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Comment Re:No. It won't be (Score 1) 101

I think the hold up is that ARM needs to be comparable in terms of computing power to Intel. Right now ARM's great as a low power platform (though Intel is seriously catching up) but Chromebooks are a very conspicuous case where ARMs are used in an environment they're almost never seen in.

I don't think the problem is the ABI. Apple has solved that three times before, 68K to PowerPC, and PowerPC to ix86 and ix86-64. The solutions weren't beautiful, but they worked. And the PowerPC to two different Intel APIs transition occurred with the current generation of operating system.

If ARM makes sense, they'll switch to it. I just don't see why they would - yet.

Comment Re:Why the lack of interest? (Score 2) 136

I'm not sure there's ever been that much interest. It's more of a theoretical standard, useful for people packaging binaries with hard coded paths, but even that isn't particularly useful right now. The LSB lost credibility from the Debian side from the start by picking the rival RPM as the packaging manager, and while I gather that different was papered over in time, the other fundamental issues - differing library versions, different standards for inclusion, etc - that prevent the concept of a "universal" package never got resolved.

It's probably a good thing it's going, a bad mostly ignored "standard" is probably worse than no standard at all, as it leads developers to make assumptions about what's available that they probably shouldn't.

Comment Re:Android's Achilles Heel (Score 2) 152

People have been filing bugs to the Android team over this issue since 2011 and it has never been addressed, and the newer bugs keep getting pushed to lower and lower priority.

I'm really starting to get pissed at this tendency. They let bugs that lots of people care about persist forever. For instance, there are actually two active bugs for pinless bluetooth pairing. This is a problem that actually predates gingerbread.

Comment Re:ZFS is nice... (Score 1) 268

IPMI 2.0 includes serial over LAN, but that's text only console redirection. If you want graphical console redirection, you need to use a proprietary tool from your vendor,

I... don't. Why would I? Both Linux and Windows (since 2003 with EMS) lets you do any system fixing & reconfiguration you could want, via serial console.

With OoBM, you really only need to get your system booting again, and network reconfigured and working. After that, you connect via in-band management, whether that's SSH, RDP, NX, VNC, etc. It's stupid, wrong, and terribly inefficient to use your OoBM for all your system management.

If you're running graphical Linux, you need graphical console redirection

Bullshit. You mean if you don't have a clue how to manage the basics on a Linux system without the GUI, THEN you're in trouble if you don't have graphical console redirection.

You get power on, off, cycle, read the (hardware) system event log, configure the network settings of the BMC, and console redirection to a serial port. For Dell, you also have to enable redirection via COM2 in the BIOS if you want serial over LAN.

As I said before, IPMI also enables you to change BIOS settings. You can "enable redirection via COM2 in the BIOS" directly & remotely via IPMI, without ever entering the BIOS. It's a simple one-liner. Then you

The "redirection" isn't even really needed, except for seeing BIOS messages on boot-up. Otherwise you just need to tell your OS to enable a console on serial, and you're fine.

Comment Re:I don't think it will mean much (Score 1) 202

"Meat stock, you're revving up a slippery slope. I'm overriding that shit."

Meat stock? That's only after you're in a severe crash, and all that's left of you is soup. Anyway, traction control is awesome. If you have some actual traction to work with, and your TC is four-wheel, then it is ridiculously great.

Comment Re:Don't contact aliens. Don't. (Score 1) 182

ALONG WITH most alien species are completely AFRAID of humans as they know our true potential. They want NOTHING to do with us until we grow the fuck up (spiritually.)

You must be assuming some galactic police force existing too, then, because if they're afraid of us and developed enough to be aware of us they can almost certainly send us a rock that we can't cope with.

Comment None of the above (Score 1) 57

The real problem with identity theft is that courts are granting judgements which absolutely should not be granted. Someone got a judgement against me for credit granted on the basis of a check cashing card with my social security number written on it, and not very well I might add.

Of course, another way to fix this problem (and all debt problems) would be to make all debt the responsibility of the lender. They can take risks, they can accept collateral, but the courts couldn't then be used to ruin people's lives in pursuit of profit. The guy who created this bogus debt in my name knew it was bogus, and his filing against my credit report was therefore fraudulent. But the court should have caught it, and they either don't care or want to enable this activity so that they can profit from the assorted fees and justification for their existence.

Comment Re:Why not just lock down the radio portion? (Score 1) 143

WiFi routers aren't like mobile phones with separate application processor and baseband. Instead, they only have one chip,

some phones have only one chip, and some wifi routers have multiple chips. I have examples here both of wifi routers with the wifi separate and with the wifi integrated.

Only the very cheapest routers can only be implemented with a SoC. Lots of the more expensive ones already aren't.

Comment Re:I guess they realised... (Score 4, Informative) 131

Well, it's funny how something with "the underpinnings of how X11 does it are actually decrepit and inefficient and compare poorly to other strategies that leverage different entry points that Wayland actually preserves" still manages to solve the problem, and Wayland doesn't.

X11 isn't perfect. Nobody's ever argued that. It's just nobody's really asking for a replacement, and if they were, they wouldn't be asking for Wayland. X11 is an extraordinary piece of technology, it takes some gal to claim everyone should just throw it out and replace it with a ground up rewrite that adds no new features and doesn't support the major features X11 is famous and loved for.

It's not like init/SystemD, where init really was a bug ridden piece of garbage that's needed replacing now since before Linux itself came on the scene, and SystemD implements everything init did but does it right.

Comment Not too hard (Score 1) 182

1. Detection
Pulses of prime numbers. Not natural phenomenon, same in all number systems. Simple beat with silence:

01111111111 111111111

2. Binary, you speak it
We repeat this in binary, which should be fairly easy to recognize as the previous information aligned to 8 bit = byte values.
00000010 00000011 00000101 00000111
00001011 00001101 00010001 00010011

3. Length of payload in bytes + payload
00000000 00000000 00000001 10110000 = 432
432 x ????????

4. Goto 1, rotate payload.

As for the actual payload.... You could for example send atom configuration from the periodic table.
1 - 1
2 - 2
3 - 2,1
10 - 2,8
11 - 2,8,1
18 - 2,8,8
19 - 2,8,8,1
20 - 2,8,8,2
21 - 2,8,9,2
22 - 2,8,10,2
23 - 2,8,11,2
24 - 2,8,13,1

It will be pretty obvious to any physicist this is the list of elements. Using that and a bit more you can explain the units of mass, time, distance and so on.

For math you can send a list of (input A, operator code, input B, result) and it will be obvious that this operator means addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and so on. Once you have subtraction, explain 0-1 and two's complement and you'll have negative numbers.

Then you can start making advanced concepts like C+O+O = CO2 and describe properties of that gas. I really don't think it's going to become a problem bootstrapping communication, if we could just find someone to communicate with.

Comment Re:Show us the data (Score 1) 415

The FAA and other regulatory bodies have to have a notional value of a human life to be able to balance the cost to society of new safety rules against the benefit to society in terms of lives saved.

Yes, but note their interpretations differ, and are either based on some notion of cost, or just made-up bullshit to justify their other actions. The insurance companies are actually paying out money, which is why I suggest looking there. I think they're probably a better reference for the value of health than of life, admittedly.

People are always available for work in the past tense.