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Comment: Your employer (Score 5, Insightful) 81

by redmid17 (#47964787) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Who Should Pay Costs To Attend Conferences?
They should be bearing the cost of the training and conferences. The only time I've shelled out cash for anything was when I didn't prepare enough for a certification test and needed to retake it. That was all on me though. Had I studied a bit more, I'd have passed on the first time.

Companies that want to retain talent need to shell out for training and conferences, especially if the budget isn't a concern for the time being. It's not as if they squirrel that money away for a rainy day. If the conference is as relevant to your work as you say and isn't insanely expensive, this should be a slam dunk.

Comment: Re:Why just guns? (Score 1) 264

by redmid17 (#47957395) Attached to: Using Wearable Tech To Track Gun Use
There's essentially no difference between purchasing a firearm in the US vs CH, assuming one is not a prohibited person in either country*
The only real substantive difference is the statutory vs constitutional issue. The universal militia service is a misnomer, since the majority of swiss can purchase a firearm but don't serve in the military. There are even parts of the US where you get a purchase permit (MN, NJ, CT, CA, DC, IL). I live in a state where I have to have a permit/license to purchase a gun. Frankly I think it's a bit ridiculous as the process to get said permit is identical to what I need to do to purchase the gun. Lots of redundancy that doesn't really accomplish much.

* Swiss law bans several nationalities/ethnicities from purchasing firearms (primarily Balkans peoples). They can do that as its firearm ownership is a statutory allowance in CH versus a civil right in the US.

Comment: Re:Why just guns? (Score 1) 264

by redmid17 (#47951137) Attached to: Using Wearable Tech To Track Gun Use
"We" didn't cross talk. You can't read the conversation properly. What is required to get that 'license' in CH? A instantaneous background check? By the way, it's not a license, it's a permit. Literally the only difference is stopping at the police station and forking over some cash. The US simplified the process, most likely because it's a civil right in the US to bear arms and it's not in Switzerland. And once again, there is a difference between a carry permit and a purchase permit

Comment: Re:Why just guns? (Score 1) 264

by redmid17 (#47932007) Attached to: Using Wearable Tech To Track Gun Use
That's wasn't the point of the OP or my refutation. That's something you invented out of thin air. It's more or less as easy to get a gun in Switzerland as it is the US. It requires a passed background check (and some additional cash in CH). Muzzleloaders are free of background checks in both countries. No militia or firearms training is required to own a gun in either country. Only difference is point of sale versus at the police station. If you want to get into carry permits, well you'll find it very similar in the US. In the big cities and a lot of states, carry permits are impossible to get. In other, especially rural states, they aren't difficult to get at all (or you don't need them period). Same with urban vs rural cantons in CH.

Comment: Re:Why just guns? (Score 1) 264

by redmid17 (#47910661) Attached to: Using Wearable Tech To Track Gun Use
Good for you. Doesn't mean you're not wrong as shit.

I've visited a few times and saw people carrying guns on the train (ostensibly for militia training or a shooting competition). Weapon shops weren't out of the way either. The only real difference between Switzerland and most of the US, is that you need to buy a "purchase permit" which is when they run their background check (identical to the US one) instead of running it at the time of purchase and they require private sales to be tracked, which is something that needs to be happen in more US states.

Save the whales. Collect the whole set.

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