Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: So, they've reached the limits of human endurance (Score 5, Insightful) 811

by scotts13 (#47845619) Attached to: 3 Recent Flights Make Unscheduled Landings, After Disputes Over Knee Room

You can't physically cram people any tighter, and fights are breaking out. Good. When they discover they're losing more on bad PR and flight diversions than they're gaining, they'll put back the inch or two - for a while. Now that they've reached bottom, the floor will just bounce from now on; the came couple of inches continually added and subtracted subtracted every 2-3 years, forever.

As far as blaming people for not buying an upgrade, has anyone saying this actually looked at prices? Last couple of times I flew, I looked into it; a little more room doesn't cost you 10% or 20%, it's more like double or triple the ticket price. Actually habitable travel accommodations are only for the wealthy.

Comment: Just by coincidence (Score 1) 91

by scotts13 (#47838141) Attached to: California Blue Whales Rebound From Whaling

Japan has just now announced they're resuming whaling for "scientific research" in defiance of a UN ban. They're after minke whales, and a smaller number of fin and humpback whales, not blues... but the timing is odd. Maybe they think Sea Shepherd will be confused, and think they don't have to show up?

Comment: Re:Or he was actually crazy (Score 2) 441

by scotts13 (#47810907) Attached to: In Maryland, a Soviet-Style Punishment For a Novelist

We still don't have any facts, other than public officials covering their posteriors. We "know" he wrote a letter someone didn't like. Only that. You go to psych lockup for writing one letter these days?

"McLaw's letter was of primary concern to healthcare officials, Maciarello says. It, combined with complaints of alleged harassment and an alleged possible crime from various jurisdictions led to his suspension. Maciarello cautions that these allegations are still being investigated; authorities, he says, "proceeded with great restraint."

Alleged possible crime? As in, we don't know if it happened, and we're not sure it was a crime?

Comment: It's all ass covering (Score 2) 421

by scotts13 (#47738987) Attached to: South Carolina Student Arrested For "Killing Pet Dinosaur"

God forbid the kid ever does anything violent for the rest of his life. Then, everything he's ever written, said, or done comes under scrutiny. And anyone who ever saw it, and didn't report it to "proper authorities" goes under the bus with him. Gotta over your ass, just in case.

Not-news for these "authorities" - there isn't a teenage boy (or a lot of girls) born that hasn't fantasized violence, against more than an entirely fictional dinosaur, at least once. A lot of them even write it down. But as long as they don't know about it, no one cares.

Comment: Allowed to retire without disciplinary action (Score 1) 127

by scotts13 (#47654729) Attached to: DEA Paid Amtrak Employee To Pilfer Passenger Lists

That's just amazing. Any company I've worked for, I'd be strung up by the heels for giving away customer data, let alone selling it for the better part of a million dollars. One article notes "It was not clear whether the DEA has rules against soliciting corporate insiders to provide confidential customer information in exchange for money." Really, they need a specific rule against that? I can see a DEA official whispering in someone's ear "Shut up, shut up, let it go and just let her retire."

Comment: Explore the past (Score 2) 246

by scotts13 (#47641275) Attached to: I'd most like to (personally) explore:

I'm more a historian than an explorer. It really bothers me to walk around my former mining town, only 150 years old, and there are old structures (foundations, dams, remnants of bridges, etc.) that no one remember what they were from. Wish there were easier ways to research them; have to get to work on that flux capacitor.

Comment: What to cut (Score 4, Informative) 114

by scotts13 (#47544773) Attached to: SpaceX Executive Calls For $22-25 Billion NASA Budget

Give NASA the $14 billion spent in fiscal 2013 training foreign armies and providing them with weapons. That'll make up the difference nicely. Not enough? Move on to the $24 billion spent on the "National Drug Control Strategy." Two things we don't need more of are dead bodies and prison inmates.

Comment: Re:Death bell tolling for thee.... (Score 1) 322

by scotts13 (#47521719) Attached to: Microsoft's CEO Says He Wants to Unify Windows

I have to agree. I think I understand why they want to do this: Only one code base, less overhead and more profit.

But it is a stupid idea. The different devices provide different functions and shouldn't look the same or be the same. Servers are different from desktops which are different from tablets which are different from phones.

For those who need a bad car analogy, it is like trying to put the same user interface on bicycles, motorcycles, cars, trucks and trains. No one complains that their car doesn't have handlebars. Or that there is no steering wheel on a their bicycle or motorcycle.

I well recall the cries of "Windows Everywhere!" (and Windows CE that went with it). As you note, they want this for the same reasons the government wants to standardize the military aircraft they buy - saving money by re-using common components. Problem is, something that does everything does nothing well; witness the F-35 and the TFX/F-111. Worst thing is, it never actually costs less, anyway - you get an inferior product with higher costs.

Comment: Re:PPC macs were awful (Score 2) 236

by scotts13 (#47474673) Attached to: Nearly 25 Years Ago, IBM Helped Save Macintosh

Macs didn't "make USB", they forced it on their users while giving a big "fuck you" to all of their old customers running anything else. It's not like the old stuff was horrible either (ADB, SCSI).

It was a little annoying that Apple made the jump all at once into USB, but really - a couple of RS422 ports was better? ADB was always only for mice and keyboards, and years of experience showed that for most users, SCSI was just too expensive and hard to set up. Or don't you remember "SCSI Hell"? For higher end Macs, you could retrofit SCSI, serial, and even USB cards if you really needed to. Some configurations even included a SCSI card.

As far as "USB was everywhere on PC's" that's just wrong. At the time Apple switched over, 99% of PC users had never heard of a USB port. I know, I was managing a computer store at the time.

Comment: Another misleading headline (Score 5, Informative) 236

by scotts13 (#47473717) Attached to: Nearly 25 Years Ago, IBM Helped Save Macintosh

I was working very closely with Apple at the time, and unless everyone was being lied to, "IBM saved Macintosh" is a pretty serious mischaracterization. More like three companies working together to create a platform useful to all the contributors. Did IBM put more into it than the other AIM members? Probably. But they didn't do it out of the goodness of their hearts.

I go on working for the same reason a hen goes on laying eggs. -- H.L. Mencken

Working...