Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:The Level of Abstraction (Score 1) 158

by smellotron (#49157005) Attached to: Invented-Here Syndrome

I realized that Apache was part of the Controller

I am happy for your enlightenment! It amazes me how many people don't get this, and want to write a PHP "Front Controller" that uses a querystring parameter to select the "page", and then slap a mod_rewrite rule on top to clean up the URL. Instead of—as it sounds like you discovered—putting each page in its own file in the filesystem and letting Apache "route" the request.

Comment: Re:UX (Score 1) 323

On a 3g connection in a grocery store on a hand-held, you're not going to get great response.

...but your proposed alternative is 20 request-response pairs? OK sure, at some point a full page load can be too heavyweight compared to JSON async payloads. But why not just do one async load on a batch submit, get better performance, and still support graceful degradation?

...some anachronistic submit button...

People still batch-process things, in life. It's not an anachronism.

No way hose A.

"José", not "hose A". Er... it looks like slashcode is going to mutilate that, it should look like "Jose" with an acute accent over the 'e'.

Comment: Re:UX (Score 1) 323

When I select 20 items to be removed, I don't have to wait for 20 page reloads on a slow connection.

In the old days, you would select 20 checkboxes, and then submit a form for batch removal. That was 1 full-page reload, rather than 20 concurrent "fragment" (probably JSON response, I dunno) reloads. Nobody worth copying was forcing 20 serial page reloads for such an activity.

...and the entire job is done in about a second

"About a second" is certainly not enough time for a user to select twenty items, so I'm going to assume that you mean that "about a second" means time from the first async submit to the last async response. That is TERRIBLE latency.

Comment: Re:After the other subsidies. (Score 1) 168

... prevent Iraq setting up a Euro-ba[s]ed petroleum exchange, ... the price of the dollar is pinned to the price of oil by the fact that almost all oil sales of any note are done in dollars.

The "lead" crude oil contract is a US-based product, but the European runner-up is still traded in USD and not EUR. If Iraq tried to force trading in a different currency by setting up their own exchange, they would still have to draw enough trading interest to unseat the other two contracts.

Comment: Re:They're a resource, not a "problem". (Score 1) 307

The most important part of college wasn't what you learned - it was probably nearly obsolete when they were teaching it to you - but learning how to learn.

The fundamental material in a computer science program is math. That is the type of subject which does not go out of style but is instead built upon, layer by layer.

Comment: Re:Obvious to Engineers (Score 1) 185

I will buy the distance argument if Venus's current temperature is believed to be independent of its current cloud cover, but I don't believe that is the case (Venus is by far the hottest planet in the Solar System). It sounds like Venus is hotter given its cloud cover than would be expected without, which implies that Earth will also get hotter in similar conditions. Maybe not 300C hotter, but even 10C hotter is world-changing.

Comment: Re:Obvious to Engineers (Score 1) 185

You will also get more water vapor ( another greenhouse gas ) in the atmosphere, but that will - eventually - be countered somewhat by the albedo effect of the large scale clouds that will form.

I understand the reflective effect of cloud coverage, but isn't that useless if the steady-state temperature is very different from current temperatures? What prevents extreme greenhouse effects from pushing Earth into a Venus-like state?

Comment: Re:Debian GNOME needs some attention (Score 1) 403

by smellotron (#47980697) Attached to: Debian Switching Back To GNOME As the Default Desktop

I am a frequent traveler and speaker and really do need something you can drop from 6 feet and pour coffee over have it keep working.

I know you're a normal person, but when I read that I imagined a huge fucking guy fumbling his tablet from shoulder-height, getting mad as hell, and throwing his coffee after the poor thing.

Comment: Re:A solution in search of a problem... (Score 1) 326

by smellotron (#47908241) Attached to: Technological Solution For Texting While Driving Struggles For Traction

My point was sarcastic, I don't know if you missed it (non-native language?) or if you responded in-kind. Plainly, prohibition and licensing are not the same thing. An unlicensed "operator" is prohibited yes, but the cost of licensing is always goint to be lower than the cost of a black-market solution (by its nature; the black market solution is not attractive if it is worse, because of the inherent risk!) Therefore, the net result is more regulatory control when licensing is an option vs. total prohibition.

Ultimately, my point is that (1) comparing licensed driving to the War on Drugs is not valid, because (2) increased license requirements would serve to change the economics of learning how to drive rather than just imposing randomized penalties.

Comment: Re:Steam to extract oil that shouldn't be... (Score 1) 82

by smellotron (#47905675) Attached to: Solar Powered Technology Enhances Oil Recovery

This is a good example of greenwashing.

This doesn't sound anything like greenwashing; greenwashing is a PR move to appear more "eco-friendly". This is simpler to explain as a rational economic decision: There are forms of non-renewable energy that are not harvested only because the energy cost to extract them exceeds the energy value they provide. If the energy costs to extract them can be brought down to near-zero, it is to Shell's economic benefit to extract and sell the heavy crude.

Your argument that the oil should "stay in the ground" is totally unrelated. I do not have an informed opinion in the matter of heavy crudes, but please don't use it as a rebuttal.

Comment: Re:Powershell (Score 1) 729

I see that it is in C99. But it wasn't when I was learning C in the 1980s.

Well! I'll get off your lawn now. I learned on C99, I did not know that the guarantee was new.

Don't use a language that encourages pointer calculations. If you're working in the kernel or hardware drivers maybe.

That is hardly an argument against sizeof as a language feature. I think we both agree—outside of the first learning experience—developers who are getting tripped up by sizeof should't be using C in the first place; but it is not the fault of the language or a misfeature.

FORTUNE'S FUN FACTS TO KNOW AND TELL: A firefly is not a fly, but a beetle.

Working...