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Open Source

+ - Type safety coming to DB queries

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A new type-safe query language for the popular full-text search platform Solr, called Slashem (a Rogue-like), hash just been released. Slashem is implemented as a DSL in Scala providing compile time type-safety, allowing you do things like date range queries against date fields but keeping you from trying to do a date range query against a string field. Hopefully this trend catches on, resulting in less invalid queries exploding at runtime."
Open Source

+ - A new DSL for querying Solr

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A new type-safe query language for Solr, called Slashem (a Rogue-like), hash just been released. Slashem is implemented as a DSL in Scala providing compile time type-safety, allowing you do things like date range queries against date fields but keeping you from trying to do a date range query against a string field. Hopefully this catches on, resulting in less invalid queries exploding at runtime."
Open Source

+ - Compile time type safety coming to ORMs

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Who among us has not written a query that exploded at runtime? Some ORMs provide rudimentery checking (like making sure the field exists), but new open source projects from Foursquare are hoping to catch more errors at compile time. Named after popular RPGs, Rogue and Slashem (a rogue-like) provide compile time type safe querying for both Mongo and Solr."
Privacy

+ - Are Some CAs Too Big to Fail?->

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "In the wake of this weekend's revelations of the seriousness of the attack on certificate authority DigiNotar, security experts have renewed criticism of the Internet's digital certificate infrastructure, with some wondering if larger certificate authorities (CAs) might be too big to fail.

Would Mozilla and Microsoft and Google have revoked trust in root certificates from VeriSign or Thawte had they been compromised? Unlikely.

"It's not a simple matter of removing certificates from a database, because they're not in any databases," says researcher Moxie Marlinspike, who presented an alternative approach to the current SSL infrastructure last month at DEFCON. "We may never track them all down.""

Link to Original Source
Open Source

+ - Automatic spelling corrections on Github

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Github projects may be seeing a different kind of contributor than normal, a small little bot is now crawling projects contribution spelling corrections. It builds on top the github API and existing documentation style checking code. Future directions for the project look beyond spelling mistakes and at automated bug fixing on a large scale."

+ - Microsoft attempts to censure bing vulnerability

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft's bing search engine has a vulnerability with its cash-back promotion, which impacts both merchants and customers. In traditional Microsoft style, Microsoft responded to the author of the breaking bing cashback with a cease & desist letter, rather than fixing the security problems. It is possible for a malicous user to create fake bing cash-back requests, resulting in not only fake cash-back costs for the merchant, but also blocking legitimate customers from receiving there cash-back from bing. The original post is currently available in bing's cahce (although perhaps not for long). But no worries, the author makes it clear that the exploit should be painfully obvious to anyone that reads the bing cashback sdk."
Programming

Google's Launches 2nd Android Developer Contest 26

Posted by timothy
from the don't-worry-only-at-nexus-2 dept.
coffeeisclassy writes "Google's second Android Developer Contest (ADC2) has started, despite some confusion around how to submit applications. The prizes are different from the first ADC, with each category having prizes of 100k, 50k, and 25k and an overall best of 150k,50k and 25k, meaning the best Android application from ADC2 is eligible for ~250k. The rules seem to allow any application never published before August 1st to compete, and the contest is open through the end of August (so break out your keyboards!). The top prizes are certainly less than that of first ADC, but with the prizes broken down by category, Google may be hoping to inspire some love for less popular categories."
Google

+ - Google's 2nd Android Developer Contest kicksoff 1

Submitted by coffeeisclassy
coffeeisclassy (991791) writes "Google's second Android Developer Contest (ADC2) has started, despite some confusion around how to submit applications. The prizes are different from the first ADC, with each category having prizes of 100k, 50k, and 25k and an overall best of 150k,50k and 25k, meaning the best Android application from ADC2 is eligible for ~250k. The rules seem to allow any application never published before August 1st to compete and is open through the end of August (so break out your keyboards!). The top prizes are certainly less than that of first ADC, but with the prizes broken down by category Google may be hoping to inspire some love for less popular categories. While some other developers are waiting to find out to submit, one developer has moved ahead and released one of there entires Pigs Can Fly Site Monitor (also on Google Market for those with Androids). So if you've been waiting for an excuse to start a new side-project, here you have it :)"
Cellphones

+ - DeviceScape port to OpenMoko finished & availa

Submitted by crazyirishhobo
crazyirishhobo (1130599) writes "As slashdot reported awhile ago on the start of a port of device scape to the OpenMoko, the port is now been completed and is available for public download. However like other things in the OpenMoko community (including the phones), it appears that it has reached the end of the line, with the developer behind it apparently moving to the Android platform."
Earth

+ - Classified evidence of global warming revealed->

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "The Obama administration has released more than a thousand intelligence images of Arctic ice, following a declassification request by the National Academy of Sciences. These high-resolution spy photos of rapid sea ice loss off the northern coast of Alaska, kept classified by the Bush administration, show the devastating impact of global warming in the Arctic. The newly-declassified images also reveal the retreat of glaciers in Washington and Alaska."
Link to Original Source
Privacy

+ - Your browser history is showing

Submitted by tiffanydanica
tiffanydanica (1347719) writes "For a lot of us our browser history is something we consider private, or at least not something we want to expose to every website we visit.Web2.0collage is showing just how easy it is (with code!)for sites to determine what sites you visit. When you visit the site it sniffs your browser history, and creates a collage of the (safe for work) sites that you visit. It is an interesting application of potentially scary technology (imagine a job application site using this to screen candidates). You can jump right into having your history sniffed if you so desire. While the collages are cool on their own merit, they also serve as an illustration of the privacy implications of browser history sniffing."

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