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Comment Local Gov't hurt worse (Score 1) 299

Its going to have a bigger effect on local government financing than anything else. In theory there will be a huge drop in red light / speeding / parking tickets that will smack the municipal bottom line pretty hard. That's why I'm not so gung ho about the prospects of automated cars. In order to make up for the loss of revenue municipalities will regulate the shit out of the industry, most likely treating it like a utility (for our own good, of course), and limiting the competition so that they have to buy (expensive) licenses from the city. It'll be Taxi Medallions Part 2.

Comment Re:The answer is obvious (but not to techies) (Score 1) 507

I'd (somewhat) disagree. Amazon Fire or Roku sticks are cheap and easy to set up/use. The only downside is that you now have two remotes to worry about instead of one. On the plus side, you've probably saved some money buying a good but dumb TV and a stick, when the Roku/Fire stick gets long in the tooth its cheaper to replace than the SmartTV once the manufacturer stops supporting it, and you can change ecosystems fairly cheaply with minimal disruptions.

Comment Re:Never seen one (Score 3, Informative) 31

I run it on an old Nexus 4 for shits and grins. Basically the only advantage that I can see (and the only reason I haven't wiped it off the Nexus) is I think the "hook the phone up to a monitor/keyboard and turn it into a computer" is the next big step in mobile computing. Whoever gets it right first will have the advantage. Microsoft is trying with Continuum, and Ubuntu has their version. Android has their home grown merging of ChromeOS/Android, plus third party things like RemixOS, and it looks like Apple are moving OSX and iOS closer to each other as well.

Odds are Ubuntu won't be the winner but its interesting to see where they're going with their phone OS.

Other than that, though, there's no compelling reason to use it. App ecosystem is basically barren, and there's nothing compelling about the UI to recommend it above all the other options.

Comment Re:I sympathize I ride DC's METRO rail (Score 1) 474

"The REAL question, at least in my eyes, for Metro, is given the damage shown during the March 17th shutdown [washingtonpost.com], how did these cables POSSIBLY have passed the inspection that was claimed to have been done after the L'Enfant Plaza incident. . ."

Like most things having to do with DC there's a complete and utter lack of accountability (see DC Gov't, DCPS, etc.). When the inevitable shit hits the fan just wave your hands and yell something like "lack of a dedicated funding," point the finger-of-blame at an outsider and the buck is magically passed.

Comment Re:Fairly well known issue (Score 1) 567

"However, the cost of creating recordings has gone down."

Way to not read the article.

From Mr Lowery

“Well artists are making less money but recording costs are lower, so the artists are doing okay”.

In other words technology has lowered your revenues in the form of unlicensed file-sharing on an industrial scale but that’s okay because Digidesign (the makers of Pro-Tools) has given back some cost savings. As if Kim Dotcom and Digidesign share the same bank account. These people believe in technology like it is a religion. The lord Technology Industry taketh, and The Lord Technology Industry giveth back.

The data I have from recording studios says something different. Recording budgets are lower because artists spend dramatically less time recording. They just don’t have the money.

Recording budgets didn’t start shrinking until after the advent of file-sharing. 2002 ish. While most of the improvements in technology and gains in productivity occurred in the early 1990s. By 1996 the home studio/pro studio production chain was firmly in place. Pro studios used for “tracking” and “mixing.” Home or project studios used for overdubs and editing. If lower recording budgets were caused by improvements in technology they should have started shrinking 10 years earlier.

Sound recordings are very labor intensive. If you want to make good ones you are relying on highly skilled labor. The cost of sound recordings is largely dependent on labor costs. Technological advances have little effect on recording cost.

This is the main problem with the technologists contention recordings should be free. They seem to think that the only people who work on recordings are the touring performers themselves. Artists still have to pay for that highly skilled labor.

Is the mix engineer gonna follow us around on tour hawking HIS T-shirts to the audience?

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