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Comment: Citalopram (Score 5, Interesting) 121 121

I'm seeing a lot of negative postings about unnecessary drugs and implying doctor's don't know what they're doing. I went through an episode about a year ago where if I tried to sleep my face would start burning. If I got up, it would fade away. I suffered on roughly one hour's sleep per night for a year before I went to see a doctor. The solution was to take one pill per day, and in a few weeks I was sleeping full nights again. It took years to recover though, because that level of extended sleep deprivation is very damaging. Even now, I'm still not quite as sharp as I was before.

When I look back I can see how stupid I was. I suffered that entire year, and had years of recovery, for nothing. Why? Because people who don't have a hot clue about psychology said that the doctors don't know what they're doing, the medicine is as bad as the disease, those pills are over-prescribed, etc. etc. But guess what? If your meds turn out to have bad side effects you can stop taking them, or just ask for different ones. Such a simple thing. And yet so many people who could benefit from them are turned away by fear, uncertainty and doubt.

+ - Teachers granted power to 'confiscate and destroy' unhealthy lunch->

schwit1 writes: The British government is urging school leaders to use their "common law powers" to search student lunches and potentially confiscate any items they deem "unhealthy or inappropriate."

Education minister Lord Nash tells Express, "Schools have common law powers to search pupils, with their consent, for items." There is nothing to prevent schools from having a policy of inspecting lunch boxes for food items that are prohibited under their school food policies.

"A member of staff may confiscate, keep or destroy such items found as a result of the search if it is reasonable to do so in the circumstances." The government's foray into lunch inspections began when Cherry Tree Primary School in Colchester banned a Peperami sausage snack and scotch eggs from a six-year-old girl's lunch. Manchester's Manley Park Primary School seized cereal bars from lunches, according to the Huffington Post.

Link to Original Source

+ - Knowing C++ Beyond a Beginner Level ->

Nerval's Lobster writes: C++ is not an easy language to master, but many people are able to work in it just fine without being a 'guru' or anything along those lines. That being said, what separates C++ beginners from those with 'intermediate' skills, or even masters? According to this Dice article, it comes down to knowledge of several things, including copy constructors, virtual functions, how to handle memory leaks, the intricacies of casting, Lambda functions for C++11, (safe) exception handling and much more. All that being said, is there one particular thing or point that separates learners from masters?
Link to Original Source

+ - US, UK Intel agencies worked to subvert antivirus tools to aid hacking->

An anonymous reader writes: Documents from the National Security Agency and the United Kingdom's Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) obtained by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden reveal that the two agencies—and GCHQ in particular—targeted antivirus software developers in an attempt to subvert their tools to assure success in computer network exploitation attacks on intelligence targets. Chief among their targets was Kaspersky Labs, the Russian antivirus software company, according to a report by The Intercept's Andrew Fishman and First Look Media Director of Security Morgan Marquis-Boire.
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Interesting person (Score 5, Insightful) 284 284

Now that I've actually RTFA, as other people are saying he's a schizophrenic. Pretty cool operating system though, except for this:

TempleOS does not use memory protection. All code in the system runs at ring 0, the highest privilege level, meaning that a stray pointer write could easily crash the entire system.
...
He argues that Linux is designed for a use case that most people don’t have. Linux, he says, aims to be a 1970s mainframe, with 100 users connected at once. If a crash in one users’ programs could take down all the others, then obviously that would be bad. But for a personal computer, with just one user, this makes no sense. Instead the OS should empower the single user and not get in their way.

This only makes sense if you're running one program at a time. But if you're running 20 or more programs at once, like a regular user, then a bug in any one of them can cause weird behavior in the others, and it's almost impossible to debug or fix.

+ - Sourceforge Staff Hijacks Gimp for Windows Account, Injects Adware->

ourlovecanlastforeve writes: SourceForge, the code repository site owned by Slashdot Media, has apparently seized control of the account hosting GIMP for Windows on the service, according to e-mails and discussions amongst members of the GIMP community—locking out GIMP's lead Windows developer. And now anyone downloading the Windows version of the open source image editing tool from SourceForge gets the software wrapped in an installer replete with advertisements.
Link to Original Source

+ - SourceForge (owned by Slashdot Media) installs ads with GIMP-> 5 5

careysb writes: SourceForge, the code repository site owned by Slashdot Media, has apparently seized control of the account hosting GIMP for Windows on the service, according to e-mails and discussions amongst members of the GIMP community—locking out GIMP's lead Windows developer. And now anyone downloading the Windows version of the open source image editing tool from SourceForge gets the software wrapped in an installer replete with advertisements.
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Advanced is good enough (Score 1) 220 220

I expect most of the "Experts" are people who have been doing it long enough to think they know everything but not long enough to realize that they don't know everything.

I'm surprised that people are putting such a high bar for being an 'expert'. Personally, I consider someone who can program in any language at an expert level to be, well, an expert programmer. I don't feel it means you must know virtually everything there is to know about programming in all languages.

In my teens, I came up with the definition I privately use: An expert programmer is someone who can read and write very complicated pieces of code. A master programmer is someone who can solve the same problems using simple code that almost anyone can understand.

Most public domain software is free, at least at first glance.

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