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AMD

AMD Publishes Open-Source "ATI Evergreen" Driver 159

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the still-watching-and-waiting dept.
Several readers have written to tell us that AMD has published their code to support the Radeon HD 5000 "Evergreen" graphics cards on Linux in an open-source driver. Unfortunately the driver isn't quite as complete as some might hope. The current offering doesn't promise 2D (EXA) acceleration or 3D support. "The DDX driver supports mode-setting on the Evergreen/R800 series GPUs with VGA and DVI connectors while the DisplayPort connectivity is still not working right, according to AMD's Alex Deucher who had written most of this code. These new AMD graphics cards have been around since September while there was no open-source support at that time. In December just before Christmas there was Evergreen Shader documentation that was made publicly available and around that time it was confirmed via our forums that initial VGA mode-setting was working with Evergreen internally on unreleased code. Since then the digital connector support has been added in and this code has finally cleared AMD's legal review. The revised target was to publish this code by FOSDEM, which is this weekend so AMD did hit the target this time."
Yahoo!

Ubuntu Moves To Yahoo For Default Firefox Search 370

Posted by kdawson
from the can-you-say-bing dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Starting in Ubuntu's Lucid Lynx release, Firefox's default search engine will be switched from Google to Yahoo. The switch was made after Canonical 'negotiated a revenue sharing deal with Yahoo.' Google will still be available as a choice. Since Yahoo search is now powered by Microsoft's Bing, this would seem to mean that Microsoft will be paying people for using Ubuntu."
Hardware Hacking

Misa Digital Guitar Runs On Linux 125

Posted by kdawson
from the far-too-many-degrees-of-freedom dept.
conner_bw writes "Imagine strumming a guitar without any strings, on a touchscreen. Think the idea is too far-fetched? The Misa digital guitar claims to be exactly this. Overcoming the natural limitations of a traditional guitar, this new instrument eliminates the need to pluck strings while using the right hand to control sound. Specs: Linux kernel 2.6.31 (Gentoo); 24 frets; touchscreen; MIDI out; RJ-45 Ethernet. My favourite parts of the site are the FAQ (How do you SSH into the guitar?), and this quote from the developer: 'Because the software is open source I'm hoping people completely change the instrument and share new "firmware" with others. Different graphics, different control ideas etc. It would all be free of charge. So I'm hoping that happens as the instrument becomes more familiar.'" The developer, Michael, has not yet promised a delivery date or set a price for the instruments he is manufacturing.
Businesses

Red Hat Support Continues To Flourish 215

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the focus-is-everything dept.
ruphus13 writes "As the pure-play Open Source companies continue to dwindle, Red Hat has thrived through the recession. Its support revenues have grown 20+%, and account for 75+% of its revenues. 'Instead of the traditional strategy of selling expensive proprietary software licenses, as practiced by the Microsofts and Oracles of the world, Red Hat gets the vast majority of its revenues from selling support contracts. In the third quarter of last year, support subscriptions accounted for $164 million of its $194 million in revenue, up 21 percent year-over-year. All 25 of the company's largest support subscribers renewed subscriptions, even despite a higher price tag.'"
GNU is Not Unix

Palm Sued Over Palm Pre GPL Violation 374

Posted by timothy
from the license-quicksand dept.
zaxl writes "Palm is being sued by Artifex Software over the PDF viewer in Palm's Pre smartphone, which may violate the GNU GPL. Artifex alleges that Palm has copied Artifex's PDF rendering engine, called muPDF, and integrated it into the Palm Pre's PDF viewer application without the proper licensing conditions. The entire application must be licensed under the GPL if muPDF is part of the application. It seems more and more cell phones are shipping with open source code, but in a closed manner."
Image

Wells Fargo Bank Sues Itself 445

Posted by samzenpus
from the so-crazy-it-just-might-work dept.
Extreme economic problems require extreme solutions, and Wells Fargo Bank has come up with a good one. They have decided to sue themselves. Wells Fargo holds the first and second mortgages on a condominium that is going into foreclosure. As holder of the first, they are suing all other lien holders, including the holder of the second, which is Wells Fargo. It gets better. The company has hired a lawyer to defend itself against its own lawsuit. The defense lawyer even filed this answer to the complaint, "Defendant admits that it is the owner and holder of a mortgage encumbering the subject real property. All other allegations of the complaint are denied." On the website The Consumer Warning Network, Angie Moreschi wrote: "We've apparently reached the perfect storm for complete and utter idiocy by some banks trying to foreclose on homes."

Comment: Re:This is great! (Score 1) 99

by ohnobinki (#28670891) Attached to: Unsung, Unpaid Coders Behind Federal IT Dashboard

You only speak for yourself. You certainly don't speak for me. In fact by trying to take authority for your point of view from your presumption that everyone else agrees with you, you're guaranteed to be wrong, and lose the point.

This is the whole point. Many tax dollars spent do not benefit each and every citizen. Just because the government wants to fund a certain religious (e.g., secularist) school does not mean that every citizen will support that school.

In fact, the government should not be involved in education at all. The post you replied to is recognizing that the government is taking too much money—and power—into its own hands. Most of the taxes and powers belong to the citizens. This is the reason the American Colonies of England separated from England—because the government tried to become too involved in the lives of a self-governing and self-disciplined people.

The most obvious reason that government shouldn't be too involved in the daily affairs of law-abiding citizens is that noone should be forced to accept the (many times) biased points of view of governing agencies.

Privacy

Social Security Numbers Can Be Guessed 268

Posted by timothy
from the oh-there's-a-scheme-all-right dept.
BotScout writes "The nation's Social Security numbering scheme has left millions of citizens vulnerable to privacy breaches, according to researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, who for the first time have used statistical techniques to predict Social Security numbers solely from an individual's date and location of birth. The researchers used the information they gleaned to predict, in one try, the first five digits of a person's Social Security number 44 percent of the time for 160,000 people born between 1989 and 2003. A Social Security Administration spokesman said the government has long cautioned the private sector against using a social security number as a personal identifier, even as it insists 'there is no fool-proof method for predicting a person's Social Security Number.'" Update: 07/07 00:01 GMT by T : Reader angrytuna links to Wired's coverage of the SSN deduction system, and links to the researchers' FAQ at Carnegie Mellon, which says that the research paper will be presented at BlackHat Las Vegas later this month.

Comment: Re:Static Dynamic IPs (Score 1) 527

by ohnobinki (#28292073) Attached to: Comcast Intercepts and Redirects Port 53 Traffic

Are you running that and hoping that your dynamic IP address doesn't change or do you have a business account with a fixed IP? If it's a business account than I would assume that they aren't redirecting those but could still be redirecting on consumer accounts.

Dynamic IPs are not ``dynamic'' if one nevers gives up the lease. I have WOW (wide open west / http://wowway.com/ ) Internet and the only time my IP has changed is when our router was replaced (giving it a different client ID) and, of course, when I directly plugged my computer into a hub connected to the modem (to give it direct Internet access). Because WOW has blocked all UDP traffic on port 53, I have a gracious friend who has ComCast and serves my DNS. Comcast doesn't seem to change IPs unless if the router/DHCP client releases a lease. This means I essentially don't need to change glue records at all. But Comcast has seemed to more often supposedly required people to re-plug-in their modems and (I'm guessing only from slight experience) Comcast may have even forced an IP change upon one router I've had access to.

Has any other WOW user tested serving DNS? I sent a query to WOW people and they said:

Port 53 is reserved for internal WOW! network use only. Please try using an alternate port.

Handhelds

T-Mobile To Launch Android Tablet 101

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the that's-one-big-ass-iphone dept.
nandemoari writes "T-Mobile is planning to use Google's open source operating system 'Android' on devices that blur the line between cellphone and home PC. In addition, Samsung says they will also produce Android phones, but need to work out the kinks first. Both announcements come shortly after HP revealed that it is investigating the idea of using Android to power some of its low-cost netbook computers in place of Windows."
Communications

Data Center Raid About Unpaid Telco Fees 174

Posted by timothy
from the that's-what-they-want-you-to-believe dept.
craig writes "CBS11 News reports that the raid on Core IP networks is in the result of an investigation into unpaid telco access fees paid by CLECs and VoIP carriers to terminate calls on their networks. They also report that this raid is linked to the March 12th raid on Crydon Technology's datacenter, which also hosted VOIP providers. Anyone in the telco business will tell you access fees to other carriers are a total mess and lots of carriers have unpaid balances out there. It gives you the feeling that the FBI is acting as a collection agency for AT&T and Verizon."
Windows

Windows 95 Almost Autodetected Floppy Disks 334

Posted by timothy
from the be-nearly-nostalgic dept.
bonch writes "Windows 95 almost shipped with a technique for detecting whether a floppy disk was inserted without spinning up the drive. Microsoft's floppy driver developer discovered a sequence of commands that detected a disk without spinup — unfortunately, unspecified behavior in the floppy hardware specification meant that half the drives worked one way and half the other, each giving opposite results for the detection routine. Microsoft considered a dialog prompting the user to insert a disk to 'train' the routine, but the idea was scrapped."
Censorship

Phoenix Police Seize PCs of a Blogger Critical of the Department 515

Posted by Soulskill
from the check-and-mate dept.
logicassasin sends in a story about a blogger in Phoenix, AZ, who runs a site that is critical of the local police department. The police recently raided his home and seized his computer hardware. "Jeff Pataky, who runs Bad Phoenix Cops, said the officers confiscated three computers, routers, modems, hard drives, memory cards and everything necessary to continue blogging. The 41-year-old software engineer said they also confiscated numerous personal files and documents relating to a pending lawsuit he has against the department alleging harassment — which he says makes it obvious the raid was an act of retaliation." A local publication quotes Pataky saying, "We have heard internally from our police sources that they purposefully did this to stop me... They took my cable modem and wireless router. Anyone worth their salt knows nothing is stored in the cable modem."
Patents

How Do I Put an Invention Into the Public Domain? 233

Posted by Soulskill
from the co2-powered-self-replicating-gravity-detector dept.
Nefarious Wheel writes "I have a couple of inventions — mechanical devices, based on physical principles — that I believe could transform certain aspects of industry. The trouble is, I can't afford to file patents, and even if I could, I'm not sure that would be the best way for these devices to be made available as widely as I'd like. Is there some way to publish the details of these innovations in the public domain in such a way as to protect them from being snaffled away by some patent troll? I'd be happy with a contribution (or simple attribution) model for recompense, which could be zero to whatever, but that's not as important to me as getting the ideas out there for anyone who wants to use them. This isn't copyright, and I know of no patent equivalent to Creative Commons. In short, what's the best way to protect an invention against someone filing a patent on it, short of patenting the device yourself? Can this be done?"
Intel

High Performance Linux Kernel Project — LinuxDNA 173

Posted by timothy
from the squeezing-out-performance dept.
Thaidog submits word of a high-performance Linux kernel project called "LinuxDNA," writing "I am heading up a project to get a current kernel version to compile with the Intel ICC compiler and we have finally had success in creating a kernel! All the instructions to compile the kernel are there (geared towards Gentoo, but obviously it can work on any Linux) and it is relatively easy for anyone with the skills to compile a kernel to get it working. We see this as a great project for high performance clusters, gaming and scientific computing. The hopes are to maintain a kernel source along side the current kernel ... the mirror has 2.6.22 on it currently, because there are a few changes after .22 that make compiling a little harder for the average Joe (but not impossible). Here is our first story in Linux Journal."

This is the theory that Jack built. This is the flaw that lay in the theory that Jack built. This is the palpable verbal haze that hid the flaw that lay in...

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