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Comment Re:Apple would reject 100% CPU app (Score 1) 331

I thought 100% CPU loops in a background application were exactly what the App Store review process was designed to prevent.

Unfortunately, first-party code doesn't go through that same process. I was thinking in particular about a recent experience with spotlight indexing when I made that snarky comment.

Comment Re:Real bad news (Score 1) 331

This. "I would buy an iPhone if it were only thinner," said no one ever.

What would make me upgrade my iPhone 6S to the iPhone 7 rather than skipping two generations and buying the iPhone 8? Give me the ability to carry my phone for a two week trip, using it the way I do now, without having to charge it.

By contrast, there's something bordering on pure insanity about the notion of taking away the headphone jack that many of us use very heavily in our cars while charging the device just so that Apple's engineers can brag about how much thinner they made a device that's already too thin to hold up to your ear without being constantly in fear of dropping it unless you put it in a case. Doubly so when you realize that it will likely mean relying more and more on software tricks to keep the battery life numbers up, while the worst-case battery life (with one of those hundred minor background daemons sitting in a tight loop using 100% of one CPU) continues to decline.

Comment Re: Airplane Mode (Score 1) 331

In the U.S., portable devices like cell phones can be used in airplane mode during takeoff and landing. Wireless headsets, however, are not allowed. So this would mean that if you plan to fly, you'll have to carry your wired headphones and an adapter. Just another reason that removing the headphone jack is an idiotic idea.

Comment Re:This is *SO* unethical ! (Score 1) 244

Clauses in legally binding agreements that grant one party the ability to unilaterally change the terms of those agreements are illegal in most places where the rule of law has any meaning. That's one of the reasons almost every contractual agreement, of which EULAs are one kind, have a clause that says if any of the terms are illegal they are void.

Comment Re:unpossible software hack? (Score 1, Insightful) 244

If you give them enough money, they'll do whatever you want. The question is only of the relative cost. Getting something custom done in open source is sometimes a matter of asking and waiting, or of paying a developer to do it for you. Getting something done in closed source might be a matter of filing a request under your support agreement, or it might mean a very expensive contract.

Comment Re:Oh, really? (Score 1) 220

Samsung has sold hundreds of millions of phones with OLED screens in.

Samsung manufactures OLED screens. They don't have to worry about a supplier not being able to meet demand, because they are the supplier. If they have to throw more money at it to bump up production, they will. If the yield is too low, they can make up for it by cranking up the price of OLEDs disproportionately for everyone else that they supply panels to, or by cutting off those other companies entirely.

A company buying panels from somebody else doesn't have that flexibility.

Comment Re: Easy solution (Score 1) 471

Eventually, those bearings fail, and you have to replace the motor, but not for a very long time.

I certainly hope not. You can typically press new bearings in for just about all other motors, after all.

You can put new bands in a transmission, too. Still, probably 99% of the time, you get a rebuilt transmission installed, and the installer ships back the old part to be remanufactured. I would expect that to be true for electric motor repairs as well.

You missed suspension, steering, body work/subframe rot, electical issues, HVAC issues, LED lights (yeah, they do go bad, apparently rather often from what I've seen on the road), tires, snow tires and wheels, parking brake adjustment, brake fluid, bearing replacement, differential work (though that could be eliminated), axle issues, interior problems (broken seats, for example), interior lights, batteries, and probably other stuff I've forgotten.

Brakes and steering on most electric vehicles are electrical, not hydraulic, which should result in very low maintenance, at least within the currently typical lifespan of a car.

Besides, most of the things on that list are repairs (after failures), not routine maintenance (to prevent future failures). There's nothing you can do maintenance-wise to prevent a blown interior bulb or a broken seat (except perhaps losing weight if you're on the heavy side).

The only thing on your list that I would consider true maintenance is tires, which was one of the things I mentioned.

Stellar rays prove fibbing never pays. Embezzlement is another matter.