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Comment Re: Not Really Surprising (Score 1) 244

= = = But Tesla was the First company to sell an all battery powered Car.= = =

You don't read much of automotive history, do you? All-battery-powered cars have been on the market since 1890 and were looking to be the winning technology before the gasoline IC engine was really developed. Various major manufacturers have tried all-electric model from time to time from then through to today, Elon Musk or no.

Comment End of the cycle (Score 1) 305

Every technology goes through a cycle where the homebuilders and tinkerers are an important part of the ecosystem, and have a lot of fun doing so. Telegraph, electricity, radio, automobiles, airplanes all went through that cycle. Then the technology gets perfected, cleaned up, buttoned up, and ordinary human beings (non-tinkerers) just start using it for everyday. That leaves the hobbyists who come along at the end of the cycle and the greybeards who were there in the early days sad and unhappy, but that's the way it goes. Personal computers and mobile computing have now reached that point.

Comment Re:Florida as a backup? (Score 1) 128

= = = I agree that there should be a backup, but maybe one of the first considerations in having a backup site is selecting a location that is unlikely to be hit by hurricanes because your primary site could get hit by hurricanes. = = =
Particularly since there are several "well-used" hurricane tracks that can whack Canaveral, Huntsville, and Houston in one sweep.

Comment Re:Why not just move operations to another facilit (Score 1) 128

= = = There is a backup, the russion control centre near Moscow. However, given the construction of the building in Houston, its buttressing against flooding, and the overall situation, camping out in that building was likely the safest place for the controllers to be during the storm and its aftermath. = = =

Presumably their families and dependents agreed to the controllers accepting a job whose requirements include being locked into an impregnable bunker during catastrophic disasters while the family copes on its own. As a one-time employee of an old line electric company where the standard work shift was "until you are relived" [company record: 9 days] I understand the concept but in those days it was a more common family understanding than it is in the 'teens.

Comment Re:Wait what? (Score 1) 133

- - - - - You always have a choice. You document the request for the illegal thing, refuse to do it, and if you get fired, you sue for a juicy payout. - - - - -

"Can no one rid me of this meddlesome USEPA test requirement?"

Document away - it would take a very determined prosecutor to even get that through a US grand jury as an indictable statement. Also, the trend in the US is for individual whistleblowers to (a) be ignored by the investigative authorities (b) then criminally prosecuted for 'theft of employee property' after a few phone calls are made CEO-to-Attorney General.

Comment Re:That ain't hay (Score 2) 245

= = = We were also told that the Affordable Care Act would result in an average savings of $2500 per family per year, that the quality of healthcare would improve for everyone, and that if we had a plan and/or doctor that we liked we could keep that plan and/or doctor. It turns out that none of those things were actually true. = = =

Back in the day when I had Really Nice Corporate Medical Benefits I ran the risk of being forced to either change doctors every two years when corporate renegotiated the reinsurance deals with the major carriers. Or I could stay with the same doctor and pay huge percentages out of pocket when the carrier changed from BigCo to SuperBigCo - my choice. I have definitely had to change dentists multiple times for the same reason. Other than a few cherry-picked anecdotes pumped by Bannon/Breitbart I'm not aware of any reliable surveys that show large percentages of people had to change their doctor due to the provisions of the ACA. And since most USisns obtain their insurance through work there was no reason they should have - unless their employer used the ACA as cover to "restructure" (ie cut) their employee benefits.

  If you needed to take an ACA exchange plan and the (private business!) carrier changed that plan, than you might have had to change doctors, but as I noted that can happen when you are on IBM's best corporate plan as well.

Comment Re:Time to pile on Kalanick (Score 3, Insightful) 20

= = = Reminds me a little of Steve Jobs when it comes to business instincts. = = =

Steve Jobs may have stretched a few laws and regulations over the years (the 'agreement' on not cross-recruiting comes to mind), but none of Jobs' businesses were founded fundamentally on wholesale breaking and flouting of the law. So not such a great comparison there.

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