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Comment Re:Online ? Authors never shopped in real life (Score 1) 67

Unfortunately groceries kind of suck online in the UK.

Seriously? Between the major supermarket chains and Ocado all providing online order / home delivery, none of them works for you? I'll admit, I gave up on Tesco repeatedly sending me things that were one day away from their use-by date, but there's a reasonable amount of competition.

Comment Re:It's not just shocking, it's stupid (Score 1) 67

You actually see this on Amazon, where a number of third-party sellers automatically set their prices by querying the Amazon price or the cheapest third-party price and undercutting it slightly. This sometimes leads to amusing effects where two third-party sellers are offering something for 10% less than the cheapest other seller and forget to set a minimum price.

Comment Re:If the NSA wasn't evil (Score 1) 104

They would immediately tell Intel, Microsoft, and Mr Torvalds exactly what flaws they are exploiting so they could be closed. Instead, being the evil assholes they are, they won't tell anyone. Cuz we all know the NSA is smarter than the Chinese, Russians, and random hacker groups who exploit the same holes.

I guess it's a difference of philosophy. I want my computing to be as secure as possible. The NSA wants to hack anyone's system at anytime.

My philosophy is comment sense, the NSA's is pure evil considering it lessens my security.

Wrong. The government is ordering to put the flaw in!! If Snowden is correct under the American Patriot Act they can arrest those who do not comply making their products with backdoors so the government doesn't have to get a court order.

To me that is pure evil. You think Apple and Android LOVE putting in hidden apps that secret turn your phones into recording devices that send the GPS and conversations wihtout you knowing while appearing off?

Comment It makes sense (not in a bad way) (Score 1) 30

Reason being is Salesforce is kind of scaring me as too powerful and a threat to I.T. jobs.

If it is cross platform which MS is heading too we can put down the hate on MS like its 1999 still. From what I gather is it is not ads, but rather MS won the desktop wars by integrating and doing proprietary tricks to link stuff together ALA Visual Basic COM objects. You had everything tie together.

Today in 2017 Windows is not longer the guerala. But MS is hardly dead in the workplace. So instead of integrating components and doing proprietary standards they are doing open standards with TypeScript, .NET, Android in Visual Studio, SQL Server for Linux, Powershell for Mac/Linux, and MS Code editor for Linux, and embracing Linux Vms, and even making MS Code available for Linux and Mac. Their browsers are all fully W3C compliant now and Office 365 is the reason why.

So MS is doing the data and service integration instead. If the company owner, your employees, and yourself all use LinkedIn, Yammer, and other tools which run on multiplatforms it gets rid of a reason to use Salesforce.com.

MS maybe getting too powerful in this area but Office 365 is rapidly getting more apps and mobile programs like Dwell, PowerBI, etc. LinkedIN is the glue that ties this together to keep business to business relationships on the ecosystem ... rather than crappy COM win32 standards.

Comment Re:CEO's fear (Score 1) 240

I seem to recall a study a few years back that showed that most highly paid CEOs' decisions were not better than random and, in a number of cases, were significantly worse. They shouldn't be worried that they can be replaced by AI, they should be worried that they can be replaced by a magic 8 ball.

Comment Re:Robots are good (Score 3, Insightful) 240

The problem isn't robots taking all our jobs, it's robots taking half of our jobs. How do you manage a society in which 50% of the working-age population are contributing essential work for the functioning of civilisation and the other 50% are not able to do anything that a machine can't do better? Unemployment rates of 10-20% are currently seriously problematic for western societies and cause huge economic problems. For some jobs, you can solve it by dividing the work among more people, so you have four people working a 10 hour week instead of one working a 40 hour week, but that doesn't help you to deal with the people who aren't able to do any available jobs.

Comment Re:It's not that I want to brag I'm old... (Score 1) 380

Add to that, the defining feature of a functional language is the set of things that it disallows, not the set of things that it permits. A multi-paradigm language, by definition, has to permit anything that the various paradigms permit and so doesn't gain the benefits that you get from being able to reason about your code in a language that doesn't permit unconstrained mutability or side effects.

Comment Re:It has its uses (Score 3, Interesting) 380

This needs moderating up. Talk to an Ocaml programmer and a Haskell programmer about what makes a functional language and you'll see very different opinions and these two are languages that were actually designed as functional languages: the bits that end up in other languages are a tiny subset.

Coming from the Haskell side, I see functional programming as programming without side effects and with monads. You can implement monadic constructs in other languages, but it rarely makes code cleaner. Just having higher-order functions doesn't make a language a functional language any more than having structs makes C an object-oriented language.

If the question is 'do you think using higher-order functions simplifies the expression of some algorithms' then the answer is obviously 'yes': programmers have a lot of tools to choose from and most of them are useful at least some of the time.

Comment Re:It has its uses (Score 3, Interesting) 380

In C++14 in particular, lambdas with auto parameters dramatically reduce copy-and-paste coding. If you have a couple of lines of code that's repeated, it isn't worth factoring it out into a separate templated function (in particular, you'll often need to pass so many arguments that you'll end up with more code at the end), but pulling it into a lambda that binds everything by reference and has auto-typed parameters can reduce the amount of source code, while generating the same object code (the lambda will be inlined at all call sites).

Comment El nino would cool Great Barrier (Score 1) 93

Last I checked the western hemisphere's tropical and subtropical oceans warm while the eastern cool during an El Nino, while the opposite is true during a La Nina. We had one of the longest La Ninas lasting many years until last year which is why the California drought became so severe.

Am I wrong?

Comment Re:We ran the same calculus (Score 1) 214

However....backup, anti-virus, spam filtering, and a DR solution drives up the cost very quickly.

The marginal cost of backup and DR when you're *already* doing those things for an on-prem server environment is pretty close to zero, and if you're already virtualized and have a virtual-oriented backup software you probably already have DR integrated into your backup. AV and anti-spam are almost always done best these days by a third party service and the good ones do both anyway.

From the numbers I've run, it usually is cheaper to do it on prem above about 50 users with a 3 year benchmark. If you time the upgrade right, you can probably get 5 years out of it without falling more than a rev behind and cut the 50 user number way down.

It's pretty obvious Microsoft is heading subscription-only for everything. Since 2013, Exchange has lost much of its GUI which I think has been a way to scare on-prem admins away. They will ultimately either price on prem high enough that only a few compliance/security focused large organizations will consider it or support hybrid only (meaning you're paying for O365, used or not).

Cloud is about permanent vendor-lock in and rent-seeking, not economics. The marginal cost of a 5-9s commercial data center for hosting cloud services is greater than the marginal savings to users, which is why hosted systems always end up being so expensive unless you're doing something really trivial like a static web site.

You guys are somethign else. You bashed WIndows NT and then called Windows Server for years for not having a CLI. Hey look at Unix we do not have to sit in front of the server to admin it etc. Now MS has powershell and it is BEH WHERE IS THE GUI?! Exchange is a very complex project because many organizations have complex uses. If your admin can't handle scripting and commands then he is incompetent. If you are paying someone +$75,000 a year he or she should be a master at that price and have years of experience.

Comment Re: Time to switch (Score 1) 214

Dude it is 2017. Wordperfect and Lotus 123 lost. Deal with it. The world runs on Microsoft. You can't have your sales team making documents misformatting in potential clients computers. Customers make custom Sharepoint sites and use MS teams to arrange things.

I am not saying this as a super MS fanboy. I am just stating reality. If Libreoffice was around in the early days of the internet in the 1990s maybe this wouldn't be a thing, but the office runs on MS and Intune, Office, Skype, Sharepoint, MS project, etc.

Comment Re: Time to switch (Score 1) 214

I'm curious how big companies justify anything over $5 a month.

Most companies of any size have virtualization which almost always means that running Exchange amounts to software licensing and a fairly thin amount of admin time.

A single Exchange server should scale to 500 users pretty easily -- at $35 month, you're making a $175,000 commitment or $525,000 over 3 years. The office and Exchange licensing for on-prem isn't $525,000.

I know some organizations have struggled with Exchange reliability, but I've worked in the managed services and consulting space and the vast majority of on-prem installs I've worked with have been extremely reliable and problems have usually been the result of some really bad admin decisions.

I've laid the costs out side by side for customers who have run on-prem, including admin costs, and almost none have chosen 365.

THanks to the horrible US healthcare system and high corporate tax rates a good Exchange admin who is worth $80,000 a year costs $170,000 easily in 401K, healthcare costs, and taxes for the employer. The cost of energy for the server could easily be $10,000 a year per server. Our former MDF cost 1 million a year of electricity at our site of ust 1,100 users.

The race to the bottom with falling wages for mellinials and robotic automation is because of healthcare costs which keep going up 10% per year. So to the employer $50,000 a year for someone 15 years ago costs the same as some intern making $12/hr out of college.

With Office 365 you do not have to worry about the competence of the your admin too. You log in and work. Office 365 is great for small to medium sized companies who do not know even how to make a Sharepoint or use PowerBi. THe tools are there for anyone to quickly whip something together.

Unless you are a very large enteprise with very unique requirements it is just cheaper and easier to pay a bill. Does your employer have a custom electrician and plumbing officers which generate the water and electricity or do they pay a bill each month?

Comment Re:Time to switch (Score 1) 214

If you run the other popular operating system, full installs of Pages, Numbers and Keynote come with it.

As usual the anti MS hate is in the story. The title is wrong.

Yes MS plans to keep desktop versions of their apps. What MS is doing is requiring an Office 365 account to use Skype for Business and OneDrive when support ends in 2020 for Office 2016.

The desktop apps are here to stay folks

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