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Comment: Re:Virgin Mary grilled cheese (Score 1) 127

by myowntrueself (#48923763) Attached to: Facebook Censoring Images of the Prophet Muhammad In Turkey

After hearing about the grilled cheese sandwich that looks like the virgin Mary I read this headline and the image that comes to mind is a roast turkey where the pattern of browning on the skin sort of looks like an image of the prophet Muhammad.

Then I think Facebook is being biased. If they allowed pictures of the virgin Mary grilled cheese then they shouldn't censor pictures of the Muhammad roast turkey.

Then I imagine extremists shouting "death to the turkey!"

(News can me so much more entertaining if you allow yourself to be creative.)

The thing is, no one would know it was an image of the prophet Mohammed because no one knows what he looked like.

And the worst part is, how will Facebooks system be able to tell the difference between an image thats 'supposed to be that one Mohammed who was the prophet' and an image thats of one of the millions of Muslims around the world whose name is 'Mohammed'??

Comment: Re:Chromebook Shmomebook (Score 1) 169

by tlambert (#48921191) Attached to: Google Just Made It Easier To Run Linux On Your Chromebook

Why doesn't RedHat, or Oracle, or SUSE, or someone else run Linux through the compliance tests?

Primarily? Because it won't pass the testing without a lot of work. In particular, there are negative assertion tests on header files (some things are not allowed to be dragged into the namespace, and the header are promiscuous). There's also a whole bunch of testing having to do with full and almost-full devices. There are also signal issues and process group membership issues. For example, you can "escape" an exclusion group on Linux by setting your default group to one of your other groups; Linux overwrites the membership in cr_groups[0] as a synonym for cr_gid, and doesn't handle POSIX saved IDs quite right, either (Neither do the BSDs, so this isn't a Linux-only problem).

Last time I attempted to run the test suit on Linux as a lark, there were about 20K failures (mostly tests not compiling because of it bailing out over the header file issues. There are also some parts of the system that have been subsumed by systemd; this isn't intrinsically a problem on its own, so long as the system *also* supports flat config files as an addendum, at least for some aspects of logging.

Also, getting the UUCP to work over USB serial dongles is likely to be something of a bear, unless you make the HDB modifications for handling the "rung indicate" as a notification to take the shared file lock on the callout device so the getty's don't start trying to chat with each other.

Finally, there some considerable legal/licensing issues for the trademark.

Comment: Re:Open source code is open for everyone (Score 4, Informative) 194

by myowntrueself (#48918351) Attached to: Serious Network Function Vulnerability Found In Glibc

FOSS *is* more secure, and that's true even with the occasional vulnerability.

Loooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooool.

Its true *ESPECIALLY* with the occasional vulnerability because thats a vulnerability thats been found, publicised and fixed unlike in the proprietary shit where the vulnerability will be found by a limited group of people and kept secret so they can use it.

Oh, you mean those nice folks over in Eastern Europe?

and the intelligence network of the 5 main english speaking nations...

Comment: Re:Heartbleed (Score 1) 194

by myowntrueself (#48918105) Attached to: Serious Network Function Vulnerability Found In Glibc

Apparently "many eyes" were not reading that bit of code.

Will you please actually read the quote rather than quoting an inorrect interpretation. The quote is:

"given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow"

It means that once a bug is found, it is shallow, i.e. quick and easy to solve for someone. It doesn't and never did mean that all bugs will be found.

'many eyes' weren't reading that bit of code.

But you can fucking bet that 5 eyes were reading that bit of code!

Comment: Re:Heartbleed (Score 1) 194

by myowntrueself (#48918101) Attached to: Serious Network Function Vulnerability Found In Glibc

That's great in theory, but no one likes reading lines and lines of old code looking for a potential error. Know what? Even fewer people do it for free. At least in proprietary software, people are paid to do it.

In proprietary software and free alike many people are paid to do it.

They do it so their masters can then exploit the bugs they find and pry into your private life, hack your bank accounts and generally fuck with you.

Comment: Re:Open source code is open for everyone (Score 2, Informative) 194

by myowntrueself (#48917957) Attached to: Serious Network Function Vulnerability Found In Glibc

FOSS *is* more secure, and that's true even with the occasional vulnerability.

Loooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooool.

Its true *ESPECIALLY* with the occasional vulnerability because thats a vulnerability thats been found, publicised and fixed unlike in the proprietary shit where the vulnerability will be found by a limited group of people and kept secret so they can use it.

Comment: Re:Who are you? I'm bat- er, ANON! (Score 1) 408

Pedophiles are like Nazis

You have that backwards. Pedophiles are the group that society wants to watch burn. The group that nobody will cry for as they are marched to the stake, or the concentration camp, or the guillotine. The group that politicians use as moral grounds for passing laws based on hate and vigilantism instead of justice.

It's a slippery slope my friends.

Pretty soon it'll be people who are suspected of having harbored lustful thoughts of girls who appear to be under age.

That and camera technology in the posters you see everywhere advertising clothes/makeup etc for young girls so that men whose eyes linger just a little too long on the poster are flagged as potential pedos.

Comment: Re:They better be damn sure we're not home... (Score 1) 386

Most of us practice head shots for hours at a time.

People in the South tend to have guns within reach at all times; what could possibly go wrong? :)

As I replied to a similar comment below.

Do you idiots seriously believe that if the government was going to target you for surveillance, and go to the length of breaking into your home in order to bug it, that they would do so while you were there????

Some people never leave their homes though! I guess the ultimate in defence against this kind of thing is being a shut-in!

Comment: Re:Good (Score 1) 386

>> Me too. It's a hell of a lot harder to bug every man, woman, and child in the west than it is to intercept and crawl their communications

You don't need to do that.
You just put a worm or backdoor in all these peoples smartphones :)

>> bug every man, woman, and child in the west

The east attempted that before '89, didn't work so well

It didn't work out that badly either. You don't directly spy on everyone; you give everyone a really good incentive to spy on everyone else for you. Kind of what 5 eyes does but on a more personal level.

Comment: Thank fricking God it requires developer mode. (Score 0) 169

by tlambert (#48890511) Attached to: Google Just Made It Easier To Run Linux On Your Chromebook

Thank fricking God it requires developer mode.

That is all. A number of us fricking killed ourselves to make sure the thing would notify you when someone had futzed with your machine, and it'd be a terrible shame if 3 minutes and a screwdriver could trojan your machine.

Comment: Re:Chromebook Shmomebook (Score 4, Informative) 169

by tlambert (#48890479) Attached to: Google Just Made It Easier To Run Linux On Your Chromebook

Wake me up when they post a useful article on how to run Unix on my Macbook Pro.

Mac OS X *is* UNIX. It's certified. Wake me up when Linux passes conformance testing.

PS: We even put UUCP on the damn thing to pass the tests; it's definitely UNIX, so feel free to spin up your own NetNews node on your MacBook Air.

Comment: And now... 3... 2... 1... (Score 2) 110

by tlambert (#48881301) Attached to: Barrett Brown, Formerly of Anonymous, Sentenced To 63 Months

And now... 3... 2... 1...

(1) Find a journalist you don't like who has linked to a vulnerable site they don't control
(2) Replace the content at the link target with illegally obtained material about someone powerful
(3) Sit back and watch how well the new SWATting works!

Journalistic shield laws anyone? The new first amendment-resistant law enforcement looks like we need something to replace the old antibiotics...

The gent who wakes up and finds himself a success hasn't been asleep.

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