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Comment: Re:OKC's match algos suck (Score 1) 111

by Too Much Noise (#47555433) Attached to: OKCupid Experiments on Users Too

It's called the "tyrrany of dimensions". The more variables you have, the more data points you need exponentially to derive meaningful partitioning analysis from it, regardless of how clever your distance algorithms are.

Indeed, but only if you insist on carrying along in your analysis all the irrelevant and correlated dimensions.

And they have hundreds of questions when a dozen would be about all the entire population of Earth could support.

So do surveys, for significantly smaller sample sizes. I wouldn't be surprised if a non-trivial percentage of those questions are intentionally redundant - you know, to check *ahem* consistency, improve accuracy, etc. If, say, you have 100 questions grouped into 10 categories with 10q/cat, you have just dropped the dimensionality significantly while at the same time having more confidence in your data. A rule of thumb in surveys is don't trust the user^W^W^W^W *ahem* trust, but verify.

Comment: Re:Appropriate punishment (Score 1) 176

He also labors under the left-wing echo chamber meme about "corporate personhood".

In the ruling, the SC made it expressly clear this was not some corporate pseudo-person's right to speech, but rather the rights of the owners, who carry along the right of free speech whatever they do, like anyone. Congress is specifically disempowered from attaching conditions to speech when creating groups of people, such as a "corporation".

For that matter, the money is speech because it buys use of a press, which is also specified in the First Amendment, and deliberately so, lest rulers want to try to control speech indirectly by banning or controlling the press, which they did all the time, too.

Comment: Re:OKC's match algos suck (Score 1) 111

by Impy the Impiuos Imp (#47554173) Attached to: OKCupid Experiments on Users Too

It's called the "tyrrany of dimensions". The more variables you have, the more data points you need exponentially to derive meaningful partitioning analysis from it, regardless of how clever your distance algorithms are.

And they have hundreds of questions when a dozen would be about all the entire population of Earth could support.

Comment: Re:And... (Score 4, Informative) 278

Well, if you read TFA (no, I'm not new here) they have a sidebar call out that answers your question...

"Software licenses for productivity suites cost Toulouse 1.8 million euro every three years. Migration cost us about 800,000 euro, due partly to some developments. One million euro has actually been saved in the first three years. It is a compelling proof in the actual context of local public finance," says Monthubert.

So about 8K in migration costs vs. 18K in licensing. Assuming another 2-3K of unforeseen support over training issues or missing features that haven't been caught yet it should be a significant savings. And if you factor in the migration cost as a one time payment and assume support costs go down over time as people get used to the new system than the savings become very large indeed after the three years cited in the article.

Comment: Re:Good to hear (Score 3, Informative) 278

Most of what I've ever had to use it for was pretty simple so genuinely asking here; is Dia not a good Visio replacement? Are there features in Visio that make it more attractive for even simple stuff or is it that Visio has advanced features that haven't been replicated elsewhere?

Comment: Re:Why I'm on a well in a sustainable aquifer. (Score 1) 369

Old Sam Kinison joke, about starving kids in Africa: "These kids don't need food. What these kids need is luggage. We have deserts in America, too. WE JUST DON'T LIVE IN 'EM!!! AHHHHH AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH AHHHHHHHHHHHH!"

Except that we do. And we farm vast deserts, too.

Idle

Poetry For Sysadmins: Shall I Compare Thee To a Lumbering Bear? 31

Posted by samzenpus
from the admin-admin-burning-bright-in-the-office-fluorescent-light dept.
itwbennett writes Don't forget that July 25th is Sysadmin Day — a good day to show love to the folks who save your butt again and again when you mess up your computer. Forget the chocolate and flowers, long-time sysadmin Sandra Henry-Stocker has tailored some poems to celebrate these under appreciated, hard-working souls.
Space

Black Holes Not Black After All, Theorize Physicists 224

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the lemon-chiffon-hole dept.
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes Black holes are singularities in spacetime formed by stars that have collapsed at the end of their lives. But while black holes are one of the best known ideas in cosmology, physicists have never been entirely comfortable with the idea that regions of the universe can become infinitely dense. Indeed, they only accept this because they can't think of any reason why it shouldn't happen. But in the last few months, just such a reason has emerged as a result of intense debate about one of cosmology's greatest problems — the information paradox. This is the fundamental tenet in quantum mechanics that all the information about a system is encoded in its wave function and this always evolves in a way that conserves information. The paradox arises when this system falls into a black hole causing the information to devolve into a single state. So information must be lost.

Earlier this year, Stephen Hawking proposed a solution. His idea is that gravitational collapse can never continue beyond the so-called event horizon of a black hole beyond which information is lost. Gravitational collapse would approach the boundary but never go beyond it. That solves the information paradox but raises another question instead: if not a black hole, then what? Now one physicist has worked out the answer. His conclusion is that the collapsed star should end up about twice the radius of a conventional black hole but would not be dense enough to trap light forever and therefore would not be black. Indeed, to all intents and purposes, it would look like a large neutron star.

Comment: Virtusl mapping of brain areas (Score 1) 51

> virtual dangerous fire escape

"After further study to discern the validity of the virtual-to-real world response, we have decided to rename the region of the brain that lit up in the rescuers as the "minimaxxer seeking rare drops" area and that of those who just fled as the "IDGAF trolls hahahablongota".

"Here at the Phone Company, we serve all kinds of people; from Presidents and Kings to the scum of the earth ..."

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