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Comment Re:Weirdly specific statement (Score 1) 23

The significance of this is Elon Musk, who is the self-driving Uber of dot.com billionaires and is the hero of our times.

Well, I knew Steve Jobs well enough, and have met a few civilian astronauts and a bunch of other rich people. None of the others seem to have done so much for the long-term future of the human race as Musk has in leading the path to more affordable spaceflight.

Comment Re:Clean OS install (Score 1) 325

I use optical media for installs, too.

Mostly because they're a more convenient (and better supported than USB sticks) way to build a system onto a fresh(ly wiped) machine.

Also because they're an easy way to insure I didn't accidentally carry over any data from the pre-wipe configuration or the machine I used to download, or got hit with a "catch the machine before it updates" attack while net-loading or updating from the distribution version to the latest bugfixes. (I go to the net for the initial update through an external firewall machine with tight reach-out-only rules.)

Yes, it's not a defence against some of the NSA or "remote-administration feature" style of attacks, through the BIOS, drive firmware, CPU-vendor silicon "management engines", persistent threat malware on the download machine, etc. But it's a start. (Also: If those are any good they keep hiding, so at least they stay out of my way while I'm trying to get some work done. B-b )

Comment Re:Never that specific program (Score 1) 267

Don't forget to take the platter out and smash it up whichever way you want. If the NSA can get the data off a drive that's being zeroed several times and platter smashed up, they deserve a trophy.

Grind it into dust.

Smashing the platter helps some. But taking it out of the drive just saves them a step.

When a surface has been overwritten a couple times you're not going to have much luck trying to read it with the ordinary heads, even with tweaked signal and head-positioning electronics.

But a scanning magnetic-force microscope makes the last several layers of writing visible to the naked eye (observing the false-color image on a monitor or printed page).

Comment Re:Too secure for insecure? (Score 0) 267

Hillary did do something wrong but the punishment for it would never be jail time. People keep focusing on this shouting lock her up. The worst she would have endured if she was a normal member of the state department would be a removal from her job and revocation of any security clearance.

And revocation of retirement benefits. And a felony conviction, with the resulting future denial of a number of civil rights (such as the right to posses a gun) and - yes - federal prison time.

Are you saying that the government would never enforce some of the more severe portions of the law? They seem to enforce it just fine when dealing with low-level functionaries (or even high-level officials who happen to be conservative.)

There is entirely too much corruption throughout our government.

Yep.

We need to fix campaign finance in a big way.

Yes - by completely repealing any campaign finance legislation at any level.

Buying advertisement is political speech. That, even more than any other forms of speech, is precisely one of the rights that is recognized and protected by the First Amendment. (It just happens purchasing advertisements enables the "speaker" to talk to more people than he can by standing on a soapbox in the park.)

Campaign financing laws are bait-and-switch. They claim to level the playing field, blocking the deep-pocket guys and the incumbents from having an advantage over the ordinary citizens and upstart challengers. But they actually penalize the grass-roots organizers and challengers by imposing complex red tape and arcane limits and requirements with draconian penalties for non-compliance (which incumbents' and professional lobbying organizations already know how to handle - or have the financial backing to challenge in court).

They're incumbent protection laws. Which is exactly what you should expect them to be. They were written by incumbents.

Comment Re:Sixty Years Ago... (Score 1) 23

Well, it beats making them into the world's most complicated airplanes as with the space shuttle. SpaceX has proven that they can do vertical landings of the first stage intact onto both land and a seagoing barge; after a trip out of the atmosphere and to about 1/5 of orbital velocity but not into orbit. They plan to do a parachute-less vertical landing of the Dragon capsule after a heat-shield re-entry. That turns out to be far less expensive and complicated than a space plane. It does turn out we need a lifting body for much larger vehicles. It still doesn't have to be a plane, though.

We don't need wings.

Comment Re:massive parallel processing=limited application (Score 1) 107

On a 8-core machine, a processor will be placed into a wait queue roughly 7 out of 8 times that it needs access.

You just snuck into your analysis the assumption that every core is memory saturated, and I don't think that all the memory path aggregates in many designs until the L3 cache (usually L1 not shared, L2 perhaps shared a bit). The real bottleneck ends up being the cache coherency protocol, and cache snoop events, handled on a separate bus, which might even have concurrent request channels.

I think in Intel's Xeon E5 line-up there are single-ring and bridged double-ring SKUs for forwarding dirty cache lines from one cache to another (and perhaps all memory requests). This resource can also drown for many workloads.

In many systems, you have all these cores running tasks which are fairly well isolated (not much cache conflict), except they all want to be able to allocate as much memory as they need from a giant memory space (e.g. a TB of DRAM) so they fundamentally have to fall through to a shared memory allocation framework.

You can learn a lot about the challenges involved by following the winding path of something like jemalloc as increasing concurrency levels expose yet another degeneracy.

The real problem with this field is that there isn't a single, simple story like the one you tried to tell. There are usually dozens of ways to skin the cat, each with completely different scaling stories, with different sets of engineers who are good as tweaking or debugging those stories.

At this point, what you have is a fragile coordination problem between your solution space, your architecture, and the engineers you employ, forcing ambitious ventures to crack out the golden recipe: pour in seven cement mixers full of head hunters, one 55-gallon oil drum of exclamation marks, a metric butter tonne of job perks, and agitate appropriately.

Comment So you have to disclose it to the government (Score 1) 29

30.8 5G Provider Cybersecurity Statement Requirements.

(a) Statement. Each Upper Microwave Flexible Use Service licensee is required to submit to the Commission a Statement describing its network security plans and related information, ...

So the applicant has to publish his whole security architecture in order to get a license.

On one hand this conforms to the best practices recommendations of the security community: Expose the algorithm to analysis and keep the security in the keying secrets.

On the other hand this gives the government the opportunity to pick-and-chose only those systems it can break.

Oh, gee. Which way will it work?

Comment Same model NAME! (Score 1) 31

Latest phone supported is the international version of the Galaxy S III (I9300) ... Note: The U.S. version of Galaxy S III is a different motherboard and chip - the same model number on a different device.

The same model NAME on a different device. Model number is different, which is how you tell for sure you got the right one.

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