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Comment Re:Are people still using that? (Score 1) 111

No, you seem to not get it. The "real" women are American, and hence are overwhelmingly obese. The trannies aren't.

If you guys find obesity attractive, then more power to you, but obesity is extremely unhealthy so from an evolutionary biology viewpoint, it's perfectly normal for a man to not be attracted to obese women.

Comment Re: Umm (Score 1) 376

The amount of voter fraud in the United States is exceedingly low so the whole voter ID laws are a solution in search of a problem.

Voter ID laws solve a very clear problem, just not the one their proponents claim.

There is also widespread evidence that such laws are designed to target democratic voters and that they tend to target the poor and minorities.

Yep, that's the problem: blacks, latinos and white trash voting too much. Voter ID isn't a complete solution, but it's a useful step. I'm sure Bannon has some ideas about the final solution.

Hmm... maybe that is what Trump meant when he claimed three million "illegals" voted for Hillary. He meant "people who shouldn't be allowed to vote", rather than "people who aren't citizens", the way the silly media interpreted the words.

Submission + - Disney Develops Room With 'Ubiquitous Wireless' Charging (cnet.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The scientific and tech arm of the entertainment giant Disney has built a prototype room with "ubiquitous wireless power delivery" that allows several devices to be charged wirelessly in much the way we get internet access through Wi-Fi. By tapping quasistatic cavity resonance, researchers discovered they could generate magnetic fields inside specially built structures to deliver kilowatts of power to mobile devices inside that structure. "This new innovative method will make it possible for electrical power to become as ubiquitous as WiFi," Alanson Sample, associate lab director & principal research scientist at Disney Research, told Phys.org. "This in turn could enable new applications for robots and other small mobile devices by eliminating the need to replace batteries and wires for charging." All you have to do is be in the room and your device will start charging automatically. And depending on where you are in the room, delivery efficiency can be as high as 95 percent, researchers said. There is one potential issue: you have to not mind being in a room constructed mostly of aluminum, that includes the walls, ceiling and floor. There's a copper pole in the middle of the room, and 15 discrete high quality factor capacitors that separate the magnetic field from the electric field.

Comment Re:FINALLY! (Score 1) 239

Well that's a post-hoc justification, if AMD can't compete in a market they can:

a) Make a comeback
b) Exit that market
c) Fail as a company

If it's a market full of competition b) and c) aren't a big deal but if it's the last competitor and it'll become a monopoly it's a pretty big deal. You can still 'vote with your wallet.' but in a one-party state it's not worth much. A boxer on the ropes doesn't need a knock-out punch to know he's in trouble. It's obvious to everyone, including themselves. And AMD has been diversifying into other markets and dancing on the ropes for quite some time now. Consider these two scenarios:

AMD Intel
(Bulldozer) (Sandy Bridge)
*buy Intel, AMD exits high end market*
(no offer) (Ivy Bridge - near monopoly rent, little innovation)
*buy Intel, no real choice*
(no offer) (Broadwell - near monopoly rent, little innovation)
*buy Intel, no real choice*
(no offer) (Haswell - near monopoly rent, little innovation)
*buy Intel, no real choice*
(no offer) (Skylake - - near monopoly rent, little innovation)
*buy Intel, no real choice*
(no offer) (Kaby Lake - near monopoly rent, little innovation)
*buy Intel, no real choice*

AMD Intel
(Bulldozer) (Sandy Bridge)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*
(poor offering) (better offering)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*
(poor offering) (better offering)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*
(poor offering) (better offering)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*
(poor offering) (better offering)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*
(poor offering) (better offering)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*

Would we be better off in the long run? I'd argue that quite possibly both AMD and Intel customers would be better off in the long run by occasionally taking one for the team, even if AMD customers got the short end of the stick every time. Except we're not a team, so we all do what's best for us individually and lose as a team of consumers. This is not the Intel/Pentium IV situation, when you kick the big incumbent to innovate that's entirely different. Like you, I'm cautiously optimistic that this is AMD's Hail Mary save in the last moment. But it was far from given than this would be the outcome.

Submission + - Software Vendor Who Hid Supply Chain Breach Outed (krebsonsecurity.com)

tsu doh nimh writes: Researchers at RSA released a startling report last week that detailed a so-called "supply chain" malware campaign that piggybacked on a popular piece of software used by system administrators at some of the nation's largest companies. This intrusion would probably not be that notable if the software vendor didn't have a long list of Fortune 500 customers, and if the attackers hadn't also compromised the company's update servers — essentially guaranteeing that customers who downloaded the software prior to the breach were infected as well. Incredibly, the report did not name the affected software, and the vendor in question has apparently chosen to bury its breach disclosure as a page inside of its site — not linking to it anywhere. Brian Krebs went and digged it up.

Comment Re:Are people still using that? (Score 2) 111

When I was using Tinder (up until a few months ago), I did notice a LOT of trans-girls (men dressing and acting like women). There used to be hookers, but those seem to have disappeared; perhaps Tinder got a lot better at dealing with that problem. But for the 25+ ages, and esp. the 30+ people, it's all real people AFAICT. But there are a lot of trannies, at least in my metro area, though they all seem to be between 25 and 30. The sad thing, however, is that the trannies are, on average, a lot prettier than the real women. American women these days really look awful.

Submission + - Scientists Seek To Reinstate Pluto As A Planet - And Many More

Rei writes: After several years of publicly complaining about the "bullshit" decision at the IAU redefining what comprises a planet, New Horizons programme head Alan Stern and fellow planetary geologists have put forth a new definition which they seek to make official, basing planethood on hydrostatic equilibrium. Under this definition, in addition to Ceres, Pluto and other Kuiper Belt objects, large moons like Titan and Europa, as well as our own moon, would also become planets; "planet" would be a physical term, while "moon" would be an orbital term, and hence one can have a planetary moon, as well as planets that orbit other stars or no star at all (both prohibited under the current definition).

The paper points out that planetary geologists already refer to such bodies as planets, citing examples such as a paper about Titan: “A planet-wide detached haze layer occurs between 300-350 km above the surface; the visible limb of the planet, where the vertical haze optical depth is 0.1, is about 220 km above the surface”

Submission + - Signal from Andromeda. Probable evidence of Dark matter. (spacefellowship.com)

William Robinson writes: NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has found a signal at the center of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy that could indicate the presence of the mysterious stuff known as dark matter. The gamma-ray signal is similar to one seen by Fermi at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy. The latest Fermi data shows the gamma rays in Andromeda are confined to the galaxy’s center instead of spread throughout. To explain this unusual distribution, scientists are proposing that the emission may come from several undetermined sources. One of them could be dark matter and another possible source for this emission could be a rich concentration of pulsars in Andromeda’s center. Scientists are excited that Fermi has detected a similar gamma-ray signature in both Andromeda and the Milky Way, scientists can use this information to solve mysteries within both galaxies.

Comment So essentially test rides with passengers (Score 4, Interesting) 104

All trips will include two Uber engineers in the front seats as safety drivers

Google has also done this several times as a PR stunt without the taxi fare, they let a legally blind man ride with them back in 2012. I would imagine the fare is pretty irrelevant anyway when you have an expensive test vehicle and two engineers to pay. So what's really new here that hasn't already been done 5 years ago? Is there any reason to believe that in 5 years it'll be any different? I understand it's difficult, but I'm getting tired of the hype that self-driving cars are right around the corner. Two safety drivers on every ride isn't exactly self-driving. Any bets on when you can actually get into the back of a self-driving car with no helpers, no license and have the car drive? I'm starting to guess 2030+ while like totally being just "a few years out" all the way...

Comment Re:Next headline (Score 1) 125

Next headline: College Student Arrested For Building Autonomous Car That Hit Something

And the next line: Insurance company refuses to cover damages, clean-up costs, hospital bills, loss of income due to disability and so on. Even if you do eventually win expect to spend a few years in court with a lawyer driving you into bankruptcy first. Also if you're arrested you have the right to a lawyer, not so much in civil court when the insurance company claims you broke the terms, I'm sure they have something in the wall of legalese that will apply.

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