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Comment Re:Are you smarter than a Trump supporter? (Score 3, Informative) 522

What I don't understand is why Clinton supporters always resort to insults.

It's all they have. They can't run on her record or her predecessor's record, they have to know their policy prescriptions stink on ice and would be about as popular with the public as pralines-and-dick ice cream...so out come the insults.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Kapla: Spirals

Just building stuff, sometimes continuing the following week: Week 1 Week 2

The booklet had a spiral which took some time to figure out. Basically, 2 pieces in the middle, and 1 on each side of it, which makes it look really cool, and more importantly, supports the turned pieces. They do a slow turn though.

Comment Re:Tax (Score 5, Informative) 538

From what I can see, there's a correlation between being religious and being conservative, and also a correlation between being progressive and donating.

If by that second point you meant an inverse relationship, then yes. Amazon's description:

We all know we should give to charity, but who really does? In his controversial study of America’s giving habits, Arthur C. Brooks shatters stereotypes about charity in America-including the myth that the political Left is more compassionate than the Right. Brooks, a preeminent public policy expert, spent years researching giving trends in America, and even he was surprised by what he found. In Who Really Cares, he identifies the forces behind American charity: strong families, church attendance, earning one’s own income (as opposed to receiving welfare), and the belief that individuals-not government-offer the best solution to social ills. But beyond just showing us who the givers and non-givers in America really are today, Brooks shows that giving is crucial to our economic prosperity, as well as to our happiness, health, and our ability to govern ourselves as a free people. [Emphasis added.]

Submission + - SPAM: No More Readers? New Implant May Help Aging Eyes

Mr.Intel writes: Fading, close-up vision is one of the more vexing and ubiquitous consequences of growing older. Presbyopia happens to everyone when the lenses in the eyes lose their flexibility. "It's just a part of getting older," says Dr. Ralph Chu, an ophthalmologist in private practice in Bloomington, Minnesota. But that may be changing. In a little over a year, the FDA approved two new devices to help with age-related vision loss. The most recent to receive approval, the "Raindrop", is made mostly from water and works by reshaping the cornea helping the eye to focus better on close-up objects.

Both of the new implants, Raindrop and KAMRA, go into only one eye. The other eye will be for seeing distance, explains Dr. D. Rex Hamilton, director of the Laser Refractive Center at the Stein Eye Institute at UCLA, and a clinical professor of ophthalmology at the David Geffen School of Medicine. "So the other eye needs to have good distance vision without glasses," Hamilton says, adding that sometimes people have laser surgery to improve the distance vision in the eye that won't be getting an implant to improve vision close-up. Also, Hamilton notes, the implants aren't a "be all end all. They may work quite well for a period of time but a person's lenses will continue to change with age and, ultimately, the patient may need cataract surgery, which replaces the lens, improving both near and far vision, and lasts for the rest of the patient's life.

Link to Original Source

Comment Re:Surprised I'm still alive! (Score 1) 526

We were made to eat unprocessed (or less processed) foods, meat included. Before we started processing everything, we used to get a lot of our sugar from fruit, which doesn't cause your blood sugar to spike as much as processed sugar (particularly high fructose corn syrup). When it comes to starch, we're a lot better off getting it from sources where they haven't removed all of the fiber, like whole grain bread.

A lot of the processed foods we eat have had all the fiber taken out, presumably because people find the texture more pleasant, but we really need fiber with our sugar and starch.

Comment Re:Courage (Score 1) 761

Given the iMac was released in 1998, and the lightning connector in 2012 (4 years ago), the correct question would be: "How many USB Mice were there in 2002?" and the answer to that is: quite a few! Windows XP came out in 2001, and I distinctly remember new computers being delivered with USB mice and USB keyboards. For the record, USB 2.0 was released in 2000, and it's really with USB 2.0, that USB took off.

Comment Re: Lol (Score 1) 305

A 1.25 gallon tank plus only 25 MPG means I can't get from home to work without running out of traffic is really bad.

25? I bolted a 50cc 4-stroke onto an old bicycle once and was getting 100 mpg from it before the cheap-ass gearbox chewed itself up. You're not (legally) going to have something much bigger than that on a scooter. 25 mpg is down in four-wheeled conveyance territory; that's about what my cars get/have gotten in recent years.

User Journal

Journal Journal: An Lá 2

Bí go maith, a mhuirnín.

Comment Re:It's Sony - duh (Score 1) 467

What matters is the intent, mens rea, the will to steal, and the intent to permanently deprave the rightful owner of his use of the item. This is critical. Without, you could become a thief without even wanting to steal anything, by mistake and accident, and I hope we can agree that this is not the intent of the law!

Unfortunately, we seem to have picked up a bunch of laws where mens rea isn't taken into account. Try looking up mala prohibita. It's far from an ideal situation, but it is the situation as it stands today.

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