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+ - Massachusetts SWAT teams claim they're private corporations, immune to oversight->

Submitted by thermowax
thermowax (179226) writes "Massachusetts SWAT teams claim they’re private corporations, immune from open records laws. Kind of amusing this is in arch-Liberal Mass, but enough editorializing: I don't even know where to start here. No FOIA demands, no investigations, or reviews... the police state gets more real on a daily basis."
Link to Original Source

+ - Jackson Palmer leaving Dogecoin

Submitted by pankkake
pankkake (877909) writes "Jackson Palmer, one of the founders of Dogecoin, announced he was leaving because the "movement" felt "cultlike", after being involved in a public argument over Dogecoin's trademark.

Not that people were not warned abundantly.

Dogecoin has been steadily losing value and it is anticipated that it will lose more. The author points that altcoins attract increasingly homogeneous groups, confirming Palmer's statements."

Comment: Re:And the stupidest thing about it? (Score 3, Interesting) 710

by Jesrad (#47313269) Attached to: Workaholism In America Is Hurting the Economy

you literally can't get more than 40 hours of work out of people anyway.

Try 20.

For most of our existence as a species, 18-24 hours of work per week has been the world-wide average time spent satisfying our basic needs. All the rest was leisure, endeavours in curiosity and socializing. This observation still verifies with the few primitive tribes still around. It also verifies in our records of ancestral agricultural tribes. That's the intensity of work our bodies have attuned to over hundreds of thousands of years of recent evolution.

From my professional experience too it verifies, and I'm curious about what other people may want to report about that. People around me may log long or short hours over the days but once you substract the pauses, all the staring at the screen in a blank mind right after lunch or at the end of the work day, all the heated discussions about this hot topic or that, all the trying to figure out or motivate yourself about what you should be doing next, and concentrate on the actual, value-adding focus and thinking and doing, that's hardly more than 3 to 5 hours a week-day, typically 1-3 hours around 10 in the morning and 2-3 hours around 3 P.M. Even middle management types who try to commit, who show up first and leave last everyday, spend most of their time socializing rather than actually organising things up (basically they're downrate, modernized tribes' chiefs).

If you've got a flexible enough mind, it's a lot more efficient for you (and healthier and easier and saner and...) to wake up without an alarm clock, and not rush to the office, help yourself with organising your tasks with basic methodology, then get stuff done in those 4-5 hours. And outside of those hours relax, talk with your colleagues, allow yourself to enjoy your lunch, etc. There's litterally no point trying to force it beyond that.

Also, you'll benefit immensely from cutting the crap out of your life at home too. Stop inflicting incessant news updates, FB status updates, tweets and 24/7 information TV on yourself, your brain is NOT built for that kind of abuse. Stop thinking in terms of pain/gain balance: an hour of treadmilling is not compensating a handful of cupcakes, not in any way you can measure utility for yourself, ever ; and similarly inflicting huge stress and deadlines and job abuse on yourself so you can then indulge in a more wasteful home and car and lifestyle is NOT balanced either.

That one most precious but limited resource that you have in a basically fixed amount for life: your time... stop throwing it away so liberally. You just need to spend half as much as your income (give or take a quarter of your income, there's quite a margin) and then you can get retired in your 30s (or 40s if you're already late in the game), even on a $40-50 000/year job.

Comment: Re:Socialism is not working (Score 2) 710

by Jesrad (#47313065) Attached to: Workaholism In America Is Hurting the Economy

I'm a french citizen and I don't know whether to laugh or cry at this whole debate. I wish anyone genuinely curious about this topic could live my situation for a couple years, just as I have gone and lived in other countries to see and learn. There is no way to get a useful view on this from a single vantage point.

Comment: Re:Oh yeah it's "workaholism" (Score 1) 710

by Jesrad (#47313059) Attached to: Workaholism In America Is Hurting the Economy

The only "businesses" that benefit from paltry economic growth and inadequation between the qualifications of the potential workforce on one side, and the qualificatio nrequirements of the installed industry on the other side, are the "businesses" that can compel you to "buy" their products, by law. Lots of unemployed, low-qualification adults mean an ample supply of cannon fodder for the army. Low economic growth mean low treasury bond interests which mean they get to print and spend all the money they need.

+ - Venture-backed Bitcoin miner startup can't deliver on time, gets sued->

Submitted by mpicpp
mpicpp (3454017) writes "Yet another Bitcoin miner manufacturer, CoinTerra, now faces legal action for not fulfilling an order when it originally promised to. CoinTerra is the third Bitcoin-related startup to face litigation for breach of contract and/or fraud in recent months.
The CoinTerra lawsuit was filed in late April 2014 by an Oakland, California-based man seeking to be the lead plaintiff in a proposed class-action lawsuit. Lautaro Cline, the suit alleges, purchased a TerraMiner IV in October 2013 for delivery by January 2014. The company promised, he claims, that this miner would operate at two terahashes per second and would consume 1,200 watts of power. It did neither.

However, Cline’s suit also claims that CoinTerra did not deliver the miner until February 2014, and it “operated well below the speed advertised and consumed significantly more power than CoinTerra represented, causing Plaintiff to suffer significant lost profits and opportunities.”"

Link to Original Source

+ - 'Vigilante motorist' faces fine after using mobile signal jammer to keep others ->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "An American driver is facing a $48,000 fine after using a mobile signal jammer in his car to block motorists around him from using their phones on the road.

Jason Humphreys reportedly used the jammer from the back seat of his Toyota Highlander for around two years before being caught by Florida police.

The 60-year-old said that he used the jammer – which transmits radio signals that interfere with mobile phones – because he was ‘fed up’ with watching others use their phones on the road."

Link to Original Source

+ - Xfce: Choice Desktop environment for new Linux Users-> 1

Submitted by MrBingoBoingo
MrBingoBoingo (3481277) writes "A lot has changed and continued to change in the world of Linux and Unix desktop environments. A stong case though can be made that Xfce is the best direction to point new desktop Linix and *nix users towards. With rapid change happening in the world of desktop environments, what direction is really the best to point aspiring Linux users towards?"
Link to Original Source

+ - Multi-node OpenStack RDO IceHouse on AWS/EC2 and Google->

Submitted by iamondemand
iamondemand (3658299) writes "OpenStack is awesome. But, in order to try out the latest releases you typically need more hardware and time.
Maybe you’ve always wanted to play with and never found the time? Or maybe you did install it, but you had to spend days scrounging for suitable hardware? Or maybe you’re an expert, but you have no way to quickly spin up and down entirely new installs?"

Link to Original Source

+ - North Dakota researchers evaluate use of UAS in crop and livestock production

Submitted by stephendavion
stephendavion (2872091) writes "Researchers at North Dakota State University (NDSU) are working with the university's Carrington Research Extension Center to evaluate the use of unmanned aircraft system (UAS) to monitor crop and livestock research projects. As part of the study, researchers are using UAS-mounted thermal, infrared sensors and cameras that capture images at specific frequencies to gather data from fields and livestock at specified times. NDSU Extension Service agricultural machine systems specialist and the project lead John Nowatzki said: "There is currently much interest in using UAS in agriculture."

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