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Comment Some of this sounds perfectly rational (Score 1) 124

Ignoring messages (read: popups) "when going to close a web page"? Of course I'm going to ignore those--I don't think I've ever seen a legitimate security warning when I was trying to close a page, but I have seen a lot of sleazy attempts to prevent me from leaving someone's web site. What action is it that I'm performing by closing the web page that I might be making a mistake with? What alternative path is being suggested to me there, just leave the page up forever?

In the other direction, paying attention to warnings "after interacting with a web site" makes sense--if the site is lying to me about its identity or doing sleazy things with javascript, telling me about that lets me know that I should probably trust it less and at least think twice about providing sensitive information to it or downloading executables from it.

Comment Re:Driving yes, but charging? (Score 1) 990

I spend less of my time charging my EV than you spend filling your car's gas tank.

I arrive home, plug in and leave it. I don't have to stand by the car waiting for it to fill. In the morning, I unplug it. A few seconds to plug in and another few seconds to unplug. How long do you spend standing by your car at the gas station?

And that's irrelevant for PEOPLE IN APARTMENTS, which is where the thread started and what the grandparent's point about "time spent at the gas station" was relevant to.

Comment Re:Twister 1996 (Score 1) 260

The one that irked me (to the point that I remember it, anyway) was...that one Highlander movie with Adrian Paul that made it into theaters. I was a big fan of the TV series already; trailers had the villain doing a bunch of magic that adolescent-me thought would make him a unique threat to be faced. Movie comes out, nothing like that to be seen. The villain's most threatening move is hiding a dagger up his sleeve. Half the TV episodes had more impressive opponents.

Comment Re:Seems this topic is stuck in the roundabout. (Score 1) 364

I'm not sure that's actually true. If we were talking about a situation that occurs (for a given driver) ten times a day, I would agree that repeated practice would get you to the point that you would reflexively do the same thing you did the last hundred times....but "pedestrian teleported in front of my car and my only choice to avoid him is to drive off a cliff" isn't something that most people are ever going to encounter, much less encounter often enough to make automatic a response that matches what they'd do with careful consideration.

It doesn't matter what you say you'd do when confronted with the situation when you're sitting in philosophy 101.

Comment Re:Interesting idea (Score 5, Insightful) 400

I feel like there's an "agency" aspect to this that I haven't seen mentioned yet. Even if, overall, people are safer on transport they don't control (buses, airplanes), the fact that they have some control over the risk when they drive makes them feel like it's less risky even if it really isn't. "Those 1,000 car deaths were probably all distracted idiots or maniacs or drunks--I'm a better driver than that."

Comment Distrust of the source (Score 5, Insightful) 282

When I see a commercial make a claim about a problem, and the solution to that problem just happens to be "Buy our new product!".....yes, I would say that the proposed solution tends to make me view the claim about the problem more skeptically. That seems totally rational to me.

I don't see why this would be any different. If it sounds like someone is pushing the need for tighter (or looser) gun regulations, it's reasonable to question if they've cherry-picked their statistics about the problem to support their case.

Maybe f they'd had one source give a totally neutral statement about a problem, and then a different source suggest a solution, and managed to prevent the subjects from realizing that the experimenters were responsible for both statements...

Comment Re:Good timing for this suggestion NOT! (Score 1) 322

Bad analogy. What's happening in Ukraine is more like the USA supporting Canadian and/or Mexican rebels with an eye to picking up a province or two up north or a state or two down south"....

Hmm....interesting thought experiment. If the US DID try to pull something like that, do you think Russia (or China) would intervene? Should intervene? If they did intervene, would they be doing it out of self-interest, a desire to stick it to the US, or because they genuinely believe it's the right thing to do?

Comment Re:Not true (Score 1) 499

A lot of meal are simple to cook, like pasta and stuff, but if you want to eat healthy, then you will spend time : 1) buy fresh vegetables and fruit on regular basis 2) wash it 3) cut it and prepare it for a family and by the time you are finished, you are an hour out and the rest of your todo list is nowhere finished.

This has always been my experience. I see recipes that list themselves as "10 minutes preparation time!", and I have to think that they're either assuming my onions are starting out already chopped, or everyone else is much faster in the kitchen than I am.

Comment Re:Lazyness (Score 1) 926

Those laboratory marmosets were all like "Hey, man, we're going to hit the gym for a couple of hours, want to come?" but you were all "I already ordered a pizza and was going to play some League of Legends, you sure you don't want to stay and queue with me?" and the marmosets said "Eh, forget the gym, you've talked us into it."

Comment Re:Don't be evil (some of the time) (Score 1) 555

Your data transmissions should be treated, routed, carried at the same speed, as others provided by the carrier's own services, or the other users paying the same rates.

Stretching this to mean that you can run your own mail server or open your own web store on a residential connection was never part of net neutrality.

What? That's not a stretch at all, that's exactly what it means--your packets should be treated the same whether they're carrying a Youtube video, Facebook posts, data to/from World of Warcraft, or information from a server of your own.

Comment So convenient (Score 1) 312

I originally had all the concerns about DRM, eventually obsolete formats, inability to lend, not supporting local booksellers....but after getting an e-reader, they've pretty much all been trumped by one thing: I can set the book down and have the damn thing lay flat and readable no matter where I'm at in the book. No more trying to find something heavy to set on one side or the other of a hardcover until I'm within the middle 40%, no more setting a paperback facedown any time I want to use both hands at lunch. Almost all of my book-reading time these days seems to be while I'm out at lunch or dinner, so it's a big improvement for me. I think this feature also contributed to finally getting me to start going to the gym (at least occasionally), as I can still get some reading done there.

I've also enjoyed the space savings of not needing the physical books around, and the ability to purchase new books from home and have them immediately available, but lay-flat is the top reason why I frown a little any time I want a book and can't find it in e-book format.

Books-on-tape might be even more convenient for my situations, but the idea of being forced to read at someone else's pace just makes me shudder.

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