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Comment: Re:The real questions to ask (Score 1) 209

Never trust an in-store rep to do ANYTHING. They will say one thing and when the plan is changed they can't get it back.

If you're going to upgrade, you upgrade at full price, and you do it from the website where you can verify yourself that the plan is still the same.

Comment: Re:This device is not new or interesting (Score 1) 651

by MBGMorden (#48046307) Attached to: The $1,200 DIY Gunsmithing Machine

Way back when each individual part was serialized (and for such guns an "all matching" gun is indeed worth a premium), but these days its just not efficient. Plus we've come a long ways in parts interchangeability. 100 years ago if you bought a part for a gun it needed to be fitted to that gun to work (and that is still true today for many "old" designs from that era, such as the 1911 handgun). On most newly designed guns parts just drop in and work. Being able to match it to a certain gun just isn't important.

Comment: Re:Sheriffs Dept preferred Mini-14 ... (Score 1) 651

by MBGMorden (#48040963) Attached to: The $1,200 DIY Gunsmithing Machine

What the range master at the Sheriffs training facility explained to me is that the Mini-14 offers the exact same performance as the semi-auto M16/M-4/AR-15 type rifles at a fraction of the price.

That may have once been true (about the price), but not really anymore. The Mini-14 starts at around $750. You can get AR-15's for under $600 now.

A big reason for that is simply market competition - the AR-15 patents have long expired and it's popularity has led to be it being one of the most heavily cloned rifles in the world, so all sorts of companies are making them (its to rifles what the 1911 is to handguns).

It also presents a problem for the anti-gun folks trying to present the gun as some niche purchase for whackos - its by far the most popularly sold model of rifle in the country.

Comment: Re:the solution: (Score 1) 651

by MBGMorden (#48040459) Attached to: The $1,200 DIY Gunsmithing Machine

In times past, yes. Nowadays however gun-rights activists indeed are heavily recruiting minorities to try and appeal to them. The NRA brought on Colion Noir (a black gun owner/vlogger) as a spokesperson, and they were very quick to jump to Shaneen Allen's defense when she (a black woman) was arrested in New Jersey for accidentally violating one of their draconian gun laws.

Simply put - trying to paint the NRA or gun rights activists as racist is a trick that simply doesn't work anymore. 40-50 years ago it was true, but back then half the country was racist. The whole country - including the gun rights movement - has come a long way.

Comment: Re:the solution: (Score 1) 651

by MBGMorden (#48040345) Attached to: The $1,200 DIY Gunsmithing Machine

The Constitution was written almost immediately after citizens had overthrown their previous government (England) via armed revolt. Many times England had tried to disarm to Colonists to prevent just such a thing from happening.

Do you honestly think its "nonsense" to think that a group that had just overthrown their government would not think it possible (and in the right circumstances necessary) to do so again?

Comment: Re:Why not KDE (Score 2, Insightful) 403

by MBGMorden (#47980463) Attached to: Debian Switching Back To GNOME As the Default Desktop

I've been using Linux since 1997 (pretty much exclusively since 2009). I still prefer MInt over anything else. Eye candy is good, package management is good - and it is the primary platform for Cinnamon which removes all the retarded aspects of Gnome 3 to make it back into a decent desktop UI.

Comment: Re:Not worth it (Score 2) 251

by MBGMorden (#47757007) Attached to: New Windows Coming In Late September -- But Which One?

For the most part. Crapware isn't really like Malware you get from the red-light districts of the web. Most of it is just junk installed by the OEM that goes away when uninstalled.

That's not to say it might to leave a config file or registry entry lying around afterwards, but as far as visible, executing processes, most of them respond well to just uninstalling.

Comment: Re:Already? (Score 1) 251

by MBGMorden (#47756979) Attached to: New Windows Coming In Late September -- But Which One?

Yeah - $30 or 40 may be a bit more reasonable. Still though, computers have gotten pretty cheap these days. I paid $199 for my Windows 8.1 laptop on sale. $30-40 is still a decent chunk of the purchase price to upgrade the OS (which I'm sure when the computer was assembled the OEM was charged next to nothing for the original copy).

Comment: Re:Why (Score 2) 251

by MBGMorden (#47756853) Attached to: New Windows Coming In Late September -- But Which One?

Because "web only" is what Google is about. It works pretty well for them honestly. Android phones and Chromebooks are selling pretty darned well.

For the most part that's what people seem to want these days. Even for the "keyboard, mouse and screen" form factor you'll likely see a shift to those type of devices. As said Chromebooks are already selling very well, but they're also introducing Chrome "desktops" - basically a chromebook that connects to external peripherals (ie, the Acer Chromebox CXI).

In less than 10 years a full computer running local apps won't be commonplace for "regular people" anymore. You'll likely see them relegated to use by content creators, programmers, and hobbyists like us.

It's kind of odd that Linux might finally succeed as the dominate desktop OS eventually - because eventually a desktop OS might not really be a viable retail product anymore.

Comment: Re:Already? (Score 1) 251

by MBGMorden (#47756787) Attached to: New Windows Coming In Late September -- But Which One?

I'm still wondering if the upgrade will be free for Windows 8 users or if they'll expect us to dish out another $100 to upgrade.

Don't get me wrong - WIndows 8.x has some nice features. I'm primarily a Linux user at home and only keep Windows 8 on my laptop (I use it for doing Visual Studio projects). The integration with Microsoft's cloud services is done pretty good.

HOWEVER, the UI is just insane (and I'm judging mostly from the "semi-fixed" 8.1 version - I never bothered with the original Windows 8). Metro is just not intuitive or useful. To make matters worse, system configuration seems to be split about 50/50 between Control Panel and the metro-based "PC Settings" screen (plus the registry in the background for other stuff you can't access from either of them).

It honestly feels like two dissimilar systems that they tried to rubber-band together, with the NEWER of those two systems being the aggravating one. Here's hoping that they ditch most of the bad ideas and clean it up some.

Comment: Re:What does it come with (Score 1) 215

by MBGMorden (#47707621) Attached to: New HP Laptop Would Mean Windows at Chromebook Prices

Admittedly I don't like Microsoft's "cloud" as much as Google, but with Windows 8 they're pretty much there too. Web versions of Office are available with an Outlook.com account (which is actually what gets tied to your computer login). All the save dialogs (Microsoft's at least) are linked to your OneDrive (cloud) account.

Don't get me wrong Metro and the Start Screen are steaming piles of shit, but they're actually coming around ok on the cloud storage and integration front.

Comment: Already there (Score 1) 215

by MBGMorden (#47707601) Attached to: New HP Laptop Would Mean Windows at Chromebook Prices

Tiny Chromebook-sized Windows laptops are already about there. Acer's E3 series has basically Chromebook specs (Celeron Dual-core and 2GB RAM) and a 320GB hard drive and can be had quite easily for $250. I just recently picked one up from Best Buy for $199 (may have been a sale - not sure).

I may eventually put Linux on it (I run Mint on my desktop), but for my needs something like this works great. I use my laptop maybe 10 times per year while traveling. I just need something functional with a keyboard, screen, and internet connection.

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