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Submission + - US Federal judge denies US government abilty to force use of fingerprints (chicagotribune.com)

raikoseagle writes: Today it was reported via the Chicago Tribune that a Chicago based US Federal magistrate, Judge David Weisman rejected the FBI's request to compel a defendant to unlock his iPhone via fingerprint.
Per the Tribune:
In the latest skirmish over privacy in the cellphone age, a federal judge in Chicago has rejected a law enforcement request to force potential targets in an ongoing investigation to provide fingerprints to unlock any iPhones or other Apple devices.

The order by U.S. Magistrate Judge David Weisman concerned a request for a warrant to search a residence where investigators believed someone was using the internet to traffic images of child pornography, court records show.

The prosecution filing seeking the search warrant on the FBI's behalf remains under seal, but the judge's opinion said the government requested "the authority to compel any individual who is present at the subject premises at the time of the search" to provide a fingerprint or thumbprint needed to unlock an Apple device.

Submission + - Radio Shack brand again in bankruptcy.

BarbaraHudson writes: Bloomberg is reporting that the "new" Radio Shack is preparing to file for bankruptcy.

General Wireless Operations, the RadioShack successor created by a partnership between Sprint Corp. and the defunct retailer’s owners, is preparing to file for bankruptcy, according to people familiar with the matter.

A filing could happen within the coming days and will probably result in liquidation, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the process isn’t public. The beleaguered company, which does business as RadioShack, operates outlets that share space with Sprint’s retail locations, as well as franchising the name to other stores.

Investors had thrown $75 million in lines of credit and term loans at the business, which was used for "renovated locations and updated inventory". That's less than $60,000 per store — chickenfeed in today's world, where renovating a McDonalds can run between $500,000 and $2,000,000, and you're not trying to pivot.

Submission + - The Dark Web Has Shrunk by 85% (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The number of Dark web services has gone down significantly following the Freedom Hosting II hack that took place at the start of February, and only consists of around 4,400 services, according to a recently published report.

Previous research published in April 2016 had the total number of Dark Web services at around 30,000. Comparing the two numbers, the report shows a decrease of over 85% in the overall size of Dark Web in the last year alone. Numbers show the Dark Web is laughably small, with around 4,000 HTTP websites, 250 TLS (HTTPS) endpoints, 100 SMTP services, and only 10 FTP nodes.

Submission + - Bill to terminate the Environmental Protection Agency proposed (congress.gov) 6

sandbagger writes: Rep. Gaetz, Matt (R-FL) has proposed a bill to shutter the Environmental Protection Agency. The GOP's complaints against the EPA are many including that it kills jobs, and has endorsed climate change, which, as a rule, the Republicans have dismissed as a hoax. Long term, the elimination of the EPA might also lead to a loss of American prestige as international benchmarks are ceded to other countries.

Submission + - IEEE-USA opposes efforts to expand the H-1B visa program (ieee.org)

Tekla Perry writes: IEEE USA says H-1B visas are a tool used to avoid paying U.S. wages. "For every visa used by Google to hire a talented non-American for $126,000, ten Americans are replaced by outsourcing companies paying their H-1B workers $65,000," says the current IEEE USA president, writing with the past president and president-elect. The outsourcing companies, Infosys, Cognizant, Wipro, and Tata Consultancy in 2014 "used 21,695 visas, or more than 25 percent of all private-sector H-1B visas used that year. Microsoft, Google, Facebook, and Uber, for comparison, used only 1,763 visas, or 2 percent," they say. They do support expanding green card programs, stating "America was built by green card holders, not guest workers."

Comment Re: Overboard, Sad! (Score 1) 358

More people are killed with BARE HANDS than are killed by someone using any kind of long gun.

Maybe so, but your hands can do lots of things, where as hand guns and assault weapons are designed specifically with only one purpose in mind.

By applying that same logic, those types of firearms are simply not needed since your hands are equally or more effective than guns

Comment Usually going out of business sales are discounted (Score 2) 198

  • 200 layoffs at Broomfield
  • $502 million in restructuring
  • Oregon exchange debacle
  • MongoDB grabbing lots of Oracle customers
  • They're now aggressively pursuing Java licensing fees
  • Questionable fate of their cloud offering
  • On-going legal battles with Google

... and the list goes on. Does anyone else see the writing on the wall for Oracle?

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