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Comment Re:Not suspicious (Score 1) 527

Canned food only has a 2 year shelf life....

Canned food does not have a 'shelf life' of two years. You are thinking of bottled water (thanks to New Jersey). Most canned food has a 'best by' date, but that is related to flavor, marketing and the ability to track food in case of a recall. It doesn't actually apply to the actual nutrition and safety of the packaged food.

Comment Shut Down And Give Back Your Funding (Score 1) 185

When a public institution finds itself out of a job because it is no longer needed... that public institution should shut down and give the funding back.
As an organization paid for with student fees (and possibly some government funds?) when your 'mission' is complete, you don't go looking for another mission, you go looking for a new job!.
The organization you work for has zero inherent right to exist once it's purpose has been OBE (Overcome By Events), or the problem it was created to solve has been solved.


Submission + - OpenDocument Foundation closes down

Munchkinguy writes: "First, they dropped support for their namesake OpenDocument Format and switching to W3C "Compund Document Format". Then, W3C's Chris Lilley says that CDF is "was not created to be, and isn't suitable for use as, an office format". Now, the Foundation has mysteriously shut down, leaving the following message:

The OpenDocument Foundation, Inc. is closed. We sincerely wish our friends and associates in the OpenDocument Community all the best and much success going forward. Good-bye and good luck.

Submission + - Bee Farmers Buzzing About Misfortunes

Da3vid writes: "Bees have been mysteriously disappearing. Beekeepers in 22 states report losses of up to 80 percent. Speculation is that mites or poor nectar has caused their demise, but scientists haven't reached any conclusions. One farmer estimates that he will lose $350,000 based only on his current losses. In only a matter of days, entire hives have been lost. Is this a problem we have already seen the effects of, or is it just developing?"
The Internet

Submission + - Flu pandemic could lead to Internet usage limits

PetManimal writes: "If a pandemic were to occur, many companies and organizations would ask their staffs to work from home. The impact of millions of additional people using the Internet from home might require individuals and companies to voluntarily restrain themselves from surfing to high-bandwidth sites, such as YouTube. If people don't comply, the government may step in and limit 'Net usage. The scenario is not far-fetched: Last year at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland, a group of telecom and government officials conducted a pandemic exercise based on a hypothetical breakout of bird flu in central Europe. The results weren't pretty:

"We assumed total absentees of 30% to 60% trying to work from home, which would have overwhelmed the Internet," said participant Bill Thoet, vice president of Booz Allen Hamilton. "We did not assume that the backbone would be gone, but that the edge of the network, where everyone was trying to access their office from home, would be overwhelmed. The absence of maintenance was also a factor. The person who brought up the problem was himself a CEO of an Internet service provider. "The conclusion [of imminent collapse] was not absolute, and the situation was not digitally simulated, but the idea of everyone working from home appears untenable," Thoet said.

Submission + - Is it a phone? Or a computer?

Dynamoo writes: "Mobile Gazette has taken a look at the Nokia E90 Communicator, a mobile handset so crammed with features that it's difficult to list them all, but it does include 3.5G data, GPS, and finally this version will work in the US.

At around $1000, the E90 will be more expensive than many laptops. Will people really be able to get value for money out of it? Or will they buy it just because it's very, very cool?"
The Internet

Submission + - Firefox 3 To Support Offline Apps

An anonymous reader writes: Read/WriteWeb reports that Robert O'Callahan from Mozilla, a kiwi who drives the rendering engine of Mozilla/FireFox, spoke at the recent New Zealand Foo Camp event about how Firefox 3 will deliver support for offline applications. This means you'll be able to use your web apps — like Gmail, Google Docs & Spreadsheets, Google Calendar, etc — in the browser even when offline. Not only does this move suit Google, but it makes Firefox attractive as the browser platform of choice for SaaS providers like All of which will hit Microsoft where it hurts. Robert O'Callahan turns up in the comments to the article to say that "Yes, Web apps need to be reengineered for this, and no, no-one (including Google) has announced they will do so — although we hope they will!".

Radioactive cats have 18 half-lives.