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Yahoo!

+ - Yahoo accused of misleading Congress

Submitted by taoman1
taoman1 (1050536) writes "Yahoo misled Congress regarding information the Internet company gave to Chinese authorities about the journalist Shi Tao, according to Democratic Rep. Tom Lantos. "Our committee has established that Yahoo provided false information to Congress in early 2006," Lantos said in a written statement. "We want to clarify how that happened, and to hold the company to account for its actions...""
Microsoft

+ - Microsoft and Bungie Studios split apart

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Bungie Studios, the Microsoft subsidiary that produces the mega-selling "Halo" video game series, is going independent. Microsoft is going to keep a firm grip on the Halo series, though, and make sure it continues to only be made for Microsoft game consoles."
Music

+ - RIAA loses counterclaim lawsuit->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "This is the case in which the Court had sustained 5 of the 6 counterclaims interposed by Ms. Del Cid.

The court sustained defendant's counterclaims for

-trespass to defendant's personal property based on the RIAA's having accessed files on Ms. Del Cid's computer without her permission,
-violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act based on the RIAA's unauthorized intrusion into defendant's computer,
-violation of Florida's Deceptive and Unfair Trade Practices Act,
-a declaratory judgment of non-infringement, and
-conspiracy to commit extortion, since defendant sufficiently alleged "a peculiar power of coercion possessed by Plaintiffs [by] virtue of their combination, which an individual alone would not possess"."

Link to Original Source
The Courts

+ - Jury awards $220,000 to RIAA in P2P case-> 1

Submitted by Conrad
Conrad (666) writes "The Capitol Records v. Jammie Thomas verdict is in, with a jury finding her liable of willful copyright infringement for all 24 songs. At $9,250 per song, the grand total is $222,000. The RIAA is pleased with the verdict: 'The plaintiffs' legal team spent a few minutes talking to the jury after the verdict was announced, finally emerging from the courthouse to take questions from the media. The first question asked of Gabriel was whether the RIAA would enforce and try to collect the judgment. Gabriel replied that he hadn't had the chance to talk to the client about that yet. He said that the jury did not explain how they arrived at the $9,250 figure, but that they expressed to the legal team that the case was "clear and well-presented." Gabriel also noted the magnitude of the case in response to a question. "We appreciate the opportunity to put out in daylight the facts and evidence collected in this case," he replied. "This does send a message, we hope, that both downloading and distributing music is no joke." When asked if there was an end game in sight for the series of lawsuits, Gabriel said that it was up to the RIAA to decide.'"
Link to Original Source
Moon

The New Moon Race 212

Posted by Zonk
from the make-the-jump dept.
An anonymous reader writes "News.com has a pictoral and editorial look at the quickly-heating second race to the moon. A Japanese orbital probe is expected to reach orbit of the satellite sometime today, just one of the dozens of projects now aiming to exploit Earth's orbital partner for scientific and business gains. 'The next lunar visitor may come from China. The Chang'e-1 spacecraft is scheduled to lift off near the end of October. It is slated to study the moon's topography in 3D and also investigate its elements. Chang'e-3 is a soft lunar lander that is scheduled to fly in 2010 ... If all goes as planned, the United States and India will have astronauts on the moon by 2020, China by 2022, and Japan and Russia by 2025.'"
The Internet

+ - The Ban on Internet Service Taxes May Soon Expire->

Submitted by
nelsonjs
nelsonjs writes "On November 1st, the ban on taxing Internet service is set to expire. The ban was originally implemented in 1998, in order to encourage the proliferation of Internet access. If a compromise is not reached by November 1st, prices for Internet service nationwide could jump — as high as 17 percent, according to ISPs. There are currently two competing alternatives being considered in the Senate..."
Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Unisys Probed for DHS Cyber Incident Cover-Up

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Unisys Corp., a company with a $1.7 billion Department of Homeland Security contract after is under investigation for failing to detect cyber break-ins traced to a Chinese-language Web site and then trying to cover up its deficiencies, The Washington Post reports. From the story: Through October of that year, Thompson said, 150 DHS computers — including one in the Office of Procurement Operations, which handles contract data — were compromised by hackers, who sent an unknown quantity of information to a Chinese-language Web site that appeared to host hacking tools. The contractor also allegedly falsely certified that the network had been protected to cover up its lax oversight, according to the committee."
Security

+ - Unisys investigated for covering up cyberattacks

Submitted by Stony Stevenson
Stony Stevenson (954022) writes "Unisys, a major government IT contractor, reportedly is being investigated for allegedly failing to detect cyberattacks, and then covering up its failings. Two US congressmen have called for an investigation into cyberattacks aimed at the Department of Homeland Security, along with a contractor charged with securing those networks.

In the letter they say the House Committee on Homeland Security's investigations led them to believe the department is under attack by foreign powers, and could be at risk because of "incompetent and possibly illegal activity" by a U.S. contractor. The congressmen didn't name the contractor in the letter. However, the Washington Post on Monday reported that the FBI is investigating Unisys, a major information technology firm with a US$1.7 billion Department of Homeland Security contract, for allegedly failing to detect cyber break-ins traced to a Chinese-language Web site and then trying to cover up its deficiencies."

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