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Journal: Mars, Ho! Chapter Forty Six

Journal by mcgrew

Awake
I woke up about quarter after seven, and Destiny was already up and had coffee started. "Hungry?" She asked.
"Yeah, I am. Did we even eat dinner last night? Did you tell the robots to start breakfast?"
"No, I wanted to try something new for breakfast and wanted to see what you wanted to eat first. You know I'm a history buff, well, I found a really old recipe in the computer called a

Comment: Re:Comfortable, were we? (Score 1) 110

by Mr. Slippery (#47787177) Attached to: Japanese Publishers Lash Out At Amazon's Policies

Bwahaha you slackjawed imbecile, you realise you've just described the actual outcomes of everything marxist?

Bwa-ha-ha you slack-jawed imbecile, you realize there are more possible ways to structure an economy than capitalist so-called "free markets", and Marxism-degraded-into-Stalinism-or-Maoism, right?

On maybe, like most Americans brought up on a century of Red Scares, you don't.

Comment: Re:Gender imbalance is self selected (Score 1) 548

by Mr. Slippery (#47784249) Attached to: Why Women Have No Time For Wikipedia

The argument is that a concerted push to end sexism *just for women* is itself sexist.

Yes, it is. But for any given instance of sexism against women, some making a push to end it will be motivated only to end sexism against women, and some will be motivated to end all sexism. Thus one cannot determine merely from participation in, or advocacy for, a specific attempt to end an instance of misogynist sexism, whether one is merely misandrist or is truly in favor of equality.

Comment: Re:Gender imbalance is self selected (Score 1) 548

by Mr. Slippery (#47784195) Attached to: Why Women Have No Time For Wikipedia

How many women fly fish? Not many. Guess how much sexism there is keeping women from fly fishing? Zero.

You post about how it's important to provide evidence for a hypothesis, then spit out a hypothesis about sexism with zero evidence for it. That's so remarkably thick-headed I have to think that maybe you're engaged in some sort of meta-troll? If not, then let me point out that a minute with the search engine of your choice can help prevent you saying stupid things:

Angling and Sexism

SEXISM in FISHING ADVERTISING, SHOWS & MAGAZINES

Wanton Sexism in Fly Fishing (What is Going On?)

Bait Shop Sexism

Comment: Re:Loose Lips Sinik Ships (Score 5, Insightful) 242

Unfortunately, while not false (in the most obvious case, informants have a way of winding up dead if you are too obvious about their existence); your justification leaves two major issues unaddressed:

1. The government is not refusing to divulge the specific reasons and evidence that led to a particular person being added to the list(which quite plausibly might reveal specific informants, bugged computers, etc. and would likely merit an in camera review or something). They are refusing to divulge the general criteria and possible methods by which anyone could end up on the list. It's the difference between "Tell me exactly who ratted out Big Vinnie" and "What constitutes 'Racketeering' for the purposes of the US criminal code". One is a potential operational risk. The other is 'rule of law'.

2. The 'no fly list' is a bullshit twilight category without obvious protective value. Apparently there are people (and lots of them) so dangerous that they cannot be allowed on a passenger aircraft, even with some sort of enhanced screening; but so safe that apparently no other measures need be taken. It's a combination of state harassment(not being able to fly is a pretty big deal if you travel much) and absurd magical thinking. Too dangerous to fly; but safe enough to do basically anything else? Seriously? Why would that category even exist? Hijacking an airplane with a pointy object shouldn't work anymore(if we finished upgrading the doors), and anyone who can get bombs, firearms, or toxins doesn't need a plane to cause trouble.

The refusal to even outline how you fall into such a category, or why such a category exists, is a profound mockery of the notion of rule of law. No, not every specific detail of how every piece of evidence is gathered can be safely revealed; but that isn't the story here.

Comment: Re:why the focus on gender balance? (Score 1) 548

by Mr. Slippery (#47784041) Attached to: Why Women Have No Time For Wikipedia

Why not let women do what they want instead of trying to force them in to places that aren't necessarily their thing?

I see no "force" here. I see no objectification here. You are using hotbutton keywords that have no relevance.

If a certain group of people don't feel invited to your thing, it's entirely appropriate to re-write your invitation. If your infrastructure isn't supportive of a certain demographic, it's entirely appropriate to remediate that.

OTOH, if (at TFA suggests) you've got a demographic that's socialized to avoid conflict, and you've got a project that inherently involves conflict between different POV, you've got a problem.

Comment: Interesting. (Score 4, Interesting) 126

One doesn't have to see the value in stuff that isn't immediately applicable R&D(and I'm not here to debate the point, do as you will); but if you are OK with the concept of such research this actually seems like a pretty good idea:

The question of how and why ideas, 'culture', religions, new scientific hypotheses, etc. are transmitted and compete with one another is really a very long standing one. A lot of the historical study emphasizes 'elite' culture and theory(mostly because everything else was oral record only, and that doesn't keep well; but written works sometimes survive) or religious(high frequency of literacy, and proselytizing is a technology of considerable interest to contemporary religions); but there is also study of popular culture, folk mythologies, what the middle and lower classes were reading and watching(once that became common), and so on.

Cultural transmission is a very solid social science topic, and internet memes have the dual virtues of both potentially being novel(they might actually follow some traditional propagation pattern, might be something new, either way would be interesting to know) and being amenable to large-scale analysis because the internet is just so conveniently searchable and heavily cached in various places. You don't have to like the entire field; but this research project seems like a perfectly reasonable exercise.

Comment: Re:interesting case.... (Score 1) 75

by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (#47772783) Attached to: Fake NVIDIA Graphics Cards Show Up In Germany
You wouldn't even need to be having production issues. As with most vendors, Nvidia has a bunch of options for sale and the nicer ones cost more. Even if you have the capability to stuff boards with the nicer chips just as easily as the cheap ones, a bit of fraud will do wonders for your BoM costs.

Comment: Re:interesting case.... (Score 3, Informative) 75

by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (#47772773) Attached to: Fake NVIDIA Graphics Cards Show Up In Germany
It would be interesting for an intermediary to be involved since producing/obtaining correctly faked GPUs is a comparatively specialized task. Not rocket science, pick the cheapest Nvidia silicon that is close enough to not react horribly to drivers expecting the real thing, tamper with the identifying portions of the firmware, replace any packaging, stickers, or other labels; but it's hardly the old 'purchase thing from best buy, return brick in the box' scam.

This doesn't mean that it isn't one of the intermediaries; but if it is they are working with considerably more sophistication than the 'fell off the truck' level of supply chain skimming.

Comment: Re:Honestly, when will people learn? (Score 1) 98

by Wrath0fb0b (#47765693) Attached to: Project Zero Exploits 'Unexploitable' Glibc Bug

An acquaintance recently posted "Six Stages of Debugging" on his g+ page. (1. That can't happen, 2. That doesn't happen on my machine, 3. That shouldn't happen, 4. Why does that happen? 5. Oh, I see, and 6. How did that ever work). Doesn't an software dev who has been working for more than about three years go straight to No. 4?

Absolutely true for debugging. But there's a few steps you missed.

Somewhere near 3-4: Ok, how bad would it be if that happened? Does it recover without user intervention (i.e. service crashes and cron restarts it)? Does it recover with user intervention ("did you turn it off and back on?)? Does it lose user data (oh poop)?

The question here (which is altogether not trivial) is exactly this: "how bad would it be if we wrote an extra '\0' somewhere"? And what geohot did was answer that in the most productive way possible - by actually showing with a real example that the impact is major and permanent. If you aren't explicitly doing assessment of the impact of your bugs for schedule/priorities then you must be doing it implicitly somehow because most projects have more bugs than coders/time.

There's another step you missed, happens probably at step 10 or 11 and probably not by the developer that fixes the bug -- given the impact and the risk of the fix, when/how should this be deployed? Should it be backported to the stable releases? Do we have to ping everyone downstream? Is this so bad we should post on /. telling everyone to pull the emergency fix ASAP or else zombie Putin will kill Natalie Portman?

Again, if you aren't doing this step explicitly, it's either happening implicitly or else you are just letting it land whenever/however.

In these matters the only certainty is that there is nothing certain. -- Pliny the Elder

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