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Comment Re:Lots of GMTO Articles (Score 1) 67

Here's a list of the largest telescopes in space and on the ground:

http://phys.org/news/2015-01-b...

The diagram is probably the most informative part of the document:

http://cdn.phys.org/newman/csz...

Imagine if both Europe and the USA could build two large telescopes that could be combined together to form a stereoscopic telescope the size of the planet...

Comment Re:The way to fight this (Score 2) 375

Sure you can block one IP address at a time. Then they'll switch to a range of IP addresses, then funnel *everything* through a single IP address with a proxy server. I got fed up of constantly seeing IP traffic sent out, so tried blocking things. I'm using Privacy Badger:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

Safe Browsing also stores a mandatory preferences cookie on the computer which the US National Security Agency allegedly uses to identify individual computers for purposes of exploitation.

https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/...

"Add-ons Blocklist: Firefox contacts Mozilla once per day to check for add-on information to check for malicious add-ons. This includes, for example: browser version, OS and version, locale, total number of requests, time of last request, time of day, IP address, and the list of add-ons you have installed. You can turn off metadata updates at any time, but it may leave you open to security vulnerabilities."

"To help display relevant snippets, Firefox sends Mozilla a monthly request to look up your location at a country level using your IP address. We then send that country level information back to Firefox, where it's stored locally. Firefox will then choose snippets to show you based on the locally stored country information."

Comment Re:Surprised? (Score 1) 375

My parents used to have an aol.com dialup account, but they were forced to spend more and switch over to ADSL when AOL stopped providing dial-up modem pools. Still kept the old email account. With an old PC, their routine used to be; switch on PC, go into the kitchen, put the kettle on, put the toaster on, wait for the kettle to boil, wait for the toast to be ready, make some coffee, make the toast, have breakfast, go back to the PC, wait for the login screen to appear, dial into AOL, wait for a modem to be free, feed the cats, feed the dog, wait for the email to download, read email, send reply, do stuff for the rest of the day.

Comment Re:Essentially a dupe from 3 months ago (Score 1) 121

The Atari 800 used to have 9 pin sockets for the game controllers. These matched RS232 connectors. We replaced the cheap plastic moulded connectors with metal RS232 connectors. Only downside was that touching the metal case against the lower pins of the socket would reset the machine.

That mistake was duplicated with the desktop PC where the EGA connector was also 9 pin. You could end up plugging a monitor into the RS232 port.

Then there's SCART, where the cable was attached to the socket diagonally, constantly putting pressure that would pull the socket out.

Comment Re:Trend towards illegibility (Score 1) 141

I feel the same with trying to find a good font for editing source code. I like the zero's with the dot in the middle (Andale Mono), the dashes/minus signs should stretch all the way across (Courier New) and just about join up, not some 50/50 dashed line (Andale mono). The characters should fill most of the space in glyph box. Some fonts are just too square (Unispace), others are just too thin (TW-Sung), too small (TlwgMono Bold), too narrow (TakaoMincho). What looks good in the font selection window, looks awful in a command line (eg. Monospace 12)

Perhaps the font file options need to be more configurable - allow the user to select vertical/horizontal scaling and distances between characters rather than just like it/lump it with a particular font.

Comment Re:Intel's trolling us (Score 1) 291

I was watching some videos on parallel processing. One quote that I remember was that "cores are the transistors of today". Four decades ago, a CPU like a 6502 would have 3510 transistors and was the cheapest on the market, pulling down prices on all the other competitors. A high-end GPU board like an Nvidia Titan will have 2880+ cores. Going by transistors sizes alone, an entire GPU core will fit inside the space of a single 6502 logic gate. It's going to be easier to add more cores as chip sizes get smaller than it is to up the clock speed.

Intel could afford to crank up the juice to get better performance, because their CPU's were always tethered to the mains power supply. Floating-point performance was where their mojo came from. First they managed to get a floating-point unit integrated with the CPU (80486), then they added SIMD instructions (SSE, AVX) and invented massive cooling systems (water cooling with double fans and a radiator grill).

Comment Re:Perhaps Not Simple but ? (Score 1) 255

turkeyfish is suggesting that the TCP/IP sockets layer attempts to cache all the data being sent. Unfortunately, this isn't going to work because the reason the application stalls is because the TCP/IP layer is attempting to request a DHCP address from the network (which isn't going to happen), look up the address of a particular hostname (which isn't going to happen either), then stalling again when it tries to open a synchronised two-way connection with the desired host (which isn't going to happen as well).

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