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Comment: Re:Sure... (Score 1) 199

by riseoftheindividual (#22283504) Attached to: Time Warner Filtering iTunes Traffic?
. The alternative strategy you propose, i.e., pretend that they're not already regulated, or that you can turn the situation around without addressing the regulatory problem--- that strategy is guaranteed to fail.

I proposed no such thing, that you would twist my words like this speaks volumes about you.

Now, I didn't say they weren't regulated, nor did I pretend they weren't. nor did I advise any such thing. Care to demonstrate where I did?

The strategy I would advise does work, has worked before, can and will work again... ditch them and go to their competitors. If you do business with someone and they cause a problem for you, try to solve it yourself for christ's sake. Quit being a typical lazy ass american who thinks the government is some kind of magic geenie to be looked to every time a problem pops up. Asking the politicians who are owned by the very business you have a problem with to solve the problem before you even try yourself, is beyond naive, it's stupid and lazy.

You want to make an argument for cleaning up the political process so this isn't the case anymore, I'm all ears. Until you address the rampant problem of corporate ownership of our politicians, you're living in a dream world advocating this course of action.

It is much easier to suggest solutions when you know nothing about the problem.

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