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Comment Re:Judging by the story so far... (Score 2) 367

Not all the AM users were cheating spouses. There were also quite a lot of non-cheating spouses checking on who was listed, non-married or divorced people, and users who never got to the meeting-up stage. I'm sure there were a bunch of students genuinely doing research from the profiles' info, too. And they're all affected the same way.

Comment Re:The Sad Puppies won. (Score 3, Insightful) 1034

But the S.F. readers get bored of it much faster... Only the people who think they have a religious duty to "correct" reality have the patience, energy and engagement to stick around when everything goes eye-rollingly consternating.

I had not heard of this whole mess before today, and I find it already tedious just searching for basic factual information about WTF happened and who has been an arsehole and who stuffed whose ballots. I was just hoping to learn of exciting new authors, and now it feels like I'm somehow reading a Twitter argument between some random MRA and my transgender SJW sister.

Comment And another 'heretic' theory... (Score 3, Interesting) 110

... is that hybridization might play a very big role in the appearance of new species, in several different ways:
- apomixis, producing some (most often aneuploid) news organism (which then clones itself indefinitely by fragmentation, budding or parthenogeny, becoming a distinct species all by itself)
- polyploidization, where the different DNA sets just add up and coexist side by side (like in pretty much every angiosperm on the planet, and many other plants, as well as many fish, reptile and salamander species - like Ambystoma platineum)
- symbiotic association, as seen in lichens and also in how mitochondria fused with bacteria into eukaryotes
- recombinational stabilization (a.k.a allohomoploid nothospeciation), where the slightly mismatched chromosomes from different DNA sets of compatible but different species pair up into complex heteroduplexes that end up fragmenting or fusing chromosome segments when the first generation of hybrids starts mating - which very well might be how two chimpanzee's chromosomes fused into our own bigger Chromosome 2.

In the cases mentioned of TFA some of the 'exotic' genes may be explained more simply as introgressions from a past hybridization event with a different species followed by backcrossing.

Comment It goes further still (Score 1) 118

There's more to it still: you can actually exploit the incertitude on the measurements you're using to categorize your subjects into subgroups, in a way to ensure your drug WILL report positive effects even if it has zero real effect. It's very well explained in this short article by Tom Naughton, complete with a numerical demonstration.

To put it shortly: you can design the subgroups' criterion in a way that overrepresents false positives and underrepresents the false-negatives that would otherwise counterbalance them.

Submission + - WalkCar Is A Portable Ride Just The Size Of A Laptop->

An anonymous reader writes: We don’t need Lexus Hoverboard teasers anymore, because we will have something similar to that soon enough. More like a mechanical skateboard, WalkCar is equally effective like a Hoverboard that you can step on to travel from one block to another. It’s about the size of a thick laptop, like the old IBMs but still, it’s portable enough to be carried around in a backpack or a briefcase.

Manufactured by an inventor in Japan, WalkCar looks like a more practical portable ride. It’s made of aluminum and works on lithium batteries.

Kuniako Saito, the developer of this device has done masters in electric car motor controls engineering. His motivation behind WalkCar was a device portable enough to be carried around in our bags.

The device is powerful enough to carry a person on a steep hill. It also has a tendency to navigate through tight courses. Apart from a lot of practice that you require to balance on a tiny surface, its only other drawback is the loud sound while working.

WalkCar is priced at $800 dollars, which is something really cheaper than a $10000 Hoverboard. It’s going to be available for the public in 2016. The developer is also going to start Kickstarter funding soon.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Drone drops drugs onto Ohio prison yard->

Okian Warrior writes: Officers rushed into the north yard of Mansfield Correctional Institution in Mansfield, Ohio, last week after noticing 75 inmates gathering and a fight breaking out.

It wasn't until authorities later reviewed surveillance tape that they saw what led to the fisticuffs: A drone had flown over the yard and delivered 144.5 grams of tobacco, 65.4 grams of marijuana and 6.6 grams of heroin before the fight ensued.

If the heroin is half pure, that package amounts to about 140 individual doses,

Link to Original Source

Submission + - How Boing Boing Handled an FBI Subpoena Over Its Tor Exit Node->

An anonymous reader writes: Cory Doctorow has posted an account of what happened when tech culture blog Boing Boing got a federal subpoena over the Tor exit node the site had been running for years. They received the subpoena in June, and the FBI demanded all logs relating to the exit node: specifically, "subscriber records" and "user information" for everybody associated with the exit node's IP address. They were also asked to testify before a federal grand jury. While they were nervous at first, the story has a happy ending. Their lawyer sent a note back to the FBI agent in charge, explaining that the IP address in question was an exit node. The agent actually looked into Tor, realized no logs were available, and cancelled the request. Doctorow considers this encouraging for anyone who's thinking about opening a new exit node" "I'm not saying that everyone who gets a federal subpoena for running a Tor exit node will have this outcome, but the only Tor legal stories that rise to the public's attention are the horrific ones. Here's a counterexample: Fed asks us for our records, we say we don't have any, fed goes away."
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Why Bill Gates Is Dumping Another $1 Billion Into Clean Energy->

An anonymous reader writes: A little over a month ago, Bill Gates made headlines when he decided to double down on his investments in renewable energy. Now, he's written an article for Quartz explaining why: "I think this issue is especially important because, of all the people who will be affected by climate change, those in poor countries will suffer the most. Higher temperatures and less-predictable weather would hurt poor farmers, most of whom live on the edge and can be devastated by a single bad crop. Food supplies could decline. Hunger and malnutrition could rise. It would be a terrible injustice to let climate change undo any of the past half-century’s progress against poverty and disease—and doubly unfair because the people who will be hurt the most are the ones doing the least to cause the problem." He also says government is not doing enough to fund such research, and that energy markets aren't doing a good enough job of factoring the negative effects of carbon emissions.
Link to Original Source
Privacy

Kentucky Man Arrested After Shooting Down Drone 1197

McGruber writes: Hillview, Kentucky resident William H. Merideth describes his weekend: "Sunday afternoon, the kids – my girls – were out on the back deck, and the neighbors were out in their yard. And they come in and said, 'Dad, there's a drone out here, flying over everybody's yard.'" Merideth's neighbors saw it too. "It was just hovering above our house and it stayed for a few moments and then she finally waved and it took off," said neighbor Kim VanMeter. Merideth grabbed his shotgun and waited to see if the drone crossed over his property. When it did, he took aim and shot it out of the sky.

The owners showed up shortly, and the police right after. He was arrested and charged with first degree criminal mischief and first degree wanton endangerment before being released the next day. Merideth says he will pursue legal action against the drone's owner: "He didn't just fly over. If he had been moving and just kept moving, that would have been one thing -- but when he come directly over our heads, and just hovered there, I felt like I had the right. You know, when you're in your own property, within a six-foot privacy fence, you have the expectation of privacy. We don't know if he was looking at the girls. We don't know if he was looking for something to steal. To me, it was the same as trespassing."

Comment Re:Small little feller (Score 1) 153

And I'm not surprised, considering how full of holes and lapses taxonomy is. It's pretty much a pseudoscience as it stands so far. We've been trying to put every critter into a single, discrete box called "species" and arranging those in ways that simply won't fit with the facts. Which order do protoctists really belong to ? Are euglenids plant or animal ? Are myxomycetes fungus or protoctists ? What about racoon dogs, cynogales, etc. ?

Phylogenetic "trees" should really be loose hypergraphs with lots and lots of cycles and a wide circumference.

!07/11 PDP a ni deppart m'I !pleH

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