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Comment: Re:Well, this 1995 CD-r seems OK (Score 2) 434

by prestwich (#40725459) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Storing Items In a Sealed Chest For 25 Years?

Well, not too bad,

dg@major:~$ dd if=/dev/sr0 of=/dev/null bs=1024k
dd: reading `/dev/sr0': Input/output error
580+1 records in
580+1 records out
608698368 bytes (609 MB) copied, 179.877 s, 3.4 MB/s

[32062.556698] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0] Unhandled sense code
[32062.556704] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0]
[32062.556707] Result: hostbyte=DID_OK driverbyte=DRIVER_SENSE
[32062.556710] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0]
[32062.556712] Sense Key : Medium Error [current]
[32062.556717] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0]
[32062.556720] Add. Sense: Unrecovered read error
[32062.556723] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0] CDB:
[32062.556725] Read(10): 28 00 00 04 89 00 00 00 30 00
[32062.556736] end_request: I/O error, dev sr0, sector 1188864
[32062.556742] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297216
[32062.556748] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297217
[32062.556756] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297218
[32062.556758] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297219
[32062.556761] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297220
[32062.556764] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297221
[32062.556766] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297222
[32062.556769] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297223
[32062.556771] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297224
[32062.556774] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297225
[32069.527607] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0] Unhandled sense code
[32069.527613] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0]
[32069.527616] Result: hostbyte=DID_OK driverbyte=DRIVER_SENSE
[32069.527619] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0]
[32069.527621] Sense Key : Medium Error [current]
[32069.527626] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0]
[32069.527629] Add. Sense: Unrecovered read error
[32069.527632] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0] CDB:
[32069.527634] Read(10): 28 00 00 04 89 00 00 00 02 00
[32069.527646] end_request: I/O error, dev sr0, sector 1188864
[32069.527650] quiet_error: 38 callbacks suppressed
[32069.527653] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297216
[32069.527658] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297217
[32076.499895] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0] Unhandled sense code
[32076.499901] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0]
[32076.499904] Result: hostbyte=DID_OK driverbyte=DRIVER_SENSE
[32076.499907] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0]
[32076.499909] Sense Key : Medium Error [current]
[32076.499914] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0]
[32076.499917] Add. Sense: Unrecovered read error
[32076.499920] sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0] CDB:
[32076.499922] Read(10): 28 00 00 04 89 00 00 00 02 00
[32076.499934] end_request: I/O error, dev sr0, sector 1188864
[32076.499938] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297216
[32076.499943] Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 297217

so I'd say it looks like it's found at least 2 bad logical blocks on the CD, and I suspect it eventually
retried it OK, because a df on the mounted CD shows 581M which MB v MiB is equivalent to the 609 figure
that came out of the dd - so I reckon it eventually (after a try or two) read the lot.

Dave

Comment: Well, this 1995 CD-r seems OK (Score 1) 434

by prestwich (#40724173) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Storing Items In a Sealed Chest For 25 Years?

/me takes dusty 1995 Linux CD-R that we wrote off shelf, and puts it in:

dg@major:/media/CDROM$ ls -l
total 575
dr-xr-sr-x 3 dg dg 69632 Jul 12 1995 bitmaps
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 2048 Jul 5 1995 ddd
-r--r--r-- 1 dg dg 441397 Jul 18 1995 DirList.180795
dr-xr-sr-x 13 dg dg 6144 Jul 18 1995 documentation
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 4096 Jul 10 1995 ELF-GCC
dr-xr-sr-x 10 dg dg 2048 Jul 11 1995 emulators
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 2048 Jul 5 1995 fvwm
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 18432 Jul 10 1995 gnu
dr-xr-sr-x 11 dg dg 2048 Jul 10 1995 kernel-source
dr-xr-sr-x 3 dg dg 2048 Jul 11 1995 languages
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 6144 Jul 18 1995 leftovers
-r--r-xr-- 1 dg dg 99 Jul 13 1995 Leftovers_dir_list
dr-xr-sr-x 7 dg dg 4096 Jul 12 1995 logos
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 2048 Jul 11 1995 Networking
dr-xr-sr-x 6 dg dg 2048 Jul 18 1995 pgp
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 2048 Jul 11 1995 Printing
-r--r-xr-- 1 dg dg 5814 Jul 18 1995 README.html
dr-xr-sr-x 11 dg dg 4096 Jul 10 1995 slakware
dr-xr-sr-x 4 dg dg 2048 Jul 18 1995 sunsite.unc.edu
-r--r--r-- 1 dg dg 1015 Jul 18 1995 TRANS.TBL
dr-xr-sr-x 5 dg dg 2048 Jul 10 1995 www
dr-xr-sr-x 3 dg dg 4096 Jul 11 1995 X
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 2048 Jul 5 1995 xemacs

Looks ok :-) That's been stored on a dusty shelf in my room for the last ~17 years (in jewel
case) having said that it was a good quality kodak blank, and your mileage may vary.

IMHO store multiple copies written on multiple vendors media written on multiple drives;
use a few types of storage (CD, USB-flash from a good vendor), and something like
laser printed (not-ink jet) QR code on good paper; I'd wrap each separately (hmm what in?)

Oh, and in 25 years come back and tell us how much data is visible.

Science

+ - M-Carbon: 50yro mystery solved-> 1

Submitted by slew
slew (2918) writes "Unlike its more famous carbon cousins: diamonds and fullerenes, you've probably never heard of M-Carbon, but this form of compressed graphite which is as hard as diamonds has baffled researcher for half a century. Over the past few years, many theoretical computations have suggested at least a dozen different crystal structures for this phase of carbon, but new experiments showed that only one crystal structure fits the data: M-carbon."
Link to Original Source
Data Storage

+ - Asus Implements USB 3.0 Attached SCSI Protocol for Measurable Performance Gains->

Submitted by
MojoKid
MojoKid writes "When USB debuted in 1999, it offered maximum throughput of 12Mb/s. Today, USB 3.0 offers 4.8Gb/s. Interestingly, modern USB 3 controllers use the same Bulk-Only Transport (BOT) protocol that first debuted in 1999. Before the advent of USB 3, relying on BOT made sense. Since hard drives were significantly faster than the USB 2 bus itself, the HDD was always going to be waiting on the host controller. USB 3 changed that. With 4.8Gbits/s of throughput (600MB/s), only the highest-end hardware is capable of saturating the bus. That's exposed some of BOT's weaknesses. UASP, or the USB Attached SCSI Protocol, is designed to fix these limitations, and bring USB 3 fully into the 21st century. It does this by implementing queue functions, reducing command latency, and allowing the device to transfer commands and data independently from each other. Asus is the first manufacturer to have implemented UASP in current generation motherboards and the benchmarks show transfer speeds can be improved significantly."
Link to Original Source
Australia

+ - Australian Sex Party threatens Google after ad spat->

Submitted by niftydude
niftydude (1745144) writes "Australian newspaper The Age is carrying the story:

The Australian Sex Party has threatened Google with legal action after the search engine refused to run its ads on the eve of tomorrow's Melbourne by-election.

It comes after Sex Party ads were blocked by Google at the last federal election because the company — which is typically opposed to censorship — perceived the text as too racy (the ads were reinstated by Google the day before the election).

Sex Party candidate Fiona Patten said this time the search giant said it would not approve her ads "because we have a donate button on our page and we're not a charity".

Don't all political parties allow donations? Is google imposing it's own sense of morality onto australian politics?"

Link to Original Source
Hardware Hacking

Home-Built Turing Machine 123

Posted by Soulskill
from the i'll-order-a-dozen dept.
stronghawk writes "The creator of the Nickel-O-Matic is back at it and has now built a Turing Machine from a Parallax Propeller chip-based controller, motors, a dry-erase marker and a non-infinite supply of shiny 35mm leader film. From his FAQ: 'While thinking about Turing machines I found that no one had ever actually built one, at least not one that looked like Turing's original concept (if someone does know of one, please let me know). There have been a few other physical Turing machines like the Logo of Doom, but none were immediately recognizable as Turing machines. As I am always looking for a new challenge, I set out to build what you see here.'"
Power

Entergy Admits 2005 Tritium Leak 385

Posted by Soulskill
from the what's-a-few-neutrons-among-friends dept.
mdsolar writes "The leaking Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant was hit last week by a whistleblower allegation that a previous tritium leak had occurred. Now the parent company, Entergy, has admitted the occurrence of at least one prior leak to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This is particularly significant for three reasons: because the leak occurred in pipes that company officials later testified under oath did not exist, because the Vermont Senate will likely soon vote to deny Entergy a needed approval to extend the power plant's license for another 20 years, and because President Obama just put taxpayers on the hook for new nuclear power plants in Georgia."

I never cheated an honest man, only rascals. They wanted something for nothing. I gave them nothing for something. -- Joseph "Yellow Kid" Weil

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