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Comment Re:Do literary awards matter? (Score 1) 252

Before I buy a book, I find out it exists. I usually do that through articles, blogs and the like - and they tend to favor books which won awards.

So no, I do not directly check that. I do not care. But I will probably not find out a book is worth reading unless it has won an award, or is from an author who has previously won one. There are exceptions, but they are not that many.

Comment Re:How does it compare? (Score 1) 400

To generalize, the right time to use objects is when you have an object oriented language, so that you have polymorphism, iteration and extendability. I use those a lot. The right tool for the right job.

Just providing object access does not really add much, except complexity.

And sure, it's good for something. It's just a lot more complicated to do difficult things when constrained by provided objects and expected interaction. Specialized interfaces with limited extendability are not a step forward.

Comment Re:How does it compare? (Score 1) 400

That sound you heard was the point whoosing right past.

The point isn't possibility of emitting text.

The point is:

"This is the Unix philosophy: Write programs that do one thing and do it well. Write programs to work together. Write programs to handle text streams, because that is a universal interface."

Comment Re:How does it compare? (Score 1) 400

"Parsing"? What other tools have you been using?

And the fact that everything is an object is not very helpful unless there is consistent polymorphism and iterability.

As to easily extend the shell, you might have heard something like this:

"This is the Unix philosophy: Write programs that do one thing and do it well. Write programs to work together. Write programs to handle text streams, because that is a universal interface."

This philosophy was first written down in 1978. Good of Microsoft to finally start catching up to it. Too bad they think it's better done with proprietary object interfaces than with plain text, but maybe the next iteration will get there.

Comment Re:You might be right, but "what is your name?" (Score 1) 209

The law makes no such distinction. If you are a suspect of a crime, and the testimony is in pursuit of the case, you are allowed to refuse to answer any question at all, with a few well defined exceptions.

And yes, one of those well defined exceptions is you may not refuse to give your name.

You distinguish between questions by them being either one of the well defined questions you must answer, or any other question, in which case you do not have to answer.

That is the law. And it doesn't care if the testimony admits a crime or not. It cares if it is attached to a criminal case or not.

Comment Re:Not new - safe combos.Have to prove that you kn (Score 1) 209

It is not illegal to park your car at home at 7 AM in the morning either, but if the court asks you if you did that you have the right not to answer.

Your reasoning is a red herring. The point isn't admission of crime. The point is giving testimony. And answering questions about what you did at a certain time, or what password you set on your computer, is testimony.

Comment Re: Could have been a contender (Score 5, Interesting) 211

In 1995, a kid in my dorm showed me this new OS called Be. Running on a PowerMac 603 with a single cpu and 16mb of ram, he showed me how Be could play 6 video files simultaneously. Mapped to 6 faces of a cube. And you could spin the cube around via the mouse while all 6 videos were playing. Never any input lag, or dropped frames. It was a thing of beauty.

Comment This demands legal action (Score 1) 564

Microsoft have been wantonly abusing their customers with these non-consentual updates to Windows 10. This should not stand. There needs to be strong legal action against this sort of thing. Let's start by calling it what it is: #WindowsUpdateRape.

I didn't consent to the upgrade, I repeatedly said no, Microsoft repeatedly re-pushed the same upgrader and nagware to my machine. The best way to describe this behavior is "update rape".

Comment Re:Not surprised (Score 1) 118

The stable ABI is what created most of the mess in Windows. Listing this as a shortcoming of Linux shows you have no idea what you're talking about. A huge mass of badly maintained binary only drivers is not a good thing, it's an incredible liability.

Drivers need to be maintained. The only way to ensure that is to have their maintenance be part of the kernel maintenance. A stable ABI would directly counteract this.

And Microsoft keeps doing transgressions. They haven't washed out their stripes. They've just been slapped on the wrist enough to not be blatant about it.

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