup or a 2.0 headphone? Does it have positional sound? Can it bitstream compressed audio to another device? Can we have ann equalizer? Per-application audio controls? Etc. and so eventually you end up with a form of "sound system service". Eventually you have to decide on a standard.

Comment Re:Lots of children have the wrong DNA. (Score 2) 233

There are plenty of cucks out there

Actually research indicate there aren't, at least not after birth control, legalized abortion and the awareness of DNA tests. Current estimates are 1-3% of the population. The excessively high numbers you get quoted from time to time are because they've self-selected groups where the paternity is in doubt, in these low confidence selections it's 10-30%.

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