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Comment Put it in the library (Score 1, Interesting) 121

NO language needs a garbage collector, though an option to use one selectively would be nice.

Let's split the difference and say a language needs a garbage collector in its standard library that a programmer can choose to enable. C++ calls its reference-counting garbage collector std::shared_ptr.

Comment Even if the sky is falling down (Score 1) 102

well... when the sky falls, then chickenlittle should worry

In this model, I've spotted the pieces of camouflage that the aliens are assembling.

my sources in the security community get those new adserver names as the pop up easily too.

Not if they're like a328bc97.someadnetwork.example. Even eight hex digits would require four billion lines in a hosts file.

Comment Re:Wrong way around (Score 1) 704

Better explanation:

sysvinit is widely considered awful by most distro maintainers.

How do we know this? Well, because distro maintainers have been trying to get away from it for years. Even when everything was run from 'init' there have been multiple refactorings of /etc/*.d to try to produce a better start up environment.

At some point, some distributions, notably Ubuntu, switched to an initd replacement called Upstart. Because they were desperate to get away from sysvinit. ChromeOS, possibly the most widely used Desktop GNU/Linux distribution, was also an early adopter of Upstart. Again because it was considered better - more reliable, faster, etc - than horrible old init.

So why are they switching to systemd? Because systemd is considered better than Upstart (which in turn is considered better than sysvinit.) systemd has a better process model, and doesn't ignore required functionality (yes, the same program that configures devices at start up probably should configure USB devices that are plugged in dynamically, and the same processes that configure the network based upon what devices are plugged in at start up should probably configure the network based upon what devices become available later, etc. So yes, this supposed "monolithic" approach is basic common sense.)

Most of those complaining about systemd are actually fighting an argument they lost in 2006, when Upstart became part of Ubuntu 6.10. They've lost it not just in the GNU/Linux world, but also in, say, the Mac OS X world, where sysvinit was unceremoniously ejected back in 2005. Or the Solaris world. etc.

You know, I could understand this if we were actually losing anything by switching to systemd. The desire to remove X11 from *ix, for example, replacing it with a dumb graphics engine with a fraction of the functionality, I think is genuinely a tragedy. We'll lose much of what made *ix what it is if and when Wayland is adopted. But systemd doesn't remove anything. It's fast, efficient, and it fixes huge holes in GNU/Linux, problems we've been aware of since the mid-nineties but haven't had the spine to fix.

It's something to be welcomed.

Comment Re:W.C. Fields Does Politics (Score 1) 8

What could they possibly reveal about Trump that is worse than what everyone already knows about him? He's widely known to be Mafia connected, and he's made statements at Republican primary TV debates about bribing politicians.

(And add to that the fact that any "scandal" is likely to be another thing the establishment cares about and nobody else does.)

I doubt, at this point, even dead girl/live boy would do it.

Comment Re:When to stop? (Score 1) 355

I slowly started to install some Ubuntu (for ease of use) on my parents' computers, and that fits most of the requirements they have: internet, flash games, video, music.

After you have defenestrated a PC in this manner, how do you handle it when someone asks for help getting suspend to work again? "I closed the lid and opened it again, and now it's stuck on a black screen."

Comment Screen peeking (Score 1) 224

That's right, we watch them ... TV, movies, maybe video games.

I don't want my big TV replaced with anything which is "cleverly redistributed to smaller screens".

So do you want to make it that much easier to give away your position in a first-person shooter to your screen-peeking competitors?

Comment HDMI switch (Score 2) 224

Paradoxically, if you want a reasonable number of HDMI ports (so you can attach your own devices) you have to get a smart TV.

Or a dumb TV and an external HDMI switch. You need an external switch anyway if you have a lot of legacy devices with composite, S-Video, or component outputs, such as retro video game consoles or a VHS player for those movies that haven't yet been rereleased on Blu-ray.

Comment Re:Streaming video (Score 1) 224

The mouse and keyboard are far superior as controls [to what is available for a console]

I wouldn't be so sure. Though a lot of PS3 and PS4 games support a USB mouse and keyboard, an analog joystick offers finer control of movement speed and direction than WASD, which are equivalent to the 8-way directional pad that's been around since the NES. And what do players 2 through 4 use, especially in games where sharing doesn't mean splitting?

and the processor speed and graphics are superior to any console.

But at what cost? Say you want to build a gaming PC so that it can be used in the living room while someone else in the household is using the PC at the computer desk. Can you build a PS4-equivalent second PC for $400?

But one thing I'll grant to PC gaming is mods.

Comment Even if you really don't care about the Super Bowl (Score 2) 224

Antenna TV really only works if you really really REALLY don't care about the crap you're watching.

There are plenty of people in Slashdot's home country who care about the national championships of the country's major professional sport leagues: the Super Bowl, the NBA Finals, and the World [sic] Series.

6 Curses = 1 Hexahex