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Comment: I'm fine with this, with a few caveats (Score 1) 496

by lemur666 (#46646487) Attached to: Will Cameras Replace Sideview Mirrors On Cars In 2018?

Pros:
Almost nobody adjusts their mirrors correctly, and they almost always leave big blind spots.
The cameras can offer perfect placement for blindspot visibility.
On motorcycles they can be next to useless (my elbows look great, thanks for asking)
It will probably be coupled with a collision warning / lane departure system.

Neutrals:
You know they are going to make them record video which can be recovered in the event of a crash.

Cons:
It better be high def.
It better offer enhanced (contrast improvement) night mode (IR capable) in a non night-vision ruining way (Red & black at night)
It better offer some way to judge distance.
The screens better be glare proof.
The lens better keep itself clean.

Comment: Uhm. Duh? (Score 1) 37

by lemur666 (#46138075) Attached to: Mysterious Underwater Circles Off the Coast of Denmark Explained

Anyone who has a dog and a lawn could have explained this one.

When our dog takes a crap on the lawn, and it isn't cleaned up promptly, within a week there's a dead spot with a perfect ring of extra healthy grass around it.

Too many 'nutrients' at ground zero kills the grass, but around the edges where it gets diluted the grass grows like crazy.

I'm still going with aliens pooping, though.

Comment: Standard Operating Procedure for India. (Score 5, Interesting) 226

by lemur666 (#45656977) Attached to: Nokia Takeover In Jeopardy Due To Alleged $3.4B Tax Bill In India

I worked at a large multinational that was slated to be acquired by a larger multinational.

Then, mid-way through the process came the "Oh no! India wants billions in 'back taxes' due to the sale!"

The solution was that rather than merging the two companies (triggering the giant tax bill), the Indian Development Center was kept as the last remnant of the old multinational and was now considered a "wholly owned subsidiary" of the buying multinational. Apparently the lack of a formal merger of just the portion of the company based out of India negated the tax bill somehow.

So

a) This is nothing more than the standard shakedown the government of India does whenever there's a merger of giants like this.
b) It can also be avoided by some rather facile legal trickery.

It strikes me as foolish both to make such huge claims of taxes owed when a merger like this occurs and to make those taxes so easy to avoid.

Comment: Lazy? Yes. Devs? No. (Score 1) 491

I adopted scrum in my org, but only in response to a product management org that refuse to do their job. We got features masquerading as requirements, we got endless tactical "the customer wants x" requests all while upper management basically was accusing the team of being lazy for not giving them everything they wanted (and more) right away.

So we adopted agile. This let upper mgmt see we were working as hard as we could and it forced PM to decide "what do you want next? What's the minimum viable set of features? Is this more important than that?"

Yes agile isn't a cure all, but it definitely helps dev remain productive in the face of laziness and stupidity elsewhere in the org.

I've also seen a ton of fake agile (we call it "Fragile") where people adopt the buzzwords of agile without considering that good agile takes a lot of work. Fragile is adopting all the bad parts of agile without any understanding of the discipline involved to do it right (track technical debt, and pay it off as you go. Sprints are no excuse to not do long-term planning / grooming of the backlog. Daily stand-ups, where you track impediments are crucial. etc,)

Success with agile only comes if you understand when it's useful (where there's a large amount of uncertainty/stupidity, somewhere in the org)

It helps mask underlying problems (the uncertainty) while still maintaining productivity. But I wouldn't fly in a plane that was designed with agile principles. Uncertainty in a "mission critical" engineering problem kills people.

Comment: Here's a good rule of thumb... (Score 1) 149

by lemur666 (#39865485) Attached to: BART Defends Mobile Service Shutdown

Wither goes local government, wither goes the federal government.

Barring intervention from the supreme court.

Given the feckless state of our current federal legislature, this is why it's important to elect the right person to the presidency: They will pick the next batch to decide this sort of thing.

Comment: He's a recidivist (Score 1) 898

by lemur666 (#37395594) Attached to: UK Man Jailed For Being a Jerk On the Internet

Some repeated behaviors are a bell-weather of behaviors to come.

Torturing small animals seems to be a common gateway behavior for serial killers.

Bullying and/or narcissistic behavior is a common thread among criminals.

In this case severe trolling is an indicator of... what?

I'm guessing something in the sales department, politics or mass-media news show.

Sorry. "Opinion" show.

Comment: Re:I think everyone is missing the point... (Score 1) 937

by lemur666 (#37071336) Attached to: 8 Grams of Thorium Could Replace Gasoline In Cars

The concept isn't that the thorium somehow gives off extra heat, it's that thorium is especially good at storing heat energy.

The laser is used to pump heat into the thorium quickly. The hot thorium is then put into contact with water to generate steam, but in the process the thorium is gradually cooled.

There's no magic, radioactive process going on here folks, just a material with a really high specific heat capacity. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_capacity

I will add however that this seems like complete snake oil.

Comment: I think everyone is missing the point... (Score 1) 937

by lemur666 (#37071280) Attached to: 8 Grams of Thorium Could Replace Gasoline In Cars

The concept isn't that the thorium somehow gives off extra heat, it's that thorium is especially good at storing heat energy.

The laser is used to pump heat into the thorium quickly. The hot thorium is then put into contact with water to generate steam, but in the process the thorium is gradually cooled.

There's no magic, radioactive process going on here folks, just a material with a really high specific heat capacity. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_capacity

They are relatively good but absolutely terrible. -- Alan Kay, commenting on Apollos

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