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We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

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Comment: Re:so... (Score 1) 271

by tobiasly (#49047577) Attached to: Peak Google: The Company's Time At the Top May Be Nearing Its End

In particular the birdseye angled aerial images are awesome and allow you to see all four sides of structure, instead just a roof, with surprisingly good resolution too.

I was surprised a few days ago to find out that Google Maps actually has this. You have to be on a PC and browser that support WebGL (i.e. no "Lite Mode" in the bottom-right corner). Zoom all the way in with satellite view turned on, then use the controls in the bottom-right to tilt the image. Then you can rotate in either direction, at which point it uses a cool 3D effect to stitch together its views of the different sides of buildings.

(I haven't actually used the Bing maps in quite a while, so not sure how this compares).

Comment: Re:Finally. A Google plan I can get behind (Score 3, Informative) 101

by tobiasly (#48872677) Attached to: Google Plans Major Play In Wireless Partnering With Sprint and T-Mobile

Backing underdogs like Sprint and T-Mobile makes me think Google may end up owning both.

That would be perfectly fine with me.. a combined Sprint + TMo may be the only way to break up the Verizon + AT&T duopoly.

However, there is one caveat: will Google be sniffing all the traffic it sees on these newly-acquired traffic just to harvest it and sell to advertisers.

I seriously doubt they'd do anything that stupid. I'm guessing it's probably even illegal. At the very least they'd have to spell it out in their privacy guidelines.

IANAL but the Google Fiber Privacy Policy seems to explicitly state they won't do this.

Comment: Re:Doesn't really matter if they do patch it (Score 5, Informative) 629

by tobiasly (#48794015) Attached to: Google Throws Microsoft Under Bus, Then Won't Patch Android Flaw

Furthermore we are up to version 5 of android and there is still no way to push security updates? That's a pretty serious fail IMO. Google might want to rethink that strategy before it seriously burns them in the long run.

They have rethought that strategy, and the solution is Google Play Services. All of the critical functionality has been moved there, which they can update via the Google Play store. Most of the individual apps have moved to independently-updatable Google Play apps as well. The WebKit based library discussed here has been replaced by a Chrome-based version, which also receives regular updates.

And yes, all devices Gingerbread (2.3) and above get these updates. The problem is that the WebView is one of the remaining pieces that was still tied directly to the OS in those earlier versions, so it can't be updated directly.

I'm not excusing Google for not fixing it here, but saying that version 5 still has no way to push security updates directly is incorrect.

Comment: Re:not that weird (Score 1) 159

by tobiasly (#48775709) Attached to: Inside North Korea's Naenara Browser

The article seemed a bit overexcited to me. Is it really that surprising that they use 10.x space? It's not like Internet access is widely used in NK. And most of the other items were not what I would call weird, just what you would expect in a regime like this. Still, kudos to the author for doing this analysis.

Heh I was wondering that too.. I wouldn't call it "going off the rails", it's exactly what any of us would do to "solve" the problem of limiting and monitoring the internet access of millions of users.

Comment: Re:I don't even... (Score 0) 323

by tobiasly (#48652691) Attached to: Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

TFA was TL;DR, and TFS doesn't explain anything. Apparently I'm not disciplined enough to even understand what the hell this is about.

Hell, TFS was TL;DR. Apparently they're discussing whether giving kids time-out is an effective disciplinary tool or something, but they prattled on about camping or whatever for so long I got bored & stopped reading.

Comment: Edited for Slashdot (Score 4, Interesting) 589

by tobiasly (#48621717) Attached to: Top Five Theaters Won't Show "The Interview" Sony Cancels Release

Not sure why they truncated my submission but the questions this raises was more interesting to me than the news itself.

For posterity: What should Sony do? Cut their losses and shelve it? Release it immediately online? Does giving in mean "the terrorists have won"?

+ - Top Five Theater Chains Won't Show "The Interview" After Sony Hack

Submitted by tobiasly
tobiasly (524456) writes ""The country's top five theater chains — Regal Entertainment, AMC Entertainment, Cinemark, Carmike Cinemas and Cineplex Entertainment — have decided not to play Sony's The Interview . This comes after the group which carried off a massive breach of its networks threatened to carry out "9/11-style attacks" on theaters that showed the film. What should Sony do? Cut their losses and shelve it? Release it immediately online? Does giving in mean "the terrorists have won"?"

Comment: Re:Very sad (Score 3, Insightful) 277

by tobiasly (#47974067) Attached to: Phablet Reviews: Before and After the iPhone 6

Wait, I thought hipsters were the guys who liked the new things? Like if you had an iPad and an iPhone you were a hipster, but if you had an old Android and a Lenovo laptop you were a legitimate human being.

It depends on whether a critical mass of the general population also likes said new thing. When they were the ones waiting in line all night at the Apple store, it was all good. Now that the same lines are filled with people sleeping in trash bags to immediately flip them to China's gray market, not so much.

+ - Ask Slashdot: Hosting services that doesn't over-react to DMCA requests?

Submitted by tobiasly
tobiasly (524456) writes "I run a few websites which are occasionally the target of bogus DMCA takedown requests. Even a cursory look at these requests would reveal that the content these requests try to have removed are not even eligible for copyright (for example, someone named "John Smith" decides he wants to have every instance of his name removed from the internet, so he claims he has a copyright on "John Smith", and the comment section of my website has that name somewhere.)

I'm guessing most webmasters of sites with significant traffic face this problem, but I'm having difficulty finding information on domain registrars' and hosting providers' DMCA response policies. Most seem to over-react and require an official counter-response. I'm worried I'll miss one of these someday and find that my entire domain was suspended as a result.

Both my domain registrar and hosting provider have forwarded these notices in the past. I'm also worried that they're forwarding my response (including personal details) to the original complainant. Which domain registrars and hosting providers have you found who handle these complaints in a reasonable manner, and filter out the ones that are obviously bogus? Which ones have a clearly stated policy regarding these requests, and respect the site owner's privacy? Some of these domains are .us TLD, which unfortunately will limit my choice to US-based companies."

+ - Mosquito-Repelling Newspaper Boosts Print Sales 30% in Sri Lanka

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A Sri Lankan newspaper may have just found a a way to sustain the struggling print business – and it’s helping to stop the spread of mosquito-borne diseases at the same time. Mawbina newspaper teamed up with Leo Burnett Sri Lanka to create mosquito-repelling newspapers for a public health campaign – and once those papers hit newsstands, sales increased by 30 percent."

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