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Submission + - Apple's iCloud runs on Microsoft Azure (

ge7 writes: Apple's recently announced cloud storage and cloud service platform iCloud runs on their main competitor Microsoft's Azure platform and Amazon services. "Apple has selected Microsoft's Azure and Amazon's AWS to jointly host its iCloud service. According to The Reg's sources, Microsoft insiders see the iCloud deal as a validation of Azure. iCloud puts Azure into a different league, given the brand love for Apple and the Apple management's fanatical attitude to perfection. It is a 'huge consumer brand, a great opportunity to get Azure under a very visible workload'. Apple has had a recent unpleasant experience in providing online services: in a famous memo, Steve Jobs admitted his company had 'more to learn about internet services' following the outages and failures of his precursor to iCloud for email, contacts, calendar, photos and other files on MobileMe.

Submission + - Canada Encouraged US To Place It on Piracy List ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: Copyright, U.S. lobbying, and the stunning backroom Canadian response gets front page news treatment today in Canada as the Toronto Star covers new revelations on copyright by Michael Geist (who offers a longer post with links to the cables) from the U.S. cables released by Wikileaks. The cables reveal that former Industry Minister Maxime Bernier raised the possibility of leaking the copyright bill to U.S. officials before it was to be tabled it in the House of Commons, former Industry Minister Tony Clement’s director of policy Zoe Addington encouraged the U.S. to pressure Canada by elevating it on a piracy watch list, Privy Council Office official Ailish Johnson disclosed the content of ministerial mandate letters, and former RCMP national coordinator for intellectual property crime Andris Zarins advised the U.S. that the government was working on a separate intellectual property enforcement bill.

Submission + - Lenovo claims Samsung Galaxy Tab sold just 20,000 (

An anonymous reader writes: The Guardian writes that Andrew Barrow, director of consumer products for Lenovo Western Europe, claims that the original Galaxy Tab only sold 20,000 out of one million shipped. He goes on to say Samsung was "channel stuffing" in order to generate publicity and become known as a major Android tablet manufacturer.
The Internet

Submission + - Dutch government revokes Diginotar certificates (

An anonymous reader writes: (original Dutch text:

After previously claiming that the Iranian hack of CA Diginotar did not compromise certificates of the Dutch government, it has now been decided that there is too much risk and the certificates will have to be revoked after all. Since the Dutch government has been using only Diginotar-supplied certificates this will leave all government websites with invalid certificates while a new supplier is being searched for. The minister of internal affairs recommends people not to use the websites if a warning about an invalid certificate appears.


Submission + - Intel and AMD May Both Delay Next-Generation CPUs (

MojoKid writes: "AMD and Intel are both preparing to launch new CPU architectures between now and the end of the year, but rumors have surfaced that suggest the two companies may delay their product introductions, albeit for different reasons. Various unnamed PC manufactures have apparently reported that Intel may push back the introduction of its Ivy Bridge processor from the end of 2011 to late Q1/early Q2 2012. Meanwhile on the other side of the CPU pasture, there are rumors that AMD's Bulldozer might slip once again. Apparently AMD hasn't officially confirmed that it shipped its upcoming server-class Bulldozer products for revenue during August. This is possible, but seems somewhat unlikely. The CPU's anticipated launch date is close enough that the company should already know if it can launch the product."

Submission + - Fascinating 1972 film uses 3D graphics (

AlejoHausner writes: "In 1972, Ed Catmull, then at the University of Utah, put together a film showcasing many of the 3D computer graphics techniques he and others had developed while working as students in Ivan Sutherland's lab. That film has been digitized and is available on . All kinds of modern techniques like gouraud shading, deformed meshes, and z-buffering are shown in the film. There is a segment showing Catmull digitizing a plaster model of his hand. Catmull later founded Pixar, but at the time the Utah lab pioneered many of the graphics techniques we take for granted today."

Submission + - Heise's "Two Clicks For More Privacy" vs. Facebook (

FlameWise writes: Yesterday, German technology news site Heise changed their social Like-Buttons to a two-click format. This will effectively disable unintentional automatic tracking of all page visits by third-party social sites like Facebook, Twitter or Google+. Less than 24 hours later over 500 websites have asked about the technology. Facebook is now threatening to blacklist Heise.

German source:

A fanatic is a person who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill