Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Comment Re:High failure rate (Score 1) 209

They are using consumer drives for data center needs, this is the big reason their failure rate is relatively high. Still, with the redundancy, it is cheaper to run this way. Rumor is that Google ran that way with off the shelf computers. Use dirt cheap commodity products that are good quality, have exceptional redundancy, throw them away as they implode.

Comment Re:Harm (Score 1) 93

Kind of funny, our company is on the cutting edge actually, but in fluorescents, not LEDs, which are terrible for producing what we would consider high output of UVB or UVA. There is a huge difference between 320nm and 399nm, yet both are "UVA". 320nm has a lot more energy, and as you up in frequency (down in nm), it forms a Bell curve and gets exponentially more damaging. It also goes down in penetration, which is why you can get a quick flash burn from UVC (100nm-280nm) that doesn't penetrate more than a few layers of skin, but it is very damaging to those layers. And of course, the real kicker is how much you are getting.

And the reason it has that warning on it is simple: anything with any measurable amount of UVA must have that warning by law. The FDA regulates this (CFR 1040.20 for sunlamps, for example). I'm used to seeing them regularly for inspections. For some reason, general lighting fluorescents are excepted from this warning, even though they do produce a measurable amount of UVA.

Comment Re:Harm (Score 3, Informative) 93

385nm is invisible to almost all humans, being on the long-ish wavelength of UV, and I wouldn't really say it was very damaging. Everyone likes to jump on the bandwagon like they actually know something about UV when in fact they don't. I've worked with it over 25 years, still do. Out of the millions of products sold, I've never had an injury reported. People do get hurt with UV, but that is exceedingly rare and usually because they didn't follow directions or did something really stupid.

Inside fiber, it is pretty harmless. Most plastics block it (excepting OP4 acrylic), the vast majority of paints absorb it and won't reflect it. It has a smaller wavelength, thus more waves per centimeter, ie: more data. I'm not saying their plan is good or bad, but blanket calling UV dangerous and not workable is ignorant.

Comment Re:Alleviate bandwidth concerns (Score 1) 94

Netflix has proven that the main reason people pirate isn't about money, it is about convenience. We want media our way. I haven't pirated anything in forever since getting Netflix. Pirating is easy, but then I have it on one machine, and I don't want to copy everything to every non-networked machine. Netflix is simply easier to use for most people, the variety is quite good, and the price is reasonable. This downloading might be an extra $$ feature, but if it costs 2 bucks more a month (same cost to them, really), people will use it, particularly those on the road who tire of mediocre internet access in the average hotel.

Comment Re:Reasons (Score 2) 306

or don't use the Facebook app. I don't, yet I check in with Facebook from time to time, then close out the browser in my phone. They are soon to stop allowing people to use their chat unless you install their app, and again, I won't install it. I don't want Facebook to run in the background, but I still want to use Wifi and even GPS. If they stop allowing you to use any Facebook without the app, then I will stop using it on my phone. It isn't like Facebook makes me money or enriches my life, it just lets me talk to family without having to actually talk to them.

Comment Re:That's OK (Score 1) 189

I agree. I've already decided to not install the messenger app no matter what, told people I chat with. What sucks is when you try to use regular chat NOW, it will bump you to down toad the app a couple of times, won't let you into the regular chat until you do a couple of gyrations No thanks, just like I said no thanks to Windows 10.

Comment Re:And this will change nobody's minds.. (Score 5, Informative) 378

Actually, that isn't really so extreme. If you use these seeds, you can't keep back seeds from your crops for next year's crops, a practice that is as old as agriculture itself. This might sound like it isn't a big deal "Just don't use GMO seeds", but it is getting so the variety of seeds that aren't GMO is diminishing, leaving few choices. I'm not claiming it is evil, but there are some ramifications that haven't been worked out.

This is why some 3rd world countries won't use it, not fear of GMO itself, but they don't want to be beholden to an American company for their seeds. I really don't blame them. I'm a USAF vet, all American guy, but I wouldn't trust US companies (or our govt) strong enough for the food supply of another nation. We have a bad history of using shit like that to our advantage.

Submission + - Badlock Vulnerability Falls Flat Against Hype (threatpost.com)

msm1267 writes: Weeks of anxiety and concern over the Badlock vulnerability ended today with an anticlimactic thud.

Badlock was the security boogeyman since the appearance three weeks ago of a website and logo branding the bug as something serious in Samba, an open source implementation of the server message block (SMB) protocol that provides file and print services for Windows clients.

As it turns out, Badlock was hardly the remote code execution monster many anticipated. Instead, it’s a man-in-the-middle and denial-of-service bug, allowing an attacker to elevate privileges or crash a Windows machine running Samba services.

SerNet, a German consultancy behind the discovery of Badlock, fueled the hype at the outset with a number of since-deleted tweets that said any marketing boost as a result of its branding and private disclosure of the bug to Microsoft was a bonus for its business.

For its part, Microsoft refused to join the hype machine and today in MS16-047 issued a security update it rated “Important” for the Windows Security Account Manager (SAM) and Local Security Authority (Domain Policy) (LSAD). The bulletin patches one vulnerability (CVE-2016-0128), an elevation of privilege bug in both SAM and LSAD that could be exploited in a man-in-the-middle attack, forcing a downgrade of the authentication level of both channels, Microsoft said. An attacker could then impersonate an authenticated user.

Comment Re:Yes, but no. (Score 1) 623

Worse, it would mean that Amazon is actually taking sides by taking action against a single candidate. Some people need to get a grip. I'm not a fan of Trump (or Hillary, and Bernie will be pushed off soon enough), but I will just vote for Gary Johnson. Everyone should just vote for who they want to win the election.

This year has seen a lot of people trying to shut down candidates, Trump in particular, but most of those aren't real people, they are paid by someone else with big money, pulling the strings. That makes them little more than puppets: tools of the rich. This is on par with prostitution, where your body is being rented to do the bidding of someone with deep enough pockets.

Comment Re:Side Effects (Score 3, Informative) 46

I have a friend with Friedrich's Ataxia, and CRISPR is one of the silver bullets she's praying for. FA cripples then kills you: wheel chair by 25, dead by 40 is often the case (it hardens the heart so it can't pump). While CRISPR has some unknowns and risks, having FA is a certainty. FA affects a single gene pair, so if you can replace either side of that gene, you have solved the problem, the mitochondria will start producing frataxin again, and the nerves will stop being slowly destroyed.

There are no treatments and since it is so rare (1 in 50,000 have it in the US, 1 in 30k in Europe, almost no one in Africa or Asia), few are investing in finding a cure or treatment. FA isn't the only orphan disorder like this. So yes, I'm quite happy to see CRISPR move forward.

Slashdot Top Deals

DEC diagnostics would run on a dead whale. -- Mel Ferentz

Working...