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Comment Re:Microsoft is "igniting" PC sales... (Score 1) 183

Besides, Google has been doing it for years, and look how popular Android is.

Actually, Google works hard to make sure that users *do* own their own devices, or at least can. All Nexus devices are unlockable, and Google encourages OEMs to allow unlocking as well. Plus the whole open source thing.

Also, the common /. meme that Android reports on everything you do is simply false. Android the OS doesn't talk to Google at all. Google apps do, to the degree that you want to use them.

(Disclaimer: I'm a Google engineer, I work on Android, but I'm speaking only for myself, not for Google. Google has PR people for that; they pay me to write code.)

Comment Re:Are mass shootings a false flag? (Score 1) 83

In the case of the UCC shooter I do not believe so. I believe it is far more likely that autistic mom and autistic son shared an autistic obsession about guns. Autistic son had headbanging stim. Autistic Mom who was studying to be a nurse went crazy with the perscription meds to control the headbanging. One day, kid loses control, takes 6 guns out of the collection of more than 20, goes and shoots up the nearest gun-free zone he knows about, which happens to be the college he's enrolled in.

Seems very straightforward to me.

Comment Re:The missing link is mental illness (Score 1) 83

Your article failed to address side effects from antidepressant medication, which is the *specific* co-morbidity. Yes, general mental illness does not necessarily create violence, but it is specifically listed in the potential side effects of drugs like Zoloft and Lithium.

Suicide is also a danger with these drugs (which makes me think anti-depressants are rather, well, misnamed).

Suicide by cop even more so. And for that you need, gasp, potential or real random victims.

Comment Re:The missing link is mental illness (Score 1) 83

Yes, but a symptom that is comorbid enough with mass random shootings that I believe a medical records and prescriptions check should be a basic part of buying a gun from a licensed dealer.

You will still get idiots like Adam Lanza though, who obtain their weapons from family members. But maybe you'll at least notice the occasional guy living alone who tries to buy a gun legally, before he obtains one illegally, and goes to Forest Park in Portland, OR to take pot shots with a sniper rifle at Big Pink.

Comment Re:Not quite (Score 1) 208

While not an OEM per say, I have done this with a Windows 7 System Builder version. Install Win7 System Builder, Upgrade to Win10, reinstall Win7. I did not do the rollback: an actual fresh Windows 7 installation which then requires activation. The activation of Windows 7 upon reinstall worked just fine. Granted, System Builder != OEM, but still...

Now, whether I could -for example- replace the HDD in that machine and try to install Windows 10, that I don't know. The hash is indeed for the machine you upgraded with all hardware it had at that point. However, for many machines upgrading is not somethiing that will happen (think laptops). I had planned to try such a situation (upgrade with 4GB RAM, nuke, install 8GB RAM and then install a fresh 10 and see whether it activates), but I have only limited time.

Besides, they're so desperate to see 10 adoption, they'll look a lot though the fingers.

Comment Re:Not quite (Score 1) 208

To be more precise, from what I understand. You upgrade your license (the OEM SLP one or the one on your sticker, which are technically two different licenses. Draw your own conclusion from that and how you can abuse this). During the upgrade process, you get a new product key. This product key, from what I've seen, is the same for every machine that is upgraded. That Win10 product key, for Home, ends with 8HVX7, for Pro, ends with 3V66T. Google that if you want.

What really happens is that a hardware hash is sent to Microsoft during the upgrade process. This hardware hash allows you to use those generic keys in the future (well, depending whether you had Home or Pro... Obviously), which means you can just use the generic ISO Microsoft provides (Finally, an official re-installation ISO! I've been waiting years for that). You can not use those generic keys on non-hashed hardware (Yes, I tried to see what happens). It will not activate.

However, your 7 license will remain fully functional. At least, that's my experience.

What would be an interesting test would be the following: Install Windows 7 in a VM, clone it, but don't run the second instance. Start the first instance, upgrade to 10. Keep it on 10. Now launch the second instance, which is 7 and never upgrade it. See if both remain active. This definitely violates the Microsoft licenses you have, but it would be interesting to see what happens. My prediction: both stay activated, but I'm not sure. I haven't tested it.

Comment Re:Not quite (Score 1) 208

For all Windows machines I have under my control, I upgraded to secure the upgrade that I'll have to do in 2020 anyway. Then in clicked "go back to Windows 7" (well, actually, I didn't... It's easier to image the disk, do the upgrade, and restore from image).
I did this for all machines I have with an OEM license. For some machines, that run Linux, I even bothered to image Linux, install the OEM that came with it, upgrade, put back the Linux image. Why? Because, those machines might still be functional in 2020. It might not be me who will use it, and the future user might prefer 10, so I like to give the future user that option.

That is quite a lot of work, well mostly quite a lot of time, but that way I have the license, and I can continue to use whatever I like (7 or Linux), while keeping my options in the future open.

Top Ten Things Overheard At The ANSI C Draft Committee Meetings: (7) Well, it's an excellent idea, but it would make the compilers too hard to write.