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Comment Re:mpv does support user supplied shaders (Score 1) 216

mpv allows the user to supply GLSL scripts using the --opengl-shaders=filename option, and it can save single screenshots to files after those shaders have been applied (Ctrl-S), and mpv is scriptable (in Lua or C), so all you need to do is write a script that single-steps through the video, then writes such a post-processed screenshot to a pipe which you can use as input to "ffmpeg".

Doesn't mpv support direct output to a series of PNGs? MPlayer does it simply with -vo png.

Incidendally, I'm working on something related to the original question. I use shaders for math art demos, and I already have the option of using image files as the input (shameless example). It would be trivial to accept a new file for each frame, so it could process video from a series of images. The speed would only be a couple of FPS due to I/O bottleneck, but it won't be realtime anyway. The reason I haven't done this so far is that my focus is on the math of iterated shaders, not processing some existing video. Still, it would be fun to do some day, and of course I'm looking at ways to do it in realtime (the GPU is fast enough, but I/O is harder).

Lastly, you could use a screen recording software instead of the clunky series-of-screenshots idea. I did this for putting my first few demos on Youtube, but the quality is awful, so I much prefer taking the PNGs and encoding separately.

Comment Re:Uhh... (Score 4, Insightful) 216

Yeah, basically this. Find the software that's closest to what you want to do and get on their community software and ask if there's already a way to do it. Your idea probably isn't unique, but just in case it is, the community can give feedback as to whether it's a good idea or not, and then if it is good their docs or people in the community will tell you how to put in a feature request. At that point, follow most of the advice others are giving about building or buying.

Comment Re: Is more education, better education . . . ? (Score 2) 476

You are simply mis-reading what is stated in that document. The US citizen parent had to be resident in the US for ten years (prior to the birth). How can I be so certain? I am in a similar category, but was born outside the US to a US mother and a father who had not been ten years resident in the US. I had, since birth, US citizenship until I renounced a few years ago.

Comment Re:Edge to edge screen hard for me to use (Score 1) 73

Everyone puts their phone in case, so that adds a bezel.

To the contrary - the edge of the case, even on phones with a thin bezel - prevents the edges of the screens from being used. This always gets me with text selection on Android.

With no bezel, you can't have a case wrap around the top edge. From the perspective of selling screens and replacement phones it's a fabulous idea.

Comment Re:Projections are always horseshit (Score 2) 392


The word 'projection' when used by business or government s a fancy way of saying they can the future. Through enough numbers and fancy colorful graphs and people will believe anything.

But that's fine. The voters should allow the bond after a construction company has given a firm bid and demonstrated that it has insurance for up to, say, 5x cost overruns.

If no one company can cover that much, the managers can break it up into small enough pieces until the voters have a guaranteed not-to-exceed cost.

Any voter who believes initial government estimates is a fool.

Android

Headphone Users Rejoice: Samsung Reportedly Not Killing the Galaxy S8's Headphone Jack (thenextweb.com) 78

An anonymous reader writes: Contrary to previous reports, Samsung's upcoming flagship Galaxy S8 smartphone will come with a headphone jack, unlike the new iPhone 7 and 7 Plus and several other Android smartphones. The news comes from both Sammobile and Android Police. The Next Web reports: "Both Sammobile and Android Police are today reporting that Samsung is not actually killing the headphone jack. Sammobile, appears to be retracting its own report last month suggesting the jack would be dropped thanks to recent case renders, while Android Police has independently confirmed that the S8 will maintain the 3.5mm jack through its own source. In related news, Samsung's display unit may have also just given us our first good look at the S8. While there's a good chance the phone in the video is a generic model (it appears to be a render, rather than a physical object), as CNET points out, it looks an awful lot like the leaks we've seen from the S8 so far. There are also a few curious touches for a something that's supposed to be just a render, including what might be a faint visible antenna line (on the upper left corner) and a couple of LEDs or sensors to the left of the earpiece grill. By the way, there's also a definitely a headphone jack in this render."

Comment Re:They need better cyber (Score 1) 273

Yeah, I tried putting a giant rubber sheath over my monitor too, but apparently that doesn't stop you from getting an infection when you cyber. I feel his pain.

I thought sexual education in the US was all about abstinence, never mind the resulting teen pregnancy rates. That rubber thingie sounds like some European socialist hippie plot.

Comment Re:My art is shit (Score 1) 562

To me, music means sound waves in the air, something meant to be listened with your ears. Whenever I see these hipsters talking about vinyl or cassettes etc., I wonder if they care more about the storage format than the music itself. If they cared about the music, they might choose a format that doesn't degrade the music so much.
AI

HTC's New Flagship Phone Has AI and a Second Screen, But No Headphone Jack (theverge.com) 205

An anonymous reader shares a report on The Verge: HTC is getting 2017 off to a flying start with an unseasonably early announcement of its next flagship phone: the U Ultra. This 5.7-inch device inaugurates a new U series of smartphones and is joined by a smaller and lesser U Play, which scales things down to 5.2 inches and a humbler camera and processor spec. HTC is touting a new Sense Companion, which is its take on the growing trend for putting AI assistants into phones, plus the addition of a second screen at the top of the U Ultra. As with Apple's latest iPhones, Lenovo's Moto Z, and the HTC Bolt, neither of HTC's new handsets has a headphone jack. The other big change on the outside is the U Ultra's second screen, which is a thin 2-inch strip residing to the right of the front-facing camera and immediately above the Super LCD 5 screen.

Comment Re: Assuming all goes well... (Score 1) 101

Very, very few people who live within fifteen miles of Cape Canaveral lived there before they built a space complex. And many, many more of them have been killed driving to the shopping mall since they built a space complex.

Nobody would live there if absolute safety was the criteria for Vespucci or the Seminole - it's an unreasonable standard for real life.

Comment Re:As it should be... (Score 4, Insightful) 389

I certainly can see the benefit of living in a police state where everyone is hoping to get dirt on everyone else, but I also see the benefit of living in the US with it's traditional values of privacy and limited police power, where fighting crime is less of a priority than making sure the citizen is protected from having their home invaded by the cops or their stuff taken or their liberty denied without due process.

In any case, if I were a low paid tech worker, I think I would have significant incentive to fabricate evidence. $500 is a weeks pay, at least, for these guys.

Comment Parallelism (Score 5, Interesting) 338

Say, about fifteen years ago, there was huge buzz about how languages and compilers were going to take care of the "Moore's Law Problem" by automating the parallelism of every task that could be broken up. With single-static assignment trees and the like the programmer was going to be freed from manually doing the parallelism.

With manufacturers starting to turn out 32- and 64-core chips, I'm wondering how well did we did on that front. I don't see a ton of software automatically not pegging a core on my CPU's. The ones that aren't quite as bad are mostly just doing a fork() in 2017. Did we get anywhere? Are we almost there? Is software just not compiled right now? Did it turn out to be harder than expected? Were languages not up to the task? Is hardware (e.g. memory access architectures) insufficient? Was the possibility oversold in the first place?

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