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Comment: Re:Great Recession part II? (Score 1) 637

That is a relief.

Thanks for the info. ... but your closing statement? You and I both know they won't. They elected an official who promised not to pay with thundering applause from the idiot citizens who voted him in. Wow.

As usual if you are I do not pay off our student loans the banks cash our paybacks and FORCE US to payback where not even bankruptacy starving ourselves and our kids. When nations do it and take down the economy of innocent parties then it is business as usual. No consequences etc.

I am not a socialist by any sense of the means about income inequality but man it does boil my blood as the bigger parties like whole banks, industries, and countries get off the hook but we are supposed to be responsible yada yada

Comment: Re:I'll believe it when I see it... (Score 1) 116

by Rei (#49767671) Attached to: India Ends Russian Space Partnership and Will Land On the Moon Alone

Its not that simple. You can't just recover it from nuclear reactor waste because it's mixed in with other isotopes of plutonium, and isn't in that great of quantities to begin with. So first off you have to reprocess nuclear waste to extract the neptunium - which again, itself isn't in very great quantities, it takes a lot of waste, and most places don't want to do waste reprocessing to begin with due to cost and liability issues. You then have to make neptunium targets and expose them to a neutron flux - that is, using neutronicity that could otherwise be used for power generation or other valuable purposes (it takes a lot of neutrons to make a tiny bit of Pu238). Pu238 should be more thought of as a manufactured product than as a byproduct of particular types of nuclear reactors.

There are a few other candidates for use as space power sources that actually are waste products, but they're all significantly worse performers. There are two other alternatives. One is to make a Sterling RTG, which was in development, but funding has been cut off (it's also kind of tricky because you have to ensure that something with moving parts will operate for decades in the harsh environment of space). The other is to make an actual nuclear reactor. This means almost limitless power, but it comes at the expense of not only massive development costs and public opposition, but a large minimum size and massive radiator requirements, as well as the same reliability challenges of sterling generators.

There's no easy solutions. Except, of course, to stop bloody wasting plutonium once we have it.

Comment: Re:Great Recession part II? (Score 1) 637

But that line could change.

Psychology played in the Great Recession which magnified it after the math failed. No one trusted each other and banks borrowed from each other with credit asset swapping. (Why weren't they labeled expenses??)

So viola they all told each other you are no good. BOOM! Collapse and Uncle Sam had to come in and payback and buy the junk assets to try to have them trust each other again.

If Greece goes Italy will be viewed next (bad side). If they go fear will spread and those like Portugal WILL get shafted as investors know no one else will pay for their bonds so if you buy your money will be out the window etc. The bonds are worth as much as toilet paper as no one will buy them due to fear.

Yes this sounds nonsensical but in the great recession, 1929, and other events in history it has happened. I doubt banks hold less greek bonds unless the IMF bought them all? Why? Let's say you own them? Who in their right mind would buy them?! No one. You are stuck holding them or selling them at a HUGE loss.

Comment: Re:Great Recession part II? (Score 0) 637

Let's say you and I and a friend need some money.

We borrow from each other and swap the debt around and as long as the chain is good and we *trust* each other and pay back things run smoothly. Let's say I owe less but say I can't pay you 2 back. Then comes fear with you and the other guy saying to each other you are no good.

This sounds silly and nonsensical but happened in the USA in 2008. Psychology as no one trusted each other and said they were no good the assets instantly turned into expenses that no one could afford.

Yes, Greece is tiny. But what is to say spooked investors who lost tons of cash now look at Ireland and Italy next. Everyone does it and now Italy is no good because the other investors said so. It can't borrow to pay its bills, etc. Spain, then eventually the US.

Swapping debt assets seem stupid like the children's hot potato game where as long as you are not holding the potato when the bill is due you gain.

Comment: Great Recession part II? (Score 2, Insightful) 637

I am nervous as this feels like early 2008 all over again.

People though ack a few banks will be late paying each other for it's silly home instruments. Big deal let's buy banking shares now while they are cheap etc ...

We all know what happened next? Last year we finally came close to full recovery. The house of cards collapsed and is still being pumped up by the federal Reserve as we never had a full collapse!

Japan, America, and the EU may be next should Greece not to pay with skyrocketing rates and a great depression awaiting as the Federal Reserve won't be able to pump borrowed money to the banks, again.

Am I the only one who sees this?

Comment: Re:I'll believe it when I see it... (Score 4, Interesting) 116

by Rei (#49764673) Attached to: India Ends Russian Space Partnership and Will Land On the Moon Alone

"Love" is the nice way to put it. "Largess at the expense of all other solar system exploration" would be more accurate. Here's a graph. And it's always the same stupid justifications - how many times can we pretend to be excited about "revelations" that Mars was once in its past a wet place? Or that we're going to stumble into life any time soon in its perchlorate-rich, destroys-organics-on-contact regolith?

And it's not just huge amounts of money that they're wasting - they're also throwing away most of the remainder of our plutonium supply. At least there's money to start making it again, but it'll take time. Plutonium is precious, and it's needed for outer planet missions.

Comment: Re:Twenty five years of science destruction... (Score 2, Insightful) 116

by Rei (#49764639) Attached to: India Ends Russian Space Partnership and Will Land On the Moon Alone

I hate to be the one to tell you but academia generally pays poorly outside of the US. More so in a country like Russia that is still clawing its way back up from the economic collapse that occurred during the transition from communism to capitalism.

Perhaps if most of the country's wealth wasn't concentrated in the hands of a handful of corrupt oligarchs who live like a modern version of Roman emperors they'd be able to pay researchers a living wage.

Comment: Re:Ducted fans? (Score 1) 74

by Rei (#49763377) Attached to: The Hoverboard Flies Closer To Reality

You don't need "antigravity" (which in all likelihood is impossible). Diamagnetic hoverboards would be possible... if we could make ridiculously powerful, compact halbach arrays in the board. Also you'd need a clever mechanism to detect and deal with flying over ferromagnetic material, or otherwise it's going to smack into your board really hard.

Comment: Re: My personal favorite was (Score 1) 382

by Billly Gates (#49759449) Attached to: 25 Years Today - Windows 3.0

Macs had cooperative multitasking since 1984. Windows 3.0 also had cooperative multitasking. It didn't need dos emulation and weird graphics hacks as it was built from the ground up rather than an add on hack for Windows. Mac II was color in 1987.

My point is Windows was a low grade hack until Windows 95 where it became a pseudo OS with more hacks upon hacks to get anything to work until XP came along and kicked the nasty model to the curb for all pcs

Comment: Re:Yet looks more modern than 8/10 (Score 3, Interesting) 382

by Billly Gates (#49759217) Attached to: 25 Years Today - Windows 3.0

You know just because you all hated the leather background in the Mac address book does not mean you need to get rid of shininess, chrome, depth perception, and other features which actually helped the user distinguish which Window was active.

ENOUGH IS ENOUGH! Give me my damn skuemorphism back. It works fine. I know NO ONE and I mean NO ONE besides hipster graphic designers afraid to have anything modern looking on their portfolio as other hipster artist look at them before hiring them. It creates a cycle of race to the bottom of less graphics, less detail, blinding white, 72x text.

SKUEMORPHISM != REALISM folks and MS appearently thinks it does.

Comment: Re: Meh... (Score 4, Insightful) 244

by Rei (#49757847) Attached to: California Votes To Ban Microbeads

The problem is, sewage treatment systems have a lot of trouble (at present, let's just simply say "can't") filtering them out. They go into the sewage, they will go into the sea.

Setting up filters for particles as small as 1 micron for all sewage going out into the ocean is obviously going to be a massive expensive. Who wants to pay for that so that people can keep sticking bits of plastic in cosmetics?

Seriously, whose bright idea was it to make bits of plastic, bite-size for plankton, looking like fish eggs, whose very design intent is to wash out into the ocean? And no, while they're not harmful to us, they absolutely will be to plankton - if not immediately (how healthy do you think you'd be if you wolfed down an entire meal-sized chunk of plastic?), then with time. Plastics act as chelators for heavy metals and a number of organic poisons, to such a degree that they might even be economical to mine. There's simply no way that this isn't going to have an impact.

And it's so stupid when one can just use soluble crystals (salts, sugars, etc) instead of plastic.

"You show me an American who can keep his mouth shut and I'll eat him." -- Newspaperman from Frank Capra's _Meet_John_Doe_

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