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Comment The management unit in all intel processors (Score 5, Interesting) 100

It seems to me that having a chip, the management unit, in all intel processors that sits above even a hypervisor and can read all memory, have it's own connection to the network, runs java code, and is software reprogrammable, is basically the wet dream of root kits. it's invisible to anything you run on the CPU but sees all and tells all.

Comment Re:Digital Rights? (Score 2) 201

Steam's DRM only works because games have a finite shelf life. If my copy of Portal 2 stops working in ten years when Steam shuts down, I won't mind. If I purchase books and they stop working at any point for any reason, I will be upset.

Comment Re:Digital Rights? (Score 5, Informative) 201

If I create some original digital content should I not have the right to set the terms of use and distribution? If someone doesn't agree with the terms they do not have the right to circumvent the terms just because they can.

Nice thought, but no! The rights of buyers are enshrined in law, just as the rights of content creators are. For example, if you want to prevent a buyer from later selling it, that's not legal. Yet that's what DRM lets you do. You can also use DRM to block copying beyond the life of copyright, which may not be illegal, but is certainly unethical.

I'm not sure if you can sell a product and set terms of use at all. Certainly you can set terms when you provide a service or make an agreement beyond a simple sale, but the grocery store cannot tell me how to use or not use the zuccini I just bought. (Perhaps they could, but they would have absolutely no legal grounds to enforce it.) DRM lets you control your customers in ways the legal system does not.

Comment Re:I've noticed that, but something else interesti (Score 1) 156

Those aren't errors in the GPS, but the data it's working with.

I'm curious what you'd rank as an 'error in the GPS'. I completely glossed over other classes of 'error'; such as the GPS guessing which way you are facing on a road when you start a trip so you drive six feet and then it recalculates a new route based on the fact that you are going the other direction but that's just 'bad data too'. Or then there are the times its positional reckoning is off -- so it tells you to turn but you are actually a block away from where it thinks you are but that's just 'bad data' too.

Are those errors in the GPS, Or in the data its working from...it seems to be a distiction without a difference to me.

We validate what the GPS is telling us to do, but we don't ignore it's instructions and plan our own path. If one can't turn left, they pass the turn and wait for the GPS to figure things out.

As often as not, it simply reroutes you around the block back to the same intersection you couldn't use the first time. If you are lucky it'll at least have you approach it from a new angle so you can legally turn... i've been unlucky on many occasions. And if the road is simply closed for construction or something you are boned when it does that.

If you can't get in the correct lane in time, again, no panic, just keep driving until the GPS recalculates.

Yeah, that's usually where the GPS starts insisting you make illegal U-turns at major intersections, or emergency vehicle access roads, etc...

Comment Charitable crime-fighting (Score 1) 297

"$450 billion ($1,800 per resident) per year from 1987–1990."

Yeah, and the next sentence explains that figure as: "These losses included $18 billion in medical and mental health care spending, $87 billion in other tangible costs, and $345 billion in pain, suffering, and reduced quality of life."

Different ways to count it can result in vastly different numbers — depending on what one wishes to demonstrate, ha-ha... The point remains, though, the cost of crime, however you count it, is still below the "commie socialist programs" that serviscope_minor attempted to justify.

And, the "war on poverty" isn't solely about reducing crime

Of course, it is not! Moreover, I argue, that it is not about reducing crime at all. It is about genuine compassion for some and the ability to spread the wealth around for others. That "spreading" of the wealth of captive taxpayers is pure unadulterated tyranny, of course, and the folks advocating it usually have a vast conflict of interest.

The overhead of charities ranges from 15% to as much as 70% — with government's operations being on the greater side of it. It is an incredibly lucrative and powerful position to be in control of spending even $1 billion, even if a mere $150 million of it are yours to dispense on the "overhead". With $800 billion per year you can find words, sponsor poems, finance movies and other artworks, and even find a smooth talking nincompoop, who will sincerely protect your trough, while denouncing opponents as greedy and egoistic bastards...

Comment Re: Presumption of innocence (Score 1) 480

Thank you for the compliment, however foul-mouthed, but... With that freedom to endanger oneself, comes the responsibility to pay for one's own healthcare and/or disability. Pay for it, or beg other people's charity — with Pauper's Oath, etc. — but not vote to force others to pay for one's follies.

I sure hope, you are just as prepared to agree with this...

Comment Libertarianism 101 (Score 1) 297

Among those laws was the 1979 Department of Education Organization Act that established that entity.

Yep. As I said: a mission creep. Government looking, what else it can do...

The rules are simple. If (what seems like) a problem:

  • does not endanger the nation's very survival;
  • can be solved by private entities — commercial or charitable;

then the government must not touch it.

For the government to violate this principle is tyranny — taxpayer's money is confiscated to pay for things, he would not have paid for voluntarily.

And, like all other tyrannies, it is also inefficient. Your own example of public education is an ongoing disaster: per-pupil costs of public schools have quadrupled since the 1960-ies (inflation-adjusted), but 70% of the 8th-graders still can not be said to be "proficient" in reading.

Space-exploration is fascinating — leave it to Musk, Bezos, and Branson. They spend their own monies on it...

Comment Scale it... (Score 1) 255

Who really cares if I can get a loop to run in 800ns instead of 1500ns

Indeed. A human being can not even perceive a difference between 1 millisecond and 1 microsecond.

But, repeated a million times, the former turns into 15 minutes, whereas the latter is still merely a second. Food for thought...

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