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Comment: Re:There aren't infinite bugs (Score 1) 235

by omgwtfroflbbqwasd (#46788333) Attached to: Bug Bounties Don't Help If Bugs Never Run Out
Counterpoint: Even the best teams are not capable of making secure software.

Case in point, the NASA shuttle avionics system. CMMI level 5 certified software development program, track record of 2 Sev-1 defects per year during development.

Timeline Analysis and Lessons Learned (see page 7/slide 6) You'll find that there were hundreds of unknown latent Sev-1 defects (potentially causing loss of payload and human life) and even ~150 defects 15 years after the program started.

The question isn't whether your team is capable or willing to fix the issue, you must acknowledge that there is nearly 100% certainty that there are unknown vulnerabilities in any software you write. The question goes back to whether a bug bounty program will ever cross the inflection point of a ROI chart.

Comment: Re:Federal Judges Need to Go Back to School (Score 1) 584

by omgwtfroflbbqwasd (#41421141) Attached to: Federal Judge Says No Right To Secret Ballot, OKs Barcoded Ballots
The constitution simply defines the scope and authority of the federal government, and relationships between states as well as between state and federal government.. All powers not explicitly defined in the constitution as being federal are resigned to state jurisdiction. Constitutional amendments have added specific rights to address state and federal abuses.

Comment: No one has a "low priority" project (Score 5, Insightful) 304

The answer lies in quantifying the project impact, not in calling it low/medium/high (which is a subjective, relative term). Also, as business grows (or shrinks), the measurement of impact should be weighted as well. For example, a project that generates $1M/yr in revenue is a big deal when you're making $2M/yr, but not as much when you're making $20M/yr.

In the end, limited resources need to be focused on the area where it makes the most impact rather than trying to solve everyone's problems. That is exactly what IT management's job is.

The other answer is that no group/team/company does this really well, it comes down to individual manager's or IC's style and how you dismiss the trivial requests.

Comment: Re:It can be a blurry line (Score 1) 129

by omgwtfroflbbqwasd (#31604488) Attached to: Who Should Own Your Smartphone?

First things first. Is "company data" - email, contacts, files - accessible from your phone? If so, they have a vested interest in making sure that data is not compromised when your phone is lost or stolen. As a result, PIN/password requirements, encryption, antivirus, and remote wipe capabilities are generally required. In some cases where devices have a tunnel to the corporate network (Blackberry), they will possibly want to control what apps you install to prevent malicious ones from accessing the corporate network via your BES server.

Most laypeople don't have any clue about protecting company data on a regular basis, they just want their data instantly and aren't concerned with what happens in a worst-case scenario. "Oops, it got stolen. Guess I need to get the latest model now!"

Comment: Re:SFC Find It? (Score 2, Informative) 323

by omgwtfroflbbqwasd (#31115798) Attached to: Rootkit May Be Behind Windows Blue Screen
Generally, rootkits will modify function pointers in the kernel so that typical detection activities are trapped and handled so that the system appears unaltered. In the case of file access, the original file (in an alternate location, data stream, etc.) can be accessed in place of the trojaned one that was loaded on boot, thus preserving original the file size and contents.

Comment: Sysadmins have good growth opportunity (Score 5, Insightful) 141

by omgwtfroflbbqwasd (#30700178) Attached to: Managing Young Sys Admins At Oregon State Open Source Lab

While entry-level programmers may make a slightly higher salary than a similar systems administrator, over time there's a lot more upward opportunity for the sysadmin. Systems Engineering and Systems Architecture - being the guy that ties the network, the server, and the apps together, is a very in-demand skill and is something programmers will never have the opportunity to become. Programmers only make the big bucks when they have other specialized knowledge that's specific to the apps they are developing, i.e. finance, GIS, physics, etc..

I'm personally glad I made the decision 12 years ago to move into systems after earning my Comp. Sci. degree. I went from web app development for an ISP to Linux/Solaris/HPUX sysadmin, to Systems Architecure, to Info Security.

Security

Is China Creating the World's Largest Botnet Army? 195

Posted by timothy
from the economies-of-scale dept.
david_a_eaves writes "The Chinese government is mandating that all computers sold in China come with Internet blocking software. Rob Cottingham writes an excellent piece noting how the censorship application of this software should be the least of our concerns. This new software may create an opportunity for the Chinese Government to appropriate these computers and use them to create the worlds largest botnet army." Update: 06/11 21:26 GMT by T : J. Alex Halderman writes "My students and I have been examining the Green Dam censorware software. We've found serious vulnerabilities that can be exploited by any web site a user visits with the software installed. We also found that some of the blacklists seems to have been taken from the American-made filtering program CyberSitter. We've posted a report and demo."

May the bluebird of happiness twiddle your bits.

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