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Comment Re:I'm so out of touch (Score 2) 37

Wayland does in fact have support for resolution independence. By this I mean that if a program does nothing about the resolution of the screen, Wayland assumes it is drawing for approximately 100 dpi, and scales the image by 2 if the screen is 200dpi. I think it only does integer scaling but it may be up to the compositor implementation.

If a program actually claims it's drawing for the high-resolution display, then Wayland does not scale. The problem with X (and I think with Windows) was that there was no api so a program could tell the system that it is handling the high resolution, so the compositor had to assume it was.

Comment Damn (Score 4, Insightful) 251

Heads are going to roll all around after an event like this one.

Somebody will probably end up writing a book on what went on inside, because I imagine that the internal meetings had some serious drama involved.

I hope there's going to be a post-mortem at some point, because it would be very interesting to find out what went wrong in the end. Rogue manufacturer? Bad quality control? Maybe the phone doing something wrong with charging, as somebody suggested on reddit?

Comment Re:"free of snow and ice" (Score 1) 163

It's not going to be positive at all.

There's a set amount of energy to work with. The only thing solar panels do there is that now there's a shiny surface so part will be reflected away (making things worse), part will go to heat immediately (but perhaps less efficiently than a well made traditional road, with heat going to internals that eventually transmits to the ground underneath rather than the surface), and part will be stored for later.

Overall though, if a good black surface isn't melting the snow, a shinier surface isn't going to do better. The only upside this would have is being able to use power generated elsewhere or storing it for later, but melting ice electrically takes a brutal amount of power, and will need some seriously beefy cables which I doubt are there, and as for later, whatever batteries these have won't be enough.

Comment Re:welcome to python (Score 1) 148

Honestly the changes in Python 3 should not be any obstacle to porting code. Most of it winds up being a find and replace. The major difference is the use of unicode, and if your package really depends heavily on strings not being unicode, you probably did it wrong. The problem is that if one package that lots of people depend on has devs that just say, "I don't wanna," everything breaks down. And more than one package has devs like that.

At this point, if the Python community could make "porting" as simple as adding a header to a .py file, there would still be people that would refuse to do it.

The problem with Python 3 "unicode" is not that text is not Unicode. The problem is that *random binary data* is not Unicode, but when you read data from an unknown source, you MUST assume it is "random binary data". Trusting it to follow some pattern is by far the stupidest thing you can do.

In Python 2 you could put random binary data into a "string" and then write it to disk without any change, and no errors would be produced. Only if you tried to *display* the string would you get an exception. In Python 3 it will immediately throw an exception, at a completely useless point in your program (ie when you are reading data in, not when you are processing it). Changing every "string" to a "bytes" will "fix" it, but then you have to change the type of every single function that is called from "string" to "bytes", and so on, eventually replacing every single "string" in your program with "bytes". And you are out of luck if one of those api's is from a library that you don't control.

Python 3 will NEVER get accepted unless you can put totally arbitrary patterns of 8-bit data into a "string" and get them back out unchanged. All exceptions must be deferred until something actually tries to split the data into Unicode code points. Even then they should be providing a more useful iterator based api that returns an object that says "the code point is this" or "there is a UTF-8 parsing error here and the first byte is this".

Comment Re:An earthquake is an accident waiting to happen (Score 1) 130

I don't know if you are trying to make a joke, but global warming is not going to do too much to the earthquakes. Greenland is already rising steadily due to the loss of the glaciers from the last ice age. It is really slow and will still happen for tens of thousands of years. Even if all the current ice cap disappeared tomorrow it would, at best, speed this up a tiny amount (the current ice cap is a fraction of the ice age ice cap so the amount of lost mass is only a small change). The weight of the new ice added to the ocean is insignificant (if it raised the ocean 30 feet that would still only be a tiny fraction of mass increase, think about how deep the ocean is).

Comment Re: The Market Quickly Crowded with Competitors (Score 1) 50

3D TV is a very fiddly technology. You need to sit in the right position, you need special glasses or just the right angle, and your position doesn't influence the image. 3D is also that doesn't fundamentally change a movie. It has depth now, it's a really cool thing in some cases, but it's still the same movie.

An HMD is a completely different experience. The effect is perfect without fiddling. You can look around a corner. And it gives an amazing sense of immersion, which for some games is an excellent advantage.

For instance Elite: Dangerous is far easier to play in an HMD. To access the menus and ship interface all you need to do is to look in the right direction. If a ship flies out of your field of view, you just need to follow it with your head. Sure, all that can be done through keyboard or joystick controls, but it's far easier and far more intuitive to do it the same way you would if you were sitting in a cockpit.

Comment Re:Normally I'm pro regulation (Score 4, Insightful) 146

The vast majority of people, even the really smart ones working for the justice system aren't expert biologists able to evaluate the quality of a lab's work. Neither would they be granted enough access to actually run a proper evaluation, even if they did have the knowledge.

And what's the benefit to allowing a lab that produces incorrect results to keep operating?

We need both. Regulation ensures that every lab performs correctly, and the free market ensures the labs compete against each other on the price and services they offer. With both those things in place and working properly we can ensure you can't go wrong by choosing a lab, and just have to concentrate on finding one that does what you need at an acceptable price and speed.

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