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Cloud

Submission + - Office 2013: Microsoft Cloud Era Begins In Earnest (businessweek.com)

snydeq writes: "Microsoft's release of Office 2013 represents the latest in a series of makeover moves, this time aimed at shifting use of its bedrock productivity suite to the cloud. Early hands-on testing suggests Office 2013 is the 'best Office yet,' bringing excellent cloud features and pay-as-you-go pricing to Office. But Microsoft's new vision for remaining nimble in the cloud era comes with some questions, such as what happens when your subscription expires, not to mention some gray areas around inevitable employee use of Office 2013 Home Premium in business settings."
Perl

Submission + - Perl Isn't Going Anywhere -- For Better Or Worse (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Deep End's Paul Venezia waxes philosophical about Perl stagnancy in IT. 'A massive number of tools and projects still make the most out of the language. But it's hard to see Perl regaining its former glory without a dramatic turnaround in the near term. As more time goes by, Perl will likely continue to decline in popularity and cement its growing status as a somewhat arcane and archaic language, especially as compared to newer, more lithe options. Perhaps that's OK. Perl has been an instrumental part of the innovation and technological advancements of the last two decades, and it's served as a catalyst for a significant number of other languages that have contributed heavily to the programming world in general.'"
Government

Submission + - Unseen, All-Out Cyber War On The U.S. Has Begun (infoworld.com) 1

snydeq writes: "Security pros and government officials warn of a possible cyber 9/11 involving banks, utilities, other companies, or the Internet, InfoWorld reports. 'A cyber war has been brewing for at least the past year, and although you might view this battle as governments going head to head in a shadow fight, security experts say the battleground is shifting from government entities to the private sector, to civilian targets that provide many essential services to U.S. citizens. The cyber war has seen various attacks around the world, with incidents such as Stuxnet, Flame, and Red October garnering attention. Some attacks have been against government systems, but increasingly likely to attack civilian entities. U.S. banks and utilities have already been hit.'"
Java

Submission + - Java madness: Is Oracle neglecting customers it picked up from Sun? (infoworld.com) 5

tsamsoniw writes: "Mere days after Oracle rolled out a fix for the latest Java zero-day vulnerabilities, an admin for an Underweb hacker forum put code for a purportedly new Java exploit up for sale for $5,000. Though unconfirmed, it's certainly plausible that the latest Java patch didn't do the job, based on an analysis by the OpenJDK community. Maybe it's high time for Oracle to fix Java to better protect both its enterprise customers and the millions of home users it picked up when it acquired Sun."
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft's Worst Missteps Of All Time (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "DOS 4.0, Zune, and Windows 8 are but a few of the landmarks among 25 years of failures Redmond-style, writes InfoWorld's Woody Leonhard in a round-up of Microsoft's 13 worst missteps of all time. 'Over the years, Microsoft's made some incredibly good moves, even if they felt like mistakes at the time: mashing Word and Excel into Office; offering Sabeer Bhatia and cohorts $400 million for a year-old startup; blending Windows 98 and NT to form Windows 2000; sticking a weird Israeli motion sensor on a game box; buying Skype for an unconscionable amount of money. (The jury's still out on the last one.) Along the way, Microsoft has had more than its fair share of bad mistakes; 2012 alone was among the most tumultuous years in Microsoft history I can recall. This year you can bet that Redmond will do everything in its power to prove 2012 naysayers wrong. To do so, Microsoft must learn from the following dirty baker's dozen of its most dreck-laden decisions, the ones that have had the very worst consequences, from a customer's point of view.'"
China

Submission + - Chinese Smartphone Invasion Begins (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Tech giants Apple, Google, and Microsoft were no-shows at CES this week in Las Vegas, which worked out just fine for Chinese vendors looking to establish a name for themselves with U.S. consumers, InfoWorld reports. 'Telecom suppliers Huawei and ZTE, in particular, have set their sights on breaking into the U.S. market for smartphones and tablets. ... Whether these Chinese imports can take on the likes of Apple and Samsung remains to be seen, but as Wired quotes Jeff Lotman, the CEO of Global Icons, an agency that helps companies build and license their brands: "The thing that's amazing is these are huge companies, and they have a lot of power, but in the United States nobody has heard of them and they're having trouble gaining traction, but it's not impossible. Samsung was once known for making crappy, low-end phones and cheap TVs. Now they're seen as a top TV and smartphone brand."'"
Programming

Submission + - Who Controls Vert.x: Red Hat, VMware, Neither? (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Simon Phipps sheds light on a fight for control over Vert.x, an open source project for scalable Web development that 'seems immunized to corporate control.' 'Vert.x is an asynchronous, event-driven open source framework running on the JVM. It supports the most popular Web programming languages, including Java, JavaScript, Groovy, Ruby, and Python. It's getting lots of attention, though not necessarily for the right reasons. A developer by the name of Tim Fox, who worked at VMware until recently, led the Vert.x project — before VMware's lawyers forced him to hand over the Vert.x domain, blog, and Google Group. Ironically, the publicity around this action has helped introduce a great technology with an important future to the world. The dustup also illustrates how corporate politics works in the age of open source: As corporate giants grasp for control, community foresight ensures the open development of innovative technology carries on.'"
Hardware

Submission + - Open Source Wins Big In InfoWorld Technology Awards (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: The InfoWorld Test Center has announced its Technology of the Year Award winners, chosen from hands-on testing of technologies aimed at end-users, developers, IT pros, and the businesses they serve. Pure open source projects and commercial products rooted in open source proved their mettle, accounting for nearly a third of the winners in categories ranging from mobile devices to cloud services. As for Windows 8? Not a winner.
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - Developer Divide: 19 Generations Of Computer Programmers (infoworld.com) 2

snydeq writes: From punch cards to JavaScript, computing history owes everything to the generations of develoeprs and engineers who have programmed the machines. 'Each developer generation has a distinctive flavor, often defined by a programming language or technology. They burst out with newborn fervor before settling into a comfortable middle age. They may not be on the top of the pop charts after a few years, but they're often still kicking because software never really dies. These new technologies often group programmers by generation. When programmers enter the job market and learn a language, they often stick with the same syntax for life — or at least as long as they can before having to make a switch. It's not that it's hard to learn a new language; they're all pretty similar underneath. It's just that you can often make more money with the expertise you have, so the generations live on. Here is our guide to some of the more dominant tech generations in computer history, as embodied by the programmers who gave them life.'
Programming

Submission + - Roll-Your-Own Dev Projects To Avoid (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: Andrew C. Oliver warns that rolling your own code can often be a waste of time and money. 'Many developers like to create software from scratch, even when there's perfectly good reusable code from other projects, open source, or even commercial products available to do the job. ... Whatever the reason, rolling your own code can be a waste of time and effort, as well as an opportunity for bugs to creep in — after all, new code is more likely to have bugs than existing code that's been reviewed and tested,' Oliver writes, offering a look at nine types of software projects that really shouldn't be roll-your-own efforts.
Iphone

Submission + - Apple iPhone Infringes On Sony, Nokia Patents (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: A federal jury in Delaware has found Apple's iPhone infringes on three patents held by MobileMedia, a patent-holding company formed by Sony, Nokia and MPEG LA, InfoWorld reports. The jury found that the iPhone directly infringed U.S. patent 6,070,068, which was issued to Sony and covers a method for controlling the connecting state of a call, U.S. patent 6,253,075, which covers call rejection, and U.S. patent 6,427,078, which covers a data processing device. MobileMedia has garnered the unflattering descriptor "patent troll" from some observers. The company, which was formed in 2010, holds some 300 patents in all.
Microsoft

Submission + - 9 Windows Start Menus for Windows 8 (infoworld.com) 1

snydeq writes: InfoWorld's Serdar Yegalulp provides a roundup of nine Windows Start menu alternatives for Windows 8. 'Search as you might, you won't find a single bigger source of ire in Windows 8 than the new Modern UI (aka "Metro") Start menu. ... Windows 8's Start menu has thrown many people — seasoned veterans, early adopters, and new users alike — for a curve. And Microsoft has been adamant that the old Start menu is gone for good. But where Microsoft doesn't go with Windows, others almost always do. Even before Windows 8 was released to manufacturing, various third parties were marketing add-ons that promised to restore a little (or a lot) of the classic Start menu goodness to Windows 8.'
IT

Submission + - Geek Management Myths (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: Managing talented techies can be tricky business. Unfortunately, too many managers resort to time-worn stereotypes: Techies eat nothing but pizza, care about nothing but technology, live by night, are barely able to communicate with other bipeds, and are the antithesis of creative. 'The trouble is in separating the myths from the wisdom when it comes to getting the most from highly trained technology professionals. Here are eight commonly held misperceptions about managing the techie set. If you're among the (mis)managed, perhaps you can persuade your boss to read this.'

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