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Comment Hearing Aids (Score 3) 311

Hearing loss severely affects people's social interactions, entertainment, etc. Insurance doesn't cover hearing aids. The ones that work best are expensive, $2500 and up, each. Social isolation is especially harmful to the older population, and so is hearing loss. I think this is an area that could be addressed by open hardware and software, perhaps better than some of the other items on this list. Kickstarter, anyone?
Data Storage

Samsung Unveils V-NAND High Performance SSDs, Fast NVMe Card At 5.5GB Per Second 61

MojoKid writes: Sometimes it's the enterprise sector that gets dibs on the coolest technology, and so it goes with a trio of TCO-optimized, high-performance solid state drives from Samsung that were just announced, all three of which are based on three-dimensional (3D) Vertical NAND (V-NAND) flash memory technology. The fastest of bunch can read data at up to 5,500 megabytes per second. That's the rated sequential read speed of Samsung's PM1725, a half-height, half-length (HHHL) PCIe card-type NVMe SSD. Other rated specs include a random read speed of up to 1,000,000 IOPS, random write performance of up to 120,000 IOPS, and sequential writes topping out at 1,800MB/s. The PM1725 comes in just two beastly storage capacities, 3.2TB and 6.4TB, the latter of which is rated to handle five drive writes per day (32TB) for five years. Samsung also introduced two other 3D V-NAND products, the PM1633 and PM953. The PM1633 is a 2.5-inch 12Gb/s SAS SSD that will be offered in 480GB, 960GB, 1.92TB, and 3.84TB capacities. As for the PM953, it's an update to the SM951 and is available in M.2 and 2.5-inch form factors at capacities up to 1.92TB.

Submission + - SPAM: The Health Problems Caused By Poor Oral Hygiene

An anonymous reader writes: In the last decade, the link between oral health and the condition of the body has been more thoroughly investigated than ever before. According to the American Dental Association, approximately 40% of people with serious gum disease also had a chronic health condition. This figure is far too high to be a coincidence and we look at why your mouth could be the gateway to the body.
Link to Original Source

Comment Re:Profiting from criminal acts (Score 3, Interesting) 159

You may not be allowed to profit from your own criminal behavior, but the 'criminal' is the person making the copy of the copyrighted material (once upon a time this was a tort, i.e. a wrong against someone that one could be sued for, not a crime against the state or general public; that's what these guys are always trying to do: turn torts into crimes so they can sic the government on you), not the specialized search engine or directory of links. The Usenet-indexers are profiting in the same way that Truman Capote profited when he wrote a book about a notorious murder.

Comment And if the people are relatives? (Score 4, Interesting) 215

I served on a jury in which DNA evidence was presented, along with the expert witness' estimation of probability that two random people would have the same number of matching points of comparison (DNA is only matched at a relatively small number of points in the strand).

In this case, however, there were many people present at the discovery of the object from which the DNA was taken for analysis. As it happens, several of these people were relatives (brother, mother) of the person the prosecution were trying to persuade us was the person that possessed (in legal terms) the object.

The question that I kept hoping the defense attorney would ask was "what are the probabilities of an erroneous match if the people are relatives, not just two random people off the street"? Unfortunately, he didn't.

As it happened, there were so many other peculiarities in this case as well as some pretty bizarre testimony from prosecution witnesses that we voted to acquit without making much of the DNA evidence.

Comment Re:Look at the DroboPro (Score 1) 609

I had a customer with a Drobo. They bought it as a backup device. In my experience it was quite terrible compared to stuffing a bunch of drives in a box and running FreeNas or something on it. The device itself is quite expensive, and we had lots of problems with it, and finally wound up relegating it to a 3rd tier backup role. Among the problems we had;
1. It takes a LONG time to rebuild. It took 3 days to rebuild after a drive failure, during which another drive failure would have caused complete data loss.
2. I/O performance was sub par. I don't remember the exact rates, but in our testing backups would take 3x as long to the Drobo as they would to a simple 1 tb USB drive.
3. We ran into issues with very large files (>50 gigabytes) which the filesystem it was formatted in supported without issue.
4. When we had a hardware failure in the device, which caused it to constantly fail a drive that independent testing showed was fine, and despite the customer purchasing the additional "Drobocare" extended warranty, between getting the run around from their support (who kept making the same suggestions over and over instead of escalating the case) it took over a month to get it replaced, and by the time it was done it would have been cheaper to throw it in the trash. I wouldn't want to rely on them for anything.

Overall it was a very negative experience. The only thing I could recommend them for would be for graphic artists or something that works solo and doesn't have the tech skills to set up a better solution.

Comment Re:Why, oh why? (Score 1) 143

Minor failures, sure, but I don't think I've ever heard of a shuttle performing an abort. In fact, I don't recall any successfully recovered in-flight catastrophe since Apollo 13. That said, that's probably because the crews do a good enough job that minor problems on the ground don't translate into major problems in flight.

Comment Re:Funny, that's exactly what the cops told me... (Score 0, Flamebait) 526

Are you fucking retarded?

So, yeah, the cops exactly argue they shouldn't investigate theft until all violent crime has been solved.

No, some cops might argue that. Lazy cops, incompetent cops. In this case, probably made-up strawman cops. But certainly not all cops. If that were true, then thefts would never be investigated. But we know that's just not true, because thefts are investigated daily.

But what are you trying to say, anyway? That cops should ignore all crime, because you've claimed that they've ignored some crimes related to you and your friends?

Every successful person has had failures but repeated failure is no guarantee of eventual success.

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