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Comment: Strawman (Score 1) 46

by SAN1701 (#48244571) Attached to: Book Review: Measuring and Managing Information Risk: a FAIR Approach
"While stressing over Ebola, the media is oblivious to true public health threats like obesity, heart disease, drunk driving, diabetes, and the like."

No, it's not. Actually, no matter how much the media repeat warnings about these issues, PEOPLE (a part of them) is oblivious to these public health issues. I dare you to watch CNN or read MSN, HuffPo or any news aggregator a day without something being said about at least one of these issues, mostly (in US) obesity. We even had a mayor on NYC that went into a series of highly controversial steps to prevent obesity (limiting size of sodas, really? Coach potatoes would buy 2 of them). it's just that some people doesn't pay attention because they don't want to change their lifestyle.

Ebola is something "new", so gets more flash from news outlets since people will cringe for, well, news. It's the way people work, unfortunately. In a BTVS season, the much bigger issues above would be the Big Bad. Ebola is just the monster of the week. Granted, it gets full attention now, but once current crisis is gone, I doubt you'll hear about it until another outbreak.
Education

Solving the Mystery of Declining Female CS Enrollment 608

Posted by samzenpus
from the CS-needs-women dept.
theodp writes After an NPR podcast fingered the marketing of computers to boys as the culprit behind the declining percentages of women in undergraduate CS curricula since 1984 (a theory seconded by Smithsonian mag), some are concluding that NPR got the wrong guy. Calling 'When Women Stopped Coding' quite engaging, but long on Political Correctness and short on real evidence, UC Davis CS Prof Norm Matloff concedes a sexist element, but largely ascribes the gender lopsidedness to economics. "That women are more practical than men, and that the well-publicized drastic swings in the CS labor market are offputting to women more than men," writes Matloff, and "was confirmed by a 2008 survey in the Communications of the ACM" (related charts of U.S. unemployment rates and Federal R&D spending in the '80s). Looking at the raw numbers of female CS grads instead of percentages, suggests there wasn't a sudden and unexpected disappearance of a generation of women coders, but rather a dilution in their percentages as women's growth in undergrad CS ranks was far outpaced by men, including a boom around the time of the dot-com boom/bust.

Comment: Static initialization order problem. (Score 1) 427

by morto (#47676745) Attached to: Interviews: Ask Bjarne Stroustrup About Programming and C++
Hi Mr. Stroustrup, Thank you for C++. It is my language of choice.

Why the static initialization order problem was not addressed in recent reforms of the language ?

It does not seem very hard to fix. Although I am aware of the workarounds I do not like them. In my opinion we need to fix what is broken before adding more features. Thank you for your attention, Mauricio Gomes.

The Internet

Whatever Happened To the IPv4 Address Crisis? 574

Posted by samzenpus
from the still-working dept.
alphadogg writes "In February 2011, the global Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) allocated the last blocks of IPv4 address space to the five regional Internet registries. At the time, experts warned that within months all available IPv4 addresses in the world would be distributed to ISPs. Soon after that, unless everyone upgraded to IPv6, the world would be facing a crisis that would hamper Internet connectivity for everyone. That crisis would be exacerbated by the skyrocketing demand for IP addresses due to a variety of factors: the Internet of Things (refrigerators needing their own IP address); wearables (watches and glasses demanding connectivity); BYOD (the explosion of mobile devices allowed to connect to the corporate network); and the increase in smartphone use in developing countries. So, here we are three years later and the American Registry for Internet Numbers is still doling out IPv4 addresses in the United States and Canada. Whatever happened to the IPv4 address crisis?"

+ - The Strong Goldbach Conjecture Proved ?->

Submitted by morto
morto (525092) writes ""The Strong Goldbach conjecture dates back to 1742. It states that every even integer greater than four can be written as the sum of two prime numbers. Since then, no one has been able to prove the conjecture. ...Additionally, the conjecture has been verified to be true for all even integers up to 4.10^18. In this paper, we prove that the conjecture is true for all even integers greater than 362."

It seems then it is finally proved, right ?"

Link to Original Source
Mars

Mars One Has 78,000 Applicants 355

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the send-me-to-space dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Mars One reports that 78,000 people have volunteered for a one-way ticket to Mars. A quick calculation shows that this means people lined up coast-to-coast in a line with only 40cm per person! (As Robert Zubrin already predicted). If you want, you can still go and sign up (or sign up your worst enemy). Or you can just look at some videos of the would-be travelers."
Earth

How To Safeguard Loose Nukes 167

Posted by samzenpus
from the in-the-wrong-hands dept.
Lasrick writes "The Bulletin has an interesting article about the likelihood of terrorists obtaining nuclear material. 'Since 1993, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has logged roughly 2,000 cases of illicit or unauthorized trafficking of nuclear and radioactive material. Thirty illicit radioactive trafficking incidents were reported in the former Soviet region alone from 2009 to 2011. As Obama said in December, "Make no mistake, if [terrorists] get [nuclear material], they will use it."'"
Bug

Japanese Probe Finds Miswiring of Boeing 787 Battery 201

Posted by samzenpus
from the who's-to-blame dept.
NeverVotedBush writes in with the latest installment of the Dreamliner: Boeing 787 saga. "A probe into the overheating of a lithium ion battery in an All Nippon Airways Boeing 787 that made an emergency landing found it was improperly wired, Japan's Transport Ministry said Wednesday. The Transport Safety Board said in a report that the battery for the aircraft's auxiliary power unit was incorrectly connected to the main battery that overheated, although a protective valve would have prevented power from the auxiliary unit from causing damage. Flickering of the plane's tail and wing lights after it landed and the fact the main battery was switched off led the investigators to conclude there was an abnormal current traveling from the auxiliary power unit due to miswiring."

Comment: We do not know enough. (Score 1) 421

by morto (#42950831) Attached to: Does the Higgs Boson Reveal Our Universe's Doomsday?
In addition to the fact that precise numbers needed by the calculation are not available yet we do not know A LOT about the physical reality of the universe. A huge part of it we attribute to dark energy that is basically stuff we have no idea about. Not to mention the possibility of all of this be a simulation which would bring the possibility of changing the parameters of it.

MSDOS is not dead, it just smells that way. -- Henry Spencer

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