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+ - Poetry for sysadmins: Shall I compare thee to a lumbering bear?->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Don't forget that tomorrow is Sysadmin Day — a good day to show love to the folks who save your butt again and again when you mess up your computer. Forget the chocolate and flowers, long-time sysadmin Sandra Henry-Stocker has tailored some poems to celebrate these under appreciated, hard-working souls."
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+ - Border official points gun at Boy Scout->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A central Iowa Boy Scout troop just returned from a three-week trip they will likely never forget.
Boy Scout Troop 111 Leader Jim Fox spelled out what happened to him and the Mid-Iowa Boy Scout Troop 111 as four van-loads of Scouts and adult volunteers tried to drive from Canada into Alaska.
Fox said one of the Scouts took a picture of a border official, which spurred agents to detain everyone in that van and search them and their belongings.
âoeThe agent immediately confiscated his camera, informed him he would be arrested, fined possibly $10,000 and 10 years in prison,â Fox said.
Another of the Scouts was taking luggage from the top of a van to be searched when something startling happened.
âoeHe hears a snap of a holster, turns around, and hereâ(TM)s this agent, both hands on a loaded pistol, pointing at the young manâ(TM)s head,â Fox explained."

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+ - For half, STEM degrees in computers, math or stats lead to other jobs->

Submitted by dcblogs
dcblogs (1096431) writes "The Census Bureau reports that only 26% of people with any type of four-year STEM degree are working in a STEM field. For those with a degree specifically in computer, math or statistics, the figure is 49%, nearly the same for engineering degrees. What happens to the other STEM trained workers? The largest numbers are managers at non-STEM businesses (22.5%), or having careers in education (17.7%), business/finance (13.2%) and office support (11.5%). Some other data points: Among those with college degrees in computer-related occupations, men are paid more than women ($90,354 vs. $78,859 on average), and African American workers are more likely to be unemployed than white or Asian workers."
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+ - 2 Factor Authentication in the Real World? Please share your story. 1

Submitted by Norsak
Norsak (1755552) writes "I work as an IT Manager. We have 1000 users on a Windows domain, a fairly common scenario
I personally doubt that implementing 2 Factor Authentication in my organization would be possible. If some of you have successfully upgraded a company to 2 factor authentication, I would be very interested in hearing about your experience.

My primary concern is:
There are so many different ways a user can currently use AD credentials.
Wouldn’t any Two Factor Authentication solution support fewer access permutations than the old Username + Password system it is replacing?

Here are some scenarios that come to mind:

- Offline Laptop cached credentials login
- Iphone & Android email login, as well as offline access to old emails.
- Non IIS webservers that use LDAP to authenticate against AD

My second concern is ease of use and its impact on user acceptance.
At the bank they plug smartcards into a reader; but solutions beyond the desktop, like Microsoft’s Azure MFA, appear much more clunky.

Please share your experiences."

+ - Internet Explorer Vulnerabilities Increase 100%

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Bromium Labs analyzed public vulnerabilities and exploits from the first six months of 2014. The research determined that Internet Explorer vulnerabilities have increased more than 100 percent since 2013 , surpassing Java and Flash vulnerabilities. Web browsers have always been a favorite avenue of attack, but we are now seeing that hackers are not only getting better at attacking Internet Explorer, they are doing it more frequently."

+ - The Psychology Of Phishing

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Phishing emails are without a doubt one of the biggest security issues consumers and businesses face today. Cybercriminals understand that we are a generation of clickers and they use this to their advantage. They will take the time to create sophisticated phishing emails because they understand that today users can tell-apart spam annoyances from useful email, however they still find it difficult identifying phishing emails, particularly when they are tailored to suit each recipient individually. Fake emails are so convincing and compelling that they fool 10% of recipients into clicking on the malicious link. To put that into context a legitimate marketing department at a FTSE 100 company typically expects less than a 2% click rate on their advertising campaigns. So, how are the cybercriminals out-marketing the marketing experts?"

+ - Verizon's offer: Let us track you, get free stuff->

Submitted by mpicpp
mpicpp (3454017) writes "Are you comfortable having your location and Web browsing tracked for marketing purposes? If so, Verizon's got a deal for you.

The wireless giant announced a new program this week called "Smart Rewards" that offers customers credit card-style perks like discounts for shopping, travel and dining. You accrue points through the program by doing things like signing onto the Verizon website, paying your bill online and participating in the company's trade-in program.

Verizon emphasizes that the data it collects is anonymized before it's shared with third parties.
The program is novel in that offers Verizon users some compensation for the collection of their data, which has become big business for telecom and tech companies. Some privacy advocates have pushed data-collecting companies to reward customers for their personal information in the interest of transparency."

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+ - Intel Launches Self-Encrypting SSD 2500 Pro Solid State Drive->

Submitted by MojoKid
MojoKid (1002251) writes "Intel just launched their new SSD 2500 Pro series solid state drive, the follow-up to last year's SSD 1500 Pro series, which targets corporate and small-business clients. The drive shares much of its DNA with some of Intel's consumer-class drives, but the Pro series cranks things up a few notches with support for advanced security and management features, low power states, and an extended management toolset. In terms of performance, the Intel SSD 2500 Pro isn't class-leading in light of many enthusiast-class drives but it's no slouch either. Intel differentiates the 2500 Pro series by adding support for vPro remote-management and hardware-based self-encryption. The 2500 Pro series supports TCG (Trusted Computing Group) Opal 2.0 features and is Microsoft eDrive capable as well. Intel also offers an administration tool for easy management of the drive. With the Intel administration tool, users can even reset the PSID (physical presence security ID), though the contents of the drive will be wiped. The SSD 2500 Pro series of solid state drives will be offered in both 2.5" SATA (7mm Z-Height) and M.2 "gumstick" form factors, with capacities ranging from 120GB on up to 480GB. Sequential reads are rated at up to 540MB/s, sequential writes at up to 480MB/s, with 45K – 80K random read / write IOps."
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+ - Autonomous Sea-Robot Survives Massive Typhoon->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Liquid Robotics and its Wave Glider line of autonomous seafaring robots became famous when Java inventor James Gosling left Google to join the company. Now one of its robots has passed an impressive real-world test, shrugging off a monster typhoon in the South China Sea that inflicted hundreds of millions of dollars of damage on the region."
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+ - A Drone Saved an Elderly Man Who Had Been Missing for Three Days

Submitted by Jason Koebler
Jason Koebler (3528235) writes "A drone was just used to save a life: Earlier this week, an elderly man who was missing for three days was found with the help of a drone in Wisconsin.
82-year-old Guillermo DeVenecia had been missing for three days. Search dogs, a helicopter, and hundreds of volunteers had spent days looking for him. David Lesh, a Colorado-based skier and drone pilot decided to look for him using his drone—and found him within 20 minutes."

+ - Android Simplocker Ransomware Hits English-Speaking Users

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Simplocker, the first Android ransomware that actually encrypts files located on the device, has begun to target English-speaking users, ESET researchers warn. The new version shows a message sporting the FBI logo and asks users to pay a fine in the amount of $300 (via MoneyPak voucher) in order to get their device unblocked and their files decrypted. It also displays the camera feed from the device in order to make it seem that the authorities know how the user looks like."

+ - Laser Eye Surgery, Revisited 10 years Later->

Submitted by gunner_von_diamond
gunner_von_diamond (3461783) writes "I was just reading a story on ./ from 10 years ago today, about Lasik Eye Surgery. Personally, I've had Lasik done and loved every single part of the surgery. I went from wearing contacts/glasses every day to having 20/15 vision! In the older post, everyone seemed to be cautious about it, waiting for technical advances to get the surgery done. In present day, the surgery is fairly inexpensive [even for a programmer :) ], takes about 10-15 minutes for the actual surgery, and I recovered from the surgery that same day. So my question is, what is holding everyone else back from being reliant on contacts and/or glasses?"
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+ - HARKEN System Monitors Drivers' Fatigue Levels Via Their Seat->

Submitted by Zothecula
Zothecula (1870348) writes "It was just last week that we heard about how researchers from Nottingham Trent University are looking at embedding heart rate sensors in car seats, to detect when drivers are nodding off. Well, it turns out that they're not the only ones. A consortium of European companies and institutes is developing a similar system known as HARKEN, which uses seat-located sensors to monitor both the driver's heart rate and their rate of respiration."
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+ - Privately-funded study to test coconut oil as treatment for Alzheimer's->

Submitted by Jesrad
Jesrad (716567) writes "Following the growing viral popularity of Dr Mary Newport's reported success in treating her Alzheimer's Disease-stricken husband with coconut oil, and some positive results of in-vitro tests, come news of a clinical trial of coconut oil as a potential treatment for halting and reversing symptoms of the neuron-destroying disease."
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+ - Google Offers a Cool Million Bucks For a Better Inverter

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "With the Little Box Challenge, Google (and IEEE, and a few other sponsors like Cree and Rohm) is offering a $1 million prize to the team which can "design and build a kW-scale inverter with the highest power density (at least 50 Watts per cubic inch)." Going from cooler-sized to tablet sized, they say, would make whole lot of things better, and the prize is reserved for the best performing entrant.

"Our testing philosophy is to not look inside the box. You provide us with a box that has 5 wires coming out of it: two DC inputs, two AC outputs and grounding connection and we only monitor what goes into and comes out of those wires, along with the temperature of the outside of your box, over the course of 100 hours of testing. The inverter will be operating in an islanded more—that is, not tied or synced to an external grid. The loads will be dynamically changing throughout the course of the testing, similar to what you may expect to see in a residential setting." he application must be filled out in English, but any serious applicants can sign up, "regardless of approach suggested or team background, will be successful in registering." Registration runs though September.

#power #google #invertor #contest #ieee #technology"

We gave you an atomic bomb, what do you want, mermaids? -- I. I. Rabi to the Atomic Energy Commission

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