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Comment Re:Call me crazy... (Score 1) 89

My BLU Studio Energy 2 wasn't particularly huge (though a touch heavy), had a 5000 mah battery and lasted for quite a bit.

I got 24 hours of on battery (at 18% left still) with 8.5 hours of screen on time.

It also had a pigtail for USB otg charging, I could revive someone else's phone and still get a solid day of regular heavy use.

On most phones the screen is the highest consuming part, and there's limits to how much that can be reduced (in the end, brightness is energy).

I think you misjudge how big/small a battery is needed to reach this goal, the makers simply don't seem to care, and only do the big batteries on the phablet sized phone.

Comment Re:How do they compare? (Score 1) 151

There's more to VR though (doesn't mean it will work out, but it may).

3D TV was offering nothing but depth perception, it showed the exact same thing as 2d TV.

With VR there's a new way to interact.

I'm not saying it will take off, I haven't even used it, but I do think there's a chance. With the TV no killer app could even be made, with VR, there's at least potential that someone developes a killer app.

Comment Re:nothing had, nothing lost (Score 1) 490

You don't mention anything about a car, hope the places you go all have good public transit.

I don't own one and only live and work in places that have acceptable public transport (not really hard to plan for honestly), yes. I am going to be acquiring one this year.

Tools for your profession?

Even when I was doing hands on work, those tools were provided by the company. Unless you're a contractor, it's not likely you're going need those?

What's that! Oh right, you don't create anything of value, at least nothing tangible.

I sell stuff I can do without when I move. However, in my family where we typically move a lot, I know some of them move with a few more things than I do, typically using the postal system posting a pallet of things to keep costs low. Just make adjustments to the method that fits your circumstances.

Then again, you're probably not that interested in this life style, are you?

Comment Re:Stuck (Score 1) 490

how often have you actually met students that went to the point of contacting the organisations in the fields that they want to get into when they graduate and asked what they wanted minimum and what would be a recommended to obtain as far as qualifications, certifications etc. for someone with no experience for consideration?

I realize doesn't say what I meant. I meant to say there, was to find out what should they work towards for graduation rather than after they graduated.

Comment Re:Stuck (Score 1) 490

Did you grow up in the USA?

Nope, I grew up in a few European countries though, I moved around in my childhood too.

You must have been quite the visionary thinker and rebellious spirit to be able to make an accurate assessment of contemporary economic conditions and set off in a completely non-traditional direction after high school.

I know you state this sarcastically, but sometimes it genuinely feels that way when I look at my colleagues, which is the sad state of affairs.

Most kids in the USA are repeatedly told that a college education is critical to their future success.

It really is the same thing over here in Europe. Yet, when you look at many who graduate out of university with qualifications, they can't even get work most of the time unless they some how managed to land a summer job in a related field (in which case they can sneak into the industry through claiming 'experience', which often isn't even dependant at all on their university qualfiications).

For the vast majority of people, the only options are taking on debt or serving in the military for a few years.

I have a friend in New York who is took the same path I did, which is to get a couple of certifications in the fields he wants to work in (that can be done in a month of intense study) in rather than spending years in university and he's been very succesful too.

but I think it's a little harsh to blame people for the "stupid decision" of going to college when they've endured years of well-meaning propaganda telling them it's the right thing to do.

Honestly, the typical situation I see is that people don't even know what they want to do, so they don't setup plans to work towards anything, which leads to this very problem. Universities are great, but if you say "Imma study computers", get into computer science and then get confused why you can't get a job in network administration because you've got a qualification that gives you practical knowledge for research work but are missing the science degrees to be accepted in any research institute and some how expected that it should be enough to get a network administration job with no experience or knowledge... Sorry, but, I wouldn't say these people are blameless.

The "well-meaning propoganda" also wants you to think about what you want to do and plan ahead for it, along with doing basic research, which is something I did thanks to that propoganda (but something I find next to nobody else does in my generation). Now, of course I'm generalizing here, but, how often have you actually met students that went to the point of contacting the organisations in the fields that they want to get into when they graduate and asked what they wanted minimum and what would be a recommended to obtain as far as qualifications, certifications etc. for someone with no experience for consideration?

Of all the companies I talked to, none of them told me to get an "computer science degree", "arts degree" nor "women's studies" (why are "women's studies" even so popular in the UK and Belgium right now?).

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