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Comment Re:BULLSHIT (Score 1) 148

You are correct. There is a section of the document that reads like they created some, but the original paper makes it clear, this was all in simulation. I withdraw my comment.

Quoting from the original paper ( http://advances.sciencemag.org... ):

"To understand this difference, we built full atomic models of the 3D graphene assembly in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations by mimicking the synthesis of the porous material. Large-scale simulations based on a reactive force field (22–24) are performed to simulate the process of fusing graphene flakes together into the 3D assembly"

Comment Re:Oversold (Score 2) 148

I withdraw my comment. You are correct... the whole process was done though simulation.

Quoting from the original paper ( http://advances.sciencemag.org... ):

"To understand this difference, we built full atomic models of the 3D graphene assembly in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations by mimicking the synthesis of the porous material. Large-scale simulations based on a reactive force field (22–24) are performed to simulate the process of fusing graphene flakes together into the 3D assembly"

Comment Re:Oversold (Score 1) 148

They created a bit of the new graphene structure -- not much, but enough to measure the properties of it. Then they did more testing of it in simulation. But what they discovered along the way is that the new geometry was a useful geometry for a wide range of substances, so they were able to test the geometric structural properties using plastic.

Comment Re:BULLSHIT (Score 1) 148

The MIT link makes it very clear that they actually created this new structure in actual graphene. They did not create much of it, but enough to get its structural properties, then they did the rest of the work in simulation. They go on to say that the new configuration is a stronger 3D configuration for many materials, which is why they were able to do additional large scale work on the *geometry* using plastic. https://news.mit.edu/2017/3-d-... In short, yes, they actually produced the new structure, and they actually did do new work.

Comment Re:Of course they do (Score 1) 34

Plausible doesn't mean proof. With no verifiability of the story, it should be treated as Internet spam. CITATION NEEDED. If you need anonymity, use a public proxy like a known journalist who can vet your story and then post for you. Yes, that's a lot of work to go through for a slashdot post, but without it, it's just Internet noise. You might as well not even post.

Comment Re:Meal breaks (Score 1) 255

In the USA, most of our laws are enforced through civil court action -- laws like workers rights give the worker the right to sue if the law isn't followed. We don't have a police force going around investigating most of our civil regulations. The workers bringing a lawsuit like this is how the system is *designed* to work. It generally provides the right balance... rather than the government injecting itself into all our economic and social relationships, the people involved are free to negotiate a system that works for them and only appeal to the government when no reasonable accord can be reached or when one side just goes too far. It is the social equivalent of kids yelling for the parents to come resolve things... you don't want the government to be constantly monitoring because they have to enforce all the rules when they get involved ("fine... everyone go to your rooms") and can disrupt a lot of what is working.

Comment Re:Environment Trumps money! (Score 2) 263

Look at the history of most of the world's failed republics and see how they failed. Based on the history of Italy, Spain, a whole lot of South and Central America, and more than one African republic, it's not an unreasonable position to see Trump as a major threat. The historical analogues are why so many of us were concerned about his rise during the campaign... he casts doubt on basic facts to build up conspiracy theories, he asserts truth rather than proving it, and he takes criticism poorly. He is a propaganda machine for the 21st century. We should be quite concerned about Trump. But more, we should be concerned about Trump's successor. Trump is a force that can bend all the bars even while being a good guy. But those bars stay bent for the next person behind him.

Comment Re:Am I the only one that sees the root cause? (Score 1) 207

Yeah, but the whole point is to PREVENT anyone from doing something "Flash like". We don't want programmable ads -- that's untrusted code. If you can't communicate your ad with a static image, a video, and a "click for more info" link, you need a better ad dept... if your product is so bad that the only way you can get people to buy it is with invasive advertising, maybe the world is better off without your doohickey.

Comment Re:Next step... (Score 1) 155

Ok, that makes sense... but why do you need the arb clause instead of just going to small claims court or civil court? I understand wanting the arb clause, but mandating it when someone else doesn't want to give up their rights to court review is something that I generally oppose in other contexts, so I'm curious why it matters so much in your context.

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