Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
Transportation

US Regulators Seek To Reduce Road Deaths With Smartphone 'Driving Mode' (theguardian.com) 291

US regulators are seeking to reduce smartphone-related vehicle deaths with a new driving-safe mode that would block or modify apps to prevent them being a distraction while on the road. From a report on The Guardian:The US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) are to issue voluntary guidelines for smartphone makers, which will seek to restrict the apps and services accessible on a smartphone being used by a driver. US transport secretary Anthony Foxx said: "Your smartphone becomes so many different things that it's not just a communication device. Distraction is still a problem. Too many people are dying and being injured on our roadways." The NHTSA is hoping that Apple, Samsung and other popular smartphone manufacturers will adopt the guidelines in future smartphone and software releases. The so-called driving mode will block distractions such as social media, messages or email, stop the use of the keyboard for communication activities and also restrict access to websites, video and distracting graphics. The intention is that the driving mode will be adopted in a similar manner to the airplane mode common to most smartphones and connected devices, which restricts radio communications while airborne. Airplane mode has been a feature of smartphones since 2007.
The Internet

Tech Firms Seek To Frustrate Internet History Log Law (bbc.com) 85

Plans to keep a record of UK citizens' online activities face a challenge from tech firms seeking to offer ways to hide people's browser histories. Internet providers will soon be required to record which services their customers' devices connect to -- including websites and messaging apps. From a report on BBC: The Home Office says it will help combat terrorism, but critics have described it as a "snoopers' charter". Critics of the law have said hackers could get access to the records. "It only takes one bad actor to go in there and get the entire database," said James Blessing, chairman of the Internet Service Providers' Association (Ispa), which represents BT, Sky, Virgin Media, TalkTalk and others. "You can try every conceivable thing in the entire world to [protect it] but somebody will still outsmart you. "Mistakes will happen. It's a question of when. Hopefully it's in tens or maybe a hundred years. But it might be next week."

Comment Competitor to SlingTV? (Score 1) 45

This service sounds pretty much the same thing as what Dish is offering with Sling TV.

I actually cancelled cable and have now a couple of Nvidia Shield's with Sling TV. Works quite well; some channels provide on-demand, some channels allow you to watch programming from the last 24 hours, and of course. Works fine for us for now; I got the basic package plus blue package. You can watch up to three devices at the same time.

Comment Oh my. (Score 1) 469

"helps government agencies track down terrorists and uncover financial fraud,"

Other ethnic backgrounds not hired Palantir:
- North Korean
- Russians
- Iranians
- Cubans
- Chechens
- Former/current ISIS members

"Asians" may be a tad too broad. Chinese nationals? Hell, yes. I know of quite a few places that do something similar. The problem is that the idiots doing the screening cannot differentiate between a 2nd generation US citizen from Vietnamese or Hong Kong families, and someone who only a little while ago carried a nice red book and quoted the chairman.

What are the other 17 non-Asians? White, black, hispanic, pakistani, japanese, egyptian, etc?

Comment Encryption was expensive (Score 1) 125

Computationally that is, I don't think it would have flown in the early 90s and the adoption rate would have been the same it was with SSL (and TLS). It wasn't not so long ago that I actually had to provide resource impact reports on servers where everything would be encrypted. Nowadays (unless you deal with extreme large volumes), encrypting (using an symmetric key that is) doesn't have a significant impact. Web servers, load-balancers, etc can support it without breaking a sweat.

Comment Self-righterous bullshit; the "company" is pissed (Score 1) 80

If I was that Ziegler fellow I'd be consulting a lawyer. Spouting that shit publicly, verges (ha!) on defamation.

I'm not saying what Ziegler was right, although in this day and age, one should show very little loyalty to any corporation because they basically claim "people are our most precious resource" but treat employees like shit.

I've seen staff where I worked, take a few weeks off or take a leave of absence. What they do, is try another job and see if it suits them. They quit the original job, or they quit the new job. I'm not going to judge people too much when they do this, hell, the company is always evaluating if they should terminate you.

At this moment I have two contracts. Place A does not know of place B, but place B knows of me working at place A and they don't care. The type of work is very different and they're not in the same sector. Sure place A could claim some crap, but if they do, I just have to walk and move on to the next gig. They can claim some BS excuse anyways, doesn't matter.

Slashdot Top Deals

Disc space -- the final frontier!

Working...