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Comment Re:Book misses major points (Score 0) 111

I don't think she sufficiently covered the HOW which is the problem.

They don't fund a charter school and see how the students there do.

They fund political campaigns to move money FROM the existing system TO their system.

When their system does not support their projections, they leave it. BUT THEY DO NOT PAY TO HAVE THE LAW REVERSED.

So the end result is a worse public school system.

Comment Re: he should know better (Score 1) 288

The First Amendment to the ...


It is sad and sickening to see so called liberals ...

Also correct.

BUT ... it does not matter. In the end it is up to the business whether it will run X or not.

By way of example: if I paid you $10 to put a sign on your lawn saying X would it be wrong for you to refuse to put a sign saying Y on your lawn for $10?

And that's where we are at with this. The theatres refuse all religious / political ads. That way they do not endorse X or Y. Nor can they be seen as supporting Y.

Comment Re:Holy crap ... (Score 1) 67

The security difference between chip-and-signature and chip-and-PIN matters in only one case, and that is if your physical card is stolen from your wallet. Skimmers, data breaches, shoulder-surfing, all the hacking attacks won't yield the secret key inside the chip, preventing it from being counterfeited. If you don't like the security of your chip-and-signature card because you're afraid your card might be stolen, ask your bank to issue you a chip-and-PIN card instead. If your bank won't, there are plenty of other banks who will, and who will be grateful for your business.

Visa and the retailers originally figured U.S. customers would prefer chip-and-signature because it makes selling things "easy". But that's a pretty stupid attitude, because lots of people (including you and me) are wary about identity theft. Customers need to complain to their banks so that they learn we'd rather have PINs than signatures.

Overall credit card security will still remain terrible for a long time to come because static mag stripes still exist, and online card-not-present transactions still use static authentication data like CVV2 codes. What really needs to happen to actually improve security is that mag stripes and static numbers like CVV2 need to be flat-out outlawed. The recent "liability shift" is the opening salvo in the conversion, but we're probably still a decade away from actual security.

Comment Re:exaggerate much (Score 5, Insightful) 239

thats veeery generous of them.

oh wait, 99% of countries they offer it in already have consumer laws that dictate that the shops that sell the stuff have to accept used electronics and dispose of them properly(and as apple is doing direct sales, this puts them on the hook). who wants the hassle of going to the place to dispose of them though... not surprised of apple branding legal requirements as 'bonus' though!

the problem is more along the lines of apple not providing parts for fixing(3rd party pretty much) and their move to non-fixable at all on purpose devices. now this wouldn't suck so much if for example your ipod classic 160gb broke it's headphone jack(like all of them do, eventually).. since uh, what are you going to replace it with? a 16gb ipod touch?

thats the real problem, you find a device you like and you can't keep it running and you can't buy a replacement.

Comment Re:What 'meaning'? (Score 1) 137

How did these clowns get everyone acting like trained fucking monkeys?

Because, for the most part, they are.

I don't think that it is about the "stuff" in general. It's about the social status of being someone who has the "stuff". The more in-demand the stuff is this season, the more social status afforded to acquiring it. Even if that status is only temporary.

Vendors want to see a repeat of customers fighting for their products. Whether it be an Elmo doll or a Cabbage Patch Kid or whatever. Be cool. Be the person with the stuff. Everyone who did not get the stuff will be so envious.

Comment Re:Works for me (Score 1) 137

Manufacturers have long made custom versions of products for specific store chains, and not just TV sets. Pots and pans, clothing, furniture, most products are available to any store that's willing to pay for them. Some stores (like Walmart) have a specific price point, so the manufacturers produce a model without the chrome-plated knobs, the low contrast screens, and use only the cheapest cloned capacitors and dubious quality power supplies.

There's a lot of marketing power in it, too. Not only do they get to offer big TVs for ridiculously low prices, it's also safe to tout benefits like a "150% price match guarantee", when they have the exclusive contract to sell that exact model.

Comment Re:What's Unusual? (Score 1) 93

This new piece of malware shows sophistication of design, but that's not unheard of. Older malware was often customized by compile time switches and definitions; this just abstracts some of that away.

Many people (i.e. journalists and managers) think of malware authors as pimple-faced script kiddies hacking in their mothers' basements. They think that large, well-designed projects require teams of skilled developers who would only do so for a fat paycheck.

What's happened now is that vulnerabilities are so profitable that the threat landscape is no longer the exclusive domain of the single hacker - criminal gangs want a piece of it. They can afford to pay team salaries to engineer a solution.

And malware authors have learned to avoid the biggest risks of getting caught. In the old days a virus writer would also be the distributor. Modern authors get paid by selling their exploit code, along with customization and support contracts, to gangs of attackers. The attackers take on the risks, the developers collect fat checks. In some cases of vertical attacks (ATM skimmers for example), the "owner" of the malware uses cryptography to encrypt the skimmed data, preventing the low-level attackers from profiting from the stolen data. The profits go to the top first, and the paychecks cascade down (assuming honor among thieves.)

So what's newsworthy here is that they believe this malware to be further evidence of a new breed of well organized criminal software developers.

Comment Re:Speaking of crappy ads (paid posts) (Score 1) 219

slashdot probably doesnt know either.
they dont know what ads get displayed where.

which is why people use adblockers. for example, every now and then the mobile version of slashdot has ads that auto-open hoax update pages to install crap. I think it's because slashdot doesnt check what their page looks from different countries.

Comment Re:Look at the bean counters for your answer (Score 3, Insightful) 169

I have to explain that to people all the time.

To an employee, you are a paycheck / insurance / vacation-time / etc. If they fuck up they have to go through the interview process to replace those items. And it is in their best interest to do the job correctly so they don't have to deal with the problems or the hassle of interviewing.

To a contractor, you are billable hours. If they fuck up they have to find replacement billable hours. That's it. They don't care whether it works right because they can charge to fix it. Again. And again. If they find a customer who pays better, you'll be on your own. Unless you want to cough up more money.

No problem is so formidable that you can't just walk away from it. -- C. Schulz